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Which nails should I use?

by Mourningwood
posted 02-11-2018 04:02 PM


26 replies so far

View 01ntrain's profile

01ntrain

257 posts in 1214 days


#1 posted 02-11-2018 04:17 PM

I would think that 16 gauge nails from a pneumatic nail-gun 2-2.5” in length would do just fine. Since you’re using an adhesive, you could probably get away with 2-3 per stud. Making them pretty easy to hide. Just make sure that you’re not going into any water pipes or electrical wiring.

View jonah's profile

jonah

1841 posts in 3443 days


#2 posted 02-11-2018 04:27 PM

You’ll want 2.5” finish nails. 2” nails will only stick 3/8” into the studs, which isn’t enough. Anything from 15-18 gauge will be fine, especially combined with an adhesive.

View John Smith's profile (online now)

John Smith

1368 posts in 307 days


#3 posted 02-11-2018 04:28 PM

accent wall ???

do you mean sort of like a paneling effect ?
will the boards be horizontal or vertical ?
what size and length are the boards ? (1×6, 1×10, etc)
will anything be added to the wall like shelving, etc ?

-- I started out with nothing in life ~ and still have most of it left.

View tomsteve's profile

tomsteve

825 posts in 1363 days


#4 posted 02-11-2018 07:12 PM

cant offer assistance on the nails ( well, i could, but Johns questions would have to be answered first) but will suggest painting the wall a similar color to the finish before installation. as the wood expands,contracts, moves as wood does, some cracks between boards can open up revealing a thin line of the wall behind. if the wall behind is just white, it looks pretty bad. if its a similar color of the finish, its not noticable.

View Mourningwood's profile

Mourningwood

12 posts in 249 days


#5 posted 02-13-2018 11:57 PM

Thanks guys…the boards are 1×6. They will be hun horizontal. I plan on starting at the bottom and working up so the bottom boards can somewhat support the boards above as I climb the wall. I planned on painting between the lines with a darker brown paint. Just wasnt sure if I needed to bulk up the size of the nails… I was nervous 2.5” finish nails would be too “weak”.

View John Smith's profile (online now)

John Smith

1368 posts in 307 days


#6 posted 02-14-2018 12:21 AM

well – you did mention you would be using an adhesive also.

with any construction adhesive, once it cures, it will never come loose.
you will pull the paper off the drywall before the wood falls off by itself.
15/16 ga X 2.5” pneumatic driven nails will be more than adequate.
if you do not have access to a pneumatic nailer, you can rent one at your tool rental place.
or – if you prefer – you can do the old fashioned hammer and 8d finish nails by hand.
how tall will this wall be ? will the wall hold anything like shelves, etc ?

.

-- I started out with nothing in life ~ and still have most of it left.

View Mourningwood's profile

Mourningwood

12 posts in 249 days


#7 posted 02-14-2018 01:46 PM



well – you did mention you would be using an adhesive also.

with any construction adhesive, once it cures, it will never come loose.
you will pull the paper off the drywall before the wood falls off by itself.
15/16 ga X 2.5” pneumatic driven nails will be more than adequate.
if you do not have access to a pneumatic nailer, you can rent one at your tool rental place.
or – if you prefer – you can do the old fashioned hammer and 8d finish nails by hand.
how tall will this wall be ? will the wall hold anything like shelves, etc ?

.

- John Smith


I already hung a tv and will be mounting an electric fireplace today..as ofbtoday, there are no shelves in the plan. On sure that could change as my clients imagination is endlessly drifting.

View John Smith's profile (online now)

John Smith

1368 posts in 307 days


#8 posted 02-14-2018 02:06 PM

okay – since you do not have any experience with what you are doing
and there is no way to tell what will happen to the wall after you leave,
it is strongly suggested that you go to your Big Box Store and get a couple of pounds
of #8×3 in. Phillips Bugle-Head Coarse Thread Wood Screws and screw each board to the studs.
this will relieve your tension level and provide your customer a good and safe product.
the screws can be driven just a tad below the surface of the wood and will be almost invisible.
if you and your client are really that picky about the fastener being hidden, you can get some
wood filler the same color s the boards and fill over each screw head.
what you need to do for now is get a spare board and practice to see what will work for you within your skill set.

