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ShopNotes - Over My Head...?

by juniorjock
posted 01-05-2011 11:02 PM


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57 replies

57 replies so far

View dbhost's profile

dbhost

5386 posts in 1955 days


#1 posted 01-05-2011 11:19 PM

I saw that thing and my head hurt. I am busy making toys, clocks, and simple woodworking projects and being happy as a clam. That router milling machine is beyond me at this point… But practice makes perfect they say!

-- My workshop blog can be found at http://daves-workshop.blogspot.com

View SPalm's profile

SPalm

4904 posts in 2605 days


#2 posted 01-05-2011 11:25 PM

Hey JJ,

I just watched some of the videos, and I don’t subscribe to the mag or the website. It’s kind of crazy cool, but wow, I certainly don’t want one.

Steve

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

View juniorjock's profile

juniorjock

1930 posts in 2488 days


#3 posted 01-05-2011 11:27 PM

Steve…. Well, there you go, I can’t even find a film clip, much less try to build something like this. Could you post the link for me please?
- SY

View SPalm's profile

SPalm

4904 posts in 2605 days


#4 posted 01-05-2011 11:29 PM

View juniorjock's profile

juniorjock

1930 posts in 2488 days


#5 posted 01-05-2011 11:35 PM

Thanks Steve. I looked at the first clip and will be going back to check out the other ones. I know it would be possible to build, but like db said, there would be a lot of head pain….... But, can you imagine all that you could do with this thing…
- SY

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15714 posts in 2941 days


#6 posted 01-05-2011 11:38 PM

I received my copy of the magazine on Saturday, and I should be finishing up my version of the router milling machine this weekend.

I also have some stock in the Brooklyn bridge to sell, if anyone is interested.

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

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SPalm

4904 posts in 2605 days


#7 posted 01-05-2011 11:40 PM

I built my first CNC machine in a weekend…..

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

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PurpLev

8476 posts in 2371 days


#8 posted 01-05-2011 11:49 PM

thats a cool lathe, looks to me like a shop built legacy.

Charlie – I’ll trade you with some stocks in salt ocean water that I bought some years back

-- ㊍ When in doubt - There is no doubt - Go the safer route.

View b2rtch's profile

b2rtch

4351 posts in 1771 days


#9 posted 01-06-2011 12:05 AM

Sears was selling a machine like this in the 60’s
One could probably find a ‘never” used one

-- Bert

View Loren's profile

Loren

7809 posts in 2371 days


#10 posted 01-06-2011 12:09 AM

That’s a cool jig – and not really that complicated.

The Legacy adds a 3rd axis that lets it do some additional things.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View mfike's profile

mfike

100 posts in 2389 days


#11 posted 01-06-2011 12:26 AM

Juniorjock, if you’re anything like me a lot of these projects kind make your head hurt when you first read through them. Once I commit to building something though, and tackle one problem at a time, it usually turns out to be easier than I first thought.

View richgreer's profile

richgreer

4525 posts in 1797 days


#12 posted 01-06-2011 12:36 AM

There is no way that I will attempt that project. However, it does not bother me that ShopNotes included this project. I don’t expect every project to be right for me. Essentially, if I get 1 project and/or a couple of tips I can use in a magazine I’m satisfied.

-- Rich, Cedar Rapids, IA - I'm a woodworker. I don't create beauty, I reveal it.

View dq2's profile

dq2

71 posts in 1527 days


#13 posted 01-06-2011 12:55 AM

Sears did sell this back in the 70’s. I still have mine. Used it once for fluting. This was a lot easier to set up and use than what ShopNotes is explaining. No dials, no gears, just one crank handle. My manual disappeared a long time ago.

-- - DQ in Phoenix -

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mpounders

746 posts in 1618 days


#14 posted 01-06-2011 01:09 AM

I also have a Sears router crafter that does this! I tried it a few times trying to taper dowels for canes and carve spirals…..decided it was quicker for me to do the spirals by hand. This machine seems a lot sturdier than my router-crafter, but it sure was a painful way to round up your stock. I like watching the gears thoough!

