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View Bob #2's profile

How safe is your Ladder?

by Bob #2
posted 11-02-2010 08:27 PM


34 replies so far

View Viking's profile

Viking

857 posts in 1944 days


#1 posted 11-02-2010 08:42 PM

Bob;

Glad it was not a higher step that failed, nice replacement ladder though.

Thanks for sharing this.

Good Luck!

-- Rick Gustafson - Lost Creek Ranch - Colorado County, Texas

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Bob #2

3808 posts in 2770 days


#2 posted 11-02-2010 09:03 PM

Rick I learned my last lesson with cheap ladders back in 2008 when this unit collapsed under me and wrecked my back and foot. I was lucky it didn’t puncture my gut on the way down. No more cheap ladders for me!

From new shop

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

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Bob #2

3808 posts in 2770 days


#3 posted 11-02-2010 09:04 PM

sorry, duplicate ??

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View JJohnston's profile

JJohnston

1596 posts in 2040 days


#4 posted 11-02-2010 09:12 PM

Ladders are big liability. I’m not surprised the manufacturer offered you the top of the line model. I am surprised they didn’t do it immediately.

-- "A man may conduct himself well in both adversity and good fortune, but if you want to test his character, give him power." - Abraham Lincoln

View Gary's profile

Gary

7602 posts in 2181 days


#5 posted 11-02-2010 09:15 PM

Bob, would you let us know the name of the manufacturer that took such good care of you?

-- Gary, DeKalb Texas only 4 miles from the mill

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Bob #2

3808 posts in 2770 days


#6 posted 11-02-2010 09:29 PM

Hi Gary: The company that took care of me is Lite Ladders]
Here’s the URL:
http://liteladders.com/

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View KnickKnack's profile

KnickKnack

993 posts in 2315 days


#7 posted 11-02-2010 09:39 PM

Whilst I agree with all the above – I think we’ve missed a small(ish) pointlet along the way.

As I understand it the ladder was rated at 300lb, and had a sticker to say so. Regardless of whether you buy this from a “cheap” shop, regardless of the brand or the place of manufacture, surely in this day and age you ought to be able to trust what the sticker says – I thought we’d done the “you can’t lie to a customer” thing several decades ago.
If this manufacturer accepts that their 300lb ladders don’t work then they need to get them all off the shelves now before someone gets seriously hurt.

-- "Do not speak – unless it improves on silence." --- "Following the rules and protecting the regulations is binding oneself without rope."

View Tromni's profile

Tromni

7 posts in 1517 days


#8 posted 11-02-2010 09:53 PM

I have really enjoyed using ladders by Little Giant. We used them exclusively at the theater I worked in, often carrying heavy lighting instruments with us to the very top of the ladder.

They’re definitely pricey, but they are built like tanks and are both stable and sturdy over the long haul.

-- Mark - Springfield, Virginia

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Bob #2

3808 posts in 2770 days


#9 posted 11-02-2010 09:53 PM

Knickknack: while agree with your assesment you have to realise that that is not my end of the deal.
They may very well be doing that as we speak.
I was /am speaking to them stepping forward and making my complaint a priority for them.
What does surprise me more is the retailers position on this . When I visited their store they had a whole 10×10 foot bin filled with the product on sale all with the (improper??) stickers on them.
In Canada there is no department of Government in which to lodge a complaint even if you have a legitmate beef so you are pretty much on your own here.

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View Karson's profile

Karson

34916 posts in 3149 days


#10 posted 11-02-2010 10:11 PM

Bob, glad that you were able to get satisfaction, eventually.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View Dan's profile

Dan

3543 posts in 1629 days


#11 posted 11-02-2010 10:55 PM

My best advice for everyone – NEVER trust ANY ladder. Anytime I am climbing any type of ladder I am always prepared to take a fall. Balance is a big key to safety also. If you have large tools up there or you are working with both hands you better be well balanced.

-- Dan - "Collector of Hand Planes"

View Scott Bryan's profile

Scott Bryan

27251 posts in 2570 days


#12 posted 11-03-2010 01:33 AM

Bob, I really enjoy hearing stories like this that have a “happy ending”. It seems that, with a number of companies, customer service tends to be almost an afterthought if it begins to intefere with profits.

-- Challenges are what make life interesting; overcoming them is what makes life meaningful- Joshua Marine

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2770 days


#13 posted 11-03-2010 01:52 AM

I’ve spend the better part of my life dealing with manufacturers and distributors.
Right now there seems to be an almost incredible gap between the manufacturer and the end user, as if that portion of the puzzle was unimportant.
Lack of communication and total lack of basic business skills seem to be at the epicenter of the problems. Mid size companies seem to parachute management in from University courses and pretty much let these folk develop a marketing plan. It usually is bas on hypothetical and theories and fails to address the needs of the retailer and or the customer.
Had a manufacturer call to say that my quarterly sales report was late. I had to tell them that my last order to them was first lost then shipped to a dealer 800 miles from me. The customers purchased elsewhere as they could not wait.
The answer I got was that this was going to impact my quarter to date sales??