-- I started out with nothing in life ~ and still have most of it left.

View Mourningwood's profile

Mourningwood

12 posts in 249 days


#9 posted 02-14-2018 02:14 PM


well – you did mention you would be using an adhesive also.

with any construction adhesive, once it cures, it will never come loose.
you will pull the paper off the drywall before the wood falls off by itself.
15/16 ga X 2.5” pneumatic driven nails will be more than adequate.
if you do not have access to a pneumatic nailer, you can rent one at your tool rental place.
or – if you prefer – you can do the old fashioned hammer and 8d finish nails by hand.
how tall will this wall be ? will the wall hold anything like shelves, etc ?

.

- John Smith


I already hung a tv and will be mounting an electric fireplace today..as ofbtoday, there are no shelves in the plan. On sure that could change as my clients imagination is endlessly drifting.

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

1144 posts in 2096 days


#10 posted 02-14-2018 02:18 PM



Thanks guys…the boards are 1×6. They will be hun horizontal. I plan on starting at the bottom and working up so the bottom boards can somewhat support the boards above as I climb the wall. I planned on painting between the lines with a darker brown paint. Just wasnt sure if I needed to bulk up the size of the nails… I was nervous 2.5” finish nails would be too “weak”.

- Mourningwood

It sounds like you plan to butt the edges of the boards up tight to each other. Have you thought about the potential for expansion?

View Mourningwood's profile

Mourningwood

12 posts in 249 days


#11 posted 02-14-2018 02:19 PM



okay – since you do not have any experience with what you are doing
and there is no way to tell what will happen to the wall after you leave,
it is strongly suggested that you go to your Big Box Store and get a couple of pounds
of #8×3 in. Phillips Bugle-Head Coarse Thread Wood Screws and screw each board to the studs.
this will relieve your tension level and provide your customer a good and safe product.
the screws can be driven just a tad below the surface of the wood and will be almost invisible.
if you and your client are really that picky about the fastener being hidden, you can get some
wood filler the same color s the boards and fill over each screw head.
what you need to do for now is get a spare board and practice to see what will work for you within your skill set.

- John Smith

You’re correct that I don’t have any experience with these accent walls, but I do a lot of work in this field. I was really just questioning the shear strength of the finish nails. I have total confidence in my abilities using these nails. My lack of confidence was with the nails themselves. If 2.5” finish nails are strong enough for this project, that is the route ill be taking. Thanks for your help.

View Mourningwood's profile

Mourningwood

12 posts in 249 days


#12 posted 02-14-2018 02:22 PM


Thanks guys…the boards are 1×6. They will be hun horizontal. I plan on starting at the bottom and working up so the bottom boards can somewhat support the boards above as I climb the wall. I planned on painting between the lines with a darker brown paint. Just wasnt sure if I needed to bulk up the size of the nails… I was nervous 2.5” finish nails would be too “weak”.

- Mourningwood

It sounds like you plan to butt the edges of the boards up tight to each other. Have you thought about the potential for expansion?

- Kazooman


I did plan to leave a slight gap…what would you recommend?

View Kazooman's profile

Kazooman

1144 posts in 2096 days


#13 posted 02-14-2018 03:03 PM

I don’t have a specific gap in mind, I just know you should have some allowance for expansion. You can find how much a six inch hemlock board can expand on-line, but it really depends on the moisture content of the wood when you install it and what kind of humidity swings it will see. I would bring the wood on to the site and allow it to acclimate just like you would when installing flooring. It is the winter heating season here and the humidity in the house is low. There are a few gaps between boards in my maple floor. They will be game by Spring when we open the windows for some fresh air.