-- Mike P., Arkansas, http://mikepounders.weebly.com

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dq2

71 posts in 1527 days


#15 posted 01-06-2011 01:15 AM

If you want to see how a router crafter works, check out the YouTube video demonstration.

-- - DQ in Phoenix -

View bigike's profile

bigike

4033 posts in 2011 days


#16 posted 01-06-2011 01:21 AM

wow very cool set up i think im gonna get that shop notes an make one. Thanks.

-- Ike, Big Daddies Woodshop, http://www.icombadaniels@yahoo.com

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

3935 posts in 2386 days


#17 posted 01-06-2011 03:10 AM

I give the guys at ShopNotes / WoodSmith a lot of credit … it is a heck of a challenge for the magazine editors to keep coming up with new material. Whether I build the stuff or not, it makes for interesting reading.

That being said, I don’t think I have space for one of these in my shop.

—Gerry

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

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TopamaxSurvivor

15024 posts in 2399 days


#18 posted 01-06-2011 10:52 AM

I saw it, but I still have an unused Sears model from the 70s. I was going to try a little woodworking, but got side tracked for about 35 years ;-)

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View rance's profile

rance

4145 posts in 1883 days


#19 posted 01-06-2011 01:34 PM

My views pretty much line up with RichGreer. I’m actually the kind of guy that would build a machine like that. My problem is that I don’t like to actually SPEND MONEY on lumber for too many projects. I take a project like that and get to a stopping point when it comes time to actually BUY materials(including hardware). I know, I need to get over it. :) I’m in therapy now. The machine looks like something that Matthias Wandal would build.

When you break it down, the machine doesn’t really look all that complicated, I just can’t see it being useful for the types of knick-knacks that I build. Storage would be another problem with that one in ShopNotes.

I am somewhat interested in the Pen Wizard, but its almost reasonable enough that I might just buy one rather than build it.

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

View b2rtch's profile

b2rtch

4351 posts in 1771 days


#20 posted 01-06-2011 04:07 PM

There is sears one on Ebay for $75.00

-- Bert

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SnowyRiver

51450 posts in 2203 days


#21 posted 01-06-2011 04:31 PM

I know what you mean. There are plans out there that look overwhelming. I have found if you want to work a difficult plan just concentrate on one step at a time and you will find that its much more managable and in the end it wont seem too bad. I think sometimes when looking at the plan as a whole it seems confusing and impossible, but its much easier to take it one step at a time.

-- Wayne - Plymouth MN

View Tim_456's profile

Tim_456

160 posts in 2318 days


#22 posted 01-06-2011 05:39 PM

I remember seeing this type of machines in one of the Spielman router books. that one used bicycle chains and sprockets for the gearing and synchronizing mechanisms. It definately looks cool and there are good things to learn from it, unfortunatly for me, many of those things would include frustration and yet another unfinished project to make unfinished projects ;)

View NBeener's profile

NBeener

4806 posts in 1897 days


#23 posted 01-06-2011 05:54 PM

They’ve been batting that one around, over on SawmillCreek. , too.

I’m not interested, personally, but I AM fascinated by the thing !

-- -- Neil

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2744 days


#24 posted 01-06-2011 06:01 PM

I just found a local guy witha CNC machine for rent at $10.00 an hour.
I just might take a crack at this design. The video is very well presented and the machine is pretty striaght forward except for the gears.
I have used this one only once so maybe making a dedicated behemoth like this is still in the distant future.;-)

From misc pics

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View b2rtch's profile

b2rtch

4351 posts in 1771 days


#25 posted 01-06-2011 06:21 PM

How many fluted table legs one needs to make every year/
Except if this is your business,to buy or to build a machine just doing this does not seem to be very cost effective
Another thing, looking at the video this thing seems to be extremely slow.

-- Bert

View Loren's profile

Loren

7809 posts in 2371 days


#26 posted 01-06-2011 08:42 PM

The Legacy is slow too – which is why some users invest in the motors so
you can set up a cut, flip a switch, and the router goes to the end of the
cut. Then you come back and do the next cut.