Called another today to ask why he had charge $40.00 shipping for a parcel they have usually sent to us for $12.00.
answer… READY FOR THIS .. If we want it insured that’s what we have to pay or get it somewhere else!
We have done business with this company for 35 years. This fool has been there less and 6 months.
The $12.00 shipments also had insurance .
It’s definitely not my fathers world.

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

15077 posts in 2424 days


#14 posted 11-03-2010 03:50 AM

Sounds like there is no hope for those people! Glad you got out of this scrape ok. I noticed on your picture the foot being labeled suitable for soft dirt. No ladder leg is suitable for soft dirt! Put a 2×4 under it.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2770 days


#15 posted 11-03-2010 03:57 AM

Well you got me on that. I simply meant that without the flat foot added to the end of the leg the legs push right into the dirt. I had one previously that had little rubber shoes over the ends of the angle metal.
I usually put a scrap of plywood down when I’m up next to the house or shop.

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View Moron's profile

Moron

4724 posts in 2642 days


#16 posted 11-03-2010 04:13 AM

communication.

I suck at it.

But Bob#2

you are hilarious.

what kills me is looking at the guy whos on my payroll, while he’s chatting to his buddy, on his cell phone, on my dime,and then the next time hes chatting to his gf, his Dad, his Mom, his sister, no matter what BS is just that, BS,....... and then looking back at me, ........................like I have a problem. I just keep shaking my head to the point I might have a disorder of some kind now, like I’m rutting.

ladders. a device made to “cripple you” and if you dont belive me then look at the stats on how many folks were “crippled” from climbing one. The shear statistics breed”fear”. My hats off to those who were forced up one through the barrel of gun and lived to get down again.

Ladders are the one tool that seperate those that claim they can, and those who wisely admit they cant. They utterly make a man, or confirm the fool. Its a fine line, a ladder is, a quick look around to see whos up to the task and there are suddenly “no Takers”

The longer and thinner a ladder extends the fewer the volunteers. The older you get, the even fewer volunteers, likie only teenagers are good at it. ?

I so commend you, for at least trying to teach some one, some thing and making me laugh.

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2770 days


#17 posted 11-03-2010 04:20 AM

I went up on the warehouse roof with an Architect a couple of weeks ago . 22 feet and the ladder starts feeling like a bean pole. We dump over the top and he says to me , ” not too bad this one, I had a tough time last week with a 40 footer in Calgary”.

W A Y outta my league!

I never get used to it and I always end up having to be the guy. ;-)

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

15077 posts in 2424 days


#18 posted 11-03-2010 04:52 AM

Careful there Moron, I have probably spent about 4 or 5% of my life on a ladder :-)) It isn’t quite that bad, is it?

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

15077 posts in 2424 days


#19 posted 11-03-2010 04:57 AM

I have been on a lot of ladders out doors, even fairly hard ground will give under the biggest of ladder feet.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Moron's profile

Moron

4724 posts in 2642 days


#20 posted 11-03-2010 05:14 AM

I love the man/woman who views to the roof like a mountain, like those who show no fear, beyond the measure of “whats safe” and

I went to a nut and bolt, screw wholesaler today. It was simple in my request. I wanted 48 hex head stainless steel bolts/lag botls/screws that fit through a 3/16th dia., hole with 3/8” thick nuts to offset a stainless steel gable….....showed them the scaled drawing…...........................nothing but blank looks, like a deer in headlights. Next thing I know I am forced into listening to a world of crap how he /she made the latest putzer prize in audio stupidity…........................alls I want is a bolt ?

and then theres Tim Hortons

get er done

ladders are cruel teachers in a life long lesson of “I hope I get to climb till the day I die”

the day you stop climbing is the day you stop learming ???? lol

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View jusfine's profile

jusfine

2280 posts in 1674 days


#21 posted 11-03-2010 05:24 AM

Glad they sorted it out for you Bob!

Don’t want you getting hurt, we’ll never have that breakfast… :)

-- Randy "You are judged as much by the questions you ask as the answers you give..."

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2770 days


#22 posted 11-03-2010 06:59 AM

We’ll both probably run out of “chore tiime” pretty soon so that bacon’negger is not that far off.

Looks like we get one more weekend to finish the season. Seems I always think I’m going to get a lot more done than really happens. What is that about? <vbg>

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View JohnDennis's profile

JohnDennis

14 posts in 1693 days


#23 posted 11-03-2010 07:25 AM

“How safe is your ladder?”
Manufacturer’s claims aside… no ladder is safe. As a rock climber—I’ve taken 80+ foot wippers (cut, bruised, and bashed) but always felt less risk climbing than getting on a ladder with no safety in place. The corner of the coffee table or the edge of the brick planter waiting for the back of my head as I climb just a few steps up a ladder. Always respect that ladders are a risk even if they don’t mechanically fail—have a fall out plan so you land on your feet.

-- John D

View canadianchips's profile

canadianchips

1836 posts in 1746 days


#24 posted 11-03-2010 10:43 AM

My last “GOOD PAYING” job was working for a company installing ventialtion systems in buildings. Everything we did was from either a 16ft extension ladder or scaffolds. Sometimes they rented a zoom boom. That was the time I realized a GOOD ladder was important. NO wiggling, no wobbling. Look at where you place the feet and what it is resting against.(Lucky me, I only fell once that year !) The falling didn’t hurt me, it was what I landed on that did the damage.