View Mourningwood's profile

Mourningwood

12 posts in 249 days


#14 posted 02-14-2018 03:15 PM



I don’t have a specific gap in mind, I just know you should have some allowance for expansion. You can find how much a six inch hemlock board can expand on-line, but it really depends on the moisture content of the wood when you install it and what kind of humidity swings it will see. I would bring the wood on to the site and allow it to acclimate just like you would when installing flooring. It is the winter heating season here and the humidity in the house is low. There are a few gaps between boards in my maple floor. They will be game by Spring when we open the windows for some fresh air.

- Kazooman


I put the wood in the house two weeks ago to acclimate. We were waiting on the fireplace to be delivered. Im going to look up expansion rate now… Thanks a lot.

View WyattCo's profile

WyattCo

93 posts in 248 days


#15 posted 02-14-2018 03:55 PM

What adhesive?

View Lazyman's profile (online now)

Lazyman

2521 posts in 1532 days


#16 posted 02-14-2018 03:56 PM

Gap requirement depends upon how dry the wood is now and the local and indoor humidity swings. Hemlock’s tangential shrinkage factor is between about 7 to 8% which, if I am doing the math right, would roughly equate to about .015” shrinkage/expansion per percent of moisture change (for new wood) for a 6” wide board. If it has a relatively high moisture content now and it will be in a humidity control space, it may shrink noticeably so would probably need almost no gap. If by mushroom wood you mean salvaged wood , I am not sure what effect that has on shrinkage and expansion, especially if it already has cracks and fissures.

BTW, the recommendation to paint the wall behind the joints is a good one. If the wood will not be painted, I would not try to match the color but just paint a black strip behind the joints. I’ve even used a wide tipped Magic Marker or Sharpie for that. You just don’t want a lighter colored wall to show through the gap.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

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Mourningwood

12 posts in 249 days


#17 posted 02-14-2018 04:50 PM



What adhesive?

- Fthis


I was looking at either power grab or liquid nails…do you have one you would recommend over those?

View WyattCo's profile

WyattCo

93 posts in 248 days


#18 posted 02-14-2018 05:11 PM


What adhesive?

- Fthis

I was looking at either power grab or liquid nails…do you have one you would recommend over those?

- Mourningwood

Loctite PL Premium. Brad’s or nails just hold the substrate in place while the adhesive sets up. ;-)

View John Smith's profile (online now)

John Smith

1368 posts in 307 days


#19 posted 02-14-2018 05:17 PM

X2 for Loctite PL Premium

choosing caulk, sealants and adhesives is a daunting task with all the choices available.
my mottos is:
Read, Understand and Follow the instructions on the label of all products you use.
Pay particular attention to the safety notes and heed the warnings accordingly.
any rags used in the prepping/painting process that have solvents, oils or paint on them,
should be laid out in the open to completely air dry prior to discarding them.

.

-- I started out with nothing in life ~ and still have most of it left.

View Rick S.'s profile (online now)

Rick S.

10549 posts in 3177 days


#20 posted 02-14-2018 08:24 PM


What adhesive?

- Fthis

I was looking at either power grab or liquid nails…do you have one you would recommend over those?

- Mourningwood

I use PL Premium. They now have a PL Premium Quick Set. It works! No use for “Liquid Nails”, used it ONCE and threw the rest away!

Do NOT get PL on your Skin! It sets QUICK and can only be removed by “Mechanical Means” I did it Once and spent a week soaking my hands in the sink and Peeling off what I could.

It said that on the Tube of PL. I forgot to read it or something like that. ...LOL…

Rick

-- Don't Worry About What People Think! They Don't Do It Very Often Anyway!