It all seems really tedious unless you’re cranking out architectural columns
for custom homes and selling them for over $1000 a piece – in which case
a router mill becomes a “make money machine”.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2744 days


#27 posted 01-06-2011 08:49 PM

Still seems like a great tool for a retired guy to make some spare pocket change now and then.
It dosen’t look that expensive to build. The gears would be the most costly.
I wonder if they are supplying DXF files for those with their plans?

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View Loren's profile

Loren

7809 posts in 2371 days


#28 posted 01-06-2011 08:56 PM

Aren’t the gears wood? Probably the lead screw would set you back
$50 or $100.

-- http://lawoodworking.com

View b2rtch's profile

b2rtch

4351 posts in 1771 days


#29 posted 01-06-2011 08:56 PM

Most architectural columns today are not made of wood but of synthetic materiel which are much better for this use.(do not rot or crack)

-- Bert

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2744 days


#30 posted 01-06-2011 09:12 PM

I would think product comming off this machine a bit short and small for Architectural columns.
You are right however, that there is a lot of prefab resin forms invading the business at this time.
This is more suited to finish cabinetry for upscale commisions.

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1838 days


#31 posted 01-08-2011 07:43 PM

look at it this way
I know its just a jiig so you can come further with your building of your table or what ever
but for the hobbyworker it wuold work very well in the way of doing woodwoorking
when he build the maschine and again when he use it even if it just a onetime use
I know a hobbywoodworker only have very limit shoptime …but it will still be a well
used time for her/hime

take care
Dennis

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2744 days


#32 posted 01-08-2011 08:03 PM

To put this in perspective I checked the selling price or “fluted table legs (36”) .

Have a look and tell us what you think?

http://www.tablelegs.com/Columns/Classic-Doric-Columns/Fluted-Classic-Doric-Columns-36/Fluted-Classic-Doric-Columns-36x612.aspx

I looks like a set of 4 legs could run well over $1000.00.

Sure beats the heck outta cutting boards now doesn’t it. ;-)

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1838 days


#33 posted 01-08-2011 09:08 PM

Bob
It looks like its worth every minuts of building the maschine even for just one piece of funiture…LOL

thank´s for the link

Dennis

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2744 days


#34 posted 01-08-2011 09:49 PM

Dennis, A guy with a CNC machine can knock those gears out for very little money compared to the cost of a Legacy machine. I doubt that a hobbiest would wear out a set in a lifetime even made with baltic birch.

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View Dennisgrosen's profile

Dennisgrosen

10850 posts in 1838 days


#35 posted 01-08-2011 11:05 PM

yes I know that
I was just thinking of those that not have cnc, Bs but have to cut them by hand or scrollsaw
it takes a little longer
beside I thought just to make the maschine cuold be funny too just like if people make
a V-drum or drumsander out of wood and like Mathias Wandell made a Bs out of wood
and all the other jiigs he has created :-)

Dennis

View Edziu's profile

Edziu

150 posts in 1774 days


#36 posted 01-09-2011 01:05 AM

Rich Greer is right- after so many issues of ShopNotes, how many different projects can they keep printing? Also, consider the guy who has subscribed to ShopNotes for 20, 30, 40 years, he’s got more skill level under his belt, and still needs projects to challenge him. The fluting jig is something I won’t build anytime soon, but if I need to, I’ll know where to find the plans.

View poopiekat's profile

poopiekat

3710 posts in 2457 days


#37 posted 01-09-2011 02:32 AM

Wow, there is no way you should compare these awesome shop-built units to those pathetic ‘router crafter’ things. I guess it all depends on how far you want to go with your creative ventures.

-- Einstein: "The intuitive mind is a sacred gift, and the rational mind is a faithful servant. We have created a society that honors the servant and has forgotten the gift." I'm Poopiekat!!