-- "My mission in life - make everyone smile !"

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

15077 posts in 2424 days


#25 posted 11-03-2010 10:54 AM

I have only fallen once in 42 yrs. Concrete is hard enough from 8 feet. I have known a couple of guys that fell abut 20 and 40. Both broke their arms. All of us were lucky to walk away. I did know of one guy who fell backwards about 3 feet and broke his neck and died.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2770 days


#26 posted 11-03-2010 05:48 PM

I glad to see some of you seasoned ladder guys adding safety tips to this thread.
I think a lot of people, me included, take ladder saftey a bit for granted. It’s a dangerous habit I have weaned myself of the ’-the hard way. <g>

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View TopamaxSurvivor's profile

TopamaxSurvivor

15077 posts in 2424 days


#27 posted 11-03-2010 10:25 PM

Bottom line in most accidents is setup and over reaching. attention to those would eliminate most of the accidents.

One of the guys who broke both arms falling about 20 feet to the concrete floor ask his helper to see if a conduit was through the wall. The helper let go of he ladder to go look and it slipped out from under Neil ;-(( the rest is, as they say, history.

-- "some old things are lovely, warm still with life ... of the forgotten men who made them." - D.H. Lawrence

View mot's profile

mot

4911 posts in 2785 days


#28 posted 11-04-2010 01:27 AM

I think the problem is with the operative, “step,” in the phrase step ladder. When I witnessed someone asking you to step on something, I’m quite certain you exerted more than 300lbs, with the zeal in which you obeyed his command. Perhaps the ladder should be called a, “Stand,” ladder? snicker

Have a peak at the second to last paragraph. :)

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

View Bob #2's profile

Bob #2

3808 posts in 2770 days


#29 posted 11-04-2010 01:42 AM

What a memory!
I love you Mot!
Very funny.
I vas chust folowink orters! <g>

-- A mind, like a home, is furnished by its owner

View TheGravedigger's profile

TheGravedigger

963 posts in 2773 days


#30 posted 11-04-2010 03:42 PM

I used to use the cheap ladders, till one started wobbling like a fishing pole on me. I changed my tune QUICK! Now I use nothing but the top-end orange Werners (300lb). Yes, they weigh a ton, but they’re solid as a rock, and I can climb one hauling a sheet of plywood without fear of the thing wobbling or collapsing on me.

Daddy always said, “Buy cheap, buy twice.”

-- Robert - Visit my woodworking blog: http://littlegoodpieces.wordpress.com

View john's profile

john

2319 posts in 3130 days


#31 posted 11-04-2010 04:04 PM

Climbing ladders are easy compared to this !! :-) http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vQzPB7RkFKA

-- John in Belgrave (Website) http://www.extremebirdhouse.com , http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=112698715866

View nailbanger2's profile

nailbanger2

968 posts in 1892 days


#32 posted 11-04-2010 04:07 PM

Bob #2, it’s worse than you think! In the U.S. (I don’t have a clue about Canada), OSHA covers the rating of ladders. http://www.osha.gov/pls/oshaweb/owadisp.show_document?p_table=STANDARDS&p_id=10839

All ladders are supposed to carry AT LEAST 3.3 times the intended load. For that ladder to be rated 300 lbs., it should not fail until well over 900 lbs. is pushing down on it. I’m not surprised the ladder company wanted to make you happy!

-- Wish I were Norm's Nephew

View Moron's profile

Moron

4724 posts in 2642 days


#33 posted 11-04-2010 05:03 PM

My first experience with a ladder was climbing up one as a kid and my father removed it,then told me to jump and he would catch me. I remember being leary of the situation but trusting my father I jumped and the catch was far from perfect with both of us parralel to the earth and saying to my father “Trust you?” to which he laughed and replied “Just goes to show you son, that you should never trust a soul”

Second experience was as a teenager and working for a construction contractor. having climbed ontothe 12/12 pitch roof and then climbing up a valley I lost my footing and slid down where the only thing stopping me from falling two floors straignt down, was the ladder with just my bosses head sticking up above the soffit and as my two feet hit the ladder rails….................the ladder, with him on it, stopped my fall but sadly the force of hitting it caused the ladder to be pushed slowly away from the building, and standing perfectly vertical it started its inevitable fall. Luckily he was only winded and I was far enough away to escape his eventual wrath.

heres a ladder tip. Never print your name, scratch your name or paste your name onto a ladder that some day might be strapped/tied/clamped to the roofof your car, van and or truck as the chances of it one day, escaping from its strapping and whipping down the highway as it dodges vehicles and wraps itself around a telephone pole, are surprisingly good and having the name on it can make a good life miserable.

-- "Good artists borrow, great artists steal”…..Picasso

View Steve Peterson's profile

Steve Peterson

262 posts in 1831 days


#34 posted 11-04-2010 11:14 PM

Nice new ladder. But it can’t be as safe as my cheapo 6’ ladder because it doesn’t have 80 warning stickers plastered all over it.

-- Steve

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