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View AbbyL's profile

How do I get amazing joints?

by AbbyL
posted 02-01-2018 02:27 PM


28 replies so far

View Logan Windram's profile

Logan Windram

347 posts in 2664 days


#1 posted 02-01-2018 02:41 PM

I would get a razor sharp handplane and hit each side of a glue joint- think about it this way, your planer doesn’t cut flat, it takes thousands of scallops and scoops due to the circular cutting nature of the machine, so your mating surfaces are not getting full glue surface connection. Look down your components lengthwise and you will see the very so slight scallops….

Same technique for table top glue-up, or face mating glue-ups- once you get used to it, do spring joints to improve your strength and gluing accuracy.

Good luck!

View RobHannon's profile

RobHannon

190 posts in 733 days


#2 posted 02-01-2018 02:42 PM

Sounds like either your planner blades needs some adjusting or the opposite side of the boards are not flat causing it to rock as it goes through. If they are large boards and you have a jointer I would try that. Small you can use shims and hot glue to get them level on a flat surface like a scrap piece of mdf and pass them through the planer.

I recently had this happen to me on my planer and a wood chip had gotten under one of the blades making in convex. Still not sure how I pulled that off but was an easy fix.

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 3850 days


#3 posted 02-01-2018 02:50 PM

It seems likely to me that your pieces are
curving. They may also be coming out of
the planer thinner in the middle.

Glue joints can be refined by running the
parts over