View sras's profile

sras

3911 posts in 1852 days


#38 posted 01-09-2011 03:26 AM

You know, I am one of those who would build this if I can only find an excuse (and the time). For me the build itself would be rewarding. I have a latent desire to build a wooden clock, this would be a good practice project. Then I could make fluted columns for the clock!

-- Steve - Impatience is Expensive

View Ken90712's profile

Ken90712

15161 posts in 1912 days


#39 posted 01-09-2011 04:48 AM

I have 5 yrs worth of Shopenotes and just today I was going through all of them making a list of all the different projects I want to make from them. But when I looked at the project you mentioned, I was thinking that I really don’t have the patience or time to make one these. But as mentioned above they really try hard to come up with new things to try and I love the magazine.

-- Ken, "Everyday above ground is a good day!"

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

15024 posts in 2399 days


#40 posted 01-09-2011 04:55 AM

It is a good thing people have short memories, otherwise the mags would have been out of business 30 yrs ago :-))

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Steve's profile

Steve

119 posts in 1853 days


#41 posted 01-09-2011 02:23 PM

Reminds me of some of the machines on this site.

View dpoisson's profile (online now)

dpoisson

179 posts in 1637 days


#42 posted 01-09-2011 05:24 PM

My router (used to be my grand-father’s router: a craftmans) manual’s talk about that craftman jig!

-- http://picasaweb.google.ca/dpoisson

View ChrisCarr's profile

ChrisCarr

196 posts in 1621 days


#43 posted 01-11-2011 07:15 AM

very cool machine.

Maybe next month shopnotes will make a machine that does the work of 200 router bit profiles by using only 1 straight bit :P

View Chispa's profile

Chispa

3 posts in 1413 days


#44 posted 01-18-2011 04:14 PM

When I saw it I really wanted to make one. I wasn’t thinking about bedposts or table legs, more like any length dowel out of any wood, as well as an easy way to thread dowel. Sort of like a Beall threading machine, but with any TPI.

I’ll bet you could mount a dremel and do inside threading of a wood nut as well if you had a way to mount the workpiece.

View hardhead's profile

hardhead

56 posts in 1375 days


#45 posted 02-25-2011 01:24 AM

Any body know where I can get the gears cut. I would like to have them made from a hard wood and cut with a cnc machine for accuracy. Thanks.

-- HardHead.

View Joe S.'s profile

Joe S.

4 posts in 1216 days


#46 posted 07-29-2011 07:04 PM

I’ve almost completed my Router Milling machine from Shopnotes 115, but some of the gearing is causing me fits. I’d like to see more pictures that what they have in the magazine or online such as from others that have built it.

View SPHinTampa's profile

SPHinTampa

548 posts in 2408 days


#47 posted 07-29-2011 07:18 PM

You can buy the set up shown in Bob#2’s posting from House of Tools in Canada for $200. $99 on sale. another $40 in shipping to get to the states.

I got it and keep meaning to use it. Never really got around to it. Cool in concept, but I don’t build a lot of formal furniture with columns or barley twists where it would get used.

Some people really like to build jigs … this one would be a ton of work for a real specialty need. Would be a feeling of accomplishment, not sure how often it would get used.

-- Shawn, I ask in order to learn

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helluvawreck

15983 posts in 1589 days


#48 posted 07-29-2011 09:03 PM

One of these days I would like to find time to build one of those along with some other machines and jigs but I plan on using mostly machinist and metal working skills so they won’t be woodworking projects. I have a lot of old machine frames and many other mechanical parts saved up for this. Unfortunately, time is the great enemy. It will be very difficult to scrape up the needed time.

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

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rance

4145 posts in 1883 days


#49 posted 07-29-2011 09:23 PM

@LR53, define “fits”. And what weapon are you using, scrollsaw, bandsaw, TS, hand saw?

-- Backer boards, stop blocks, build oversized, and never buy a hand plane--

View Joe S.'s profile

Joe S.

4 posts in 1216 days


#50 posted 07-29-2011 09:52 PM

The gears have all been cut using my Grizzly G0457 14” bandsaw. It’s their placement on the machine that driving me nuts.

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