View John Smith's profile (online now)

John Smith

1368 posts in 307 days


#21 posted 02-14-2018 08:37 PM

LOL Rick – that is why I posted my “motto” up above.
a person can only learn the true meanings of certain things is strictly through experience.
(and reading the instructions and warnings AFTER the damage is done only builds character).

actually, Norm Abram and Tommy Silva made it popular on their TV shows.

“Read, Understand and Follow the instructions on the label of all products you use.
Pay particular attention to the safety notes and heed the warnings accordingly.
and always be sure to wear these – - – safety glasses.”
any rags used in the prepping/painting process that have solvents, oils or paint on them,
should be laid out in the open to completely air dry prior to discarding them.

-- I started out with nothing in life ~ and still have most of it left.

View Rick S.'s profile (online now)

Rick S.

10549 posts in 3177 days


#22 posted 02-14-2018 10:07 PM

Thanks John.

You’re Correct ““Read, Understand and Follow the instructions on the label of all products you use.
Pay particular attention to the safety notes and heed the warnings accordingly.”

Rick

-- Don't Worry About What People Think! They Don't Do It Very Often Anyway!

View Mourningwood's profile

Mourningwood

12 posts in 249 days


#23 posted 02-19-2018 06:51 PM

Thanks for all the help guys…I’m happy with the way the project turned out…still a few small things to button up.

View Mourningwood's profile

Mourningwood

12 posts in 249 days


#24 posted 02-19-2018 06:52 PM



LOL Rick – that is why I posted my “motto” up above.
a person can only learn the true meanings of certain things is strictly through experience.
(and reading the instructions and warnings AFTER the damage is done only builds character).

actually, Norm Abram and Tommy Silva made it popular on their TV shows. Thanks for all your help and suggestions.

“Read, Understand and Follow the instructions on the label of all products you use.
Pay particular attention to the safety notes and heed the warnings accordingly.
and always be sure to wear these – - – safety glasses.”
any rags used in the prepping/painting process that have solvents, oils or paint on them,
should be laid out in the open to completely air dry prior to discarding them.

- John Smith


View Mourningwood's profile

Mourningwood

12 posts in 249 days


#25 posted 02-19-2018 06:54 PM


What adhesive?

- Fthis

I was looking at either power grab or liquid nails…do you have one you would recommend over those?

- Mourningwood

Loctite PL Premium. Brad s or nails just hold the substrate in place while the adhesive sets up. ;-)

- Fthis


Hey…just want to thank you for suggesting the loctite..it worked out great.

View Mourningwood's profile

Mourningwood

12 posts in 249 days


#26 posted 02-19-2018 09:22 PM


LOL Rick – that is why I posted my “motto” up above.
a person can only learn the true meanings of certain things is strictly through experience.
(and reading the instructions and warnings AFTER the damage is done only builds character).

actually, Norm Abram and Tommy Silva made it popular on their TV shows. Thanks for all your help and suggestions.

“Read, Understand and Follow the instructions on the label of all products you use.
Pay particular attention to the safety notes and heed the warnings accordingly.
and always be sure to wear these – - – safety glasses.”
any rags used in the prepping/painting process that have solvents, oils or paint on them,
should be laid out in the open to completely air dry prior to discarding them.

- John Smith

- Mourningwood


LOL Rick – that is why I posted my “motto” up above.
a person can only learn the true meanings of certain things is strictly through experience.
(and reading the instructions and warnings AFTER the damage is done only builds character).

actually, Norm Abram and Tommy Silva made it popular on their TV shows.

“Read, Understand and Follow the instructions on the label of all products you use.
Pay particular attention to the safety notes and heed the warnings accordingly.
and always be sure to wear these – - – safety glasses.”
any rags used in the prepping/painting process that have solvents, oils or paint on them,
should be laid out in the open to completely air dry prior to discarding them.

- John Smith

thanks for all your help John…I meant to say that earlier but ended up just quoting you. Just realized that…I posted pics of the project. Thanks again…I really appreciate the responses.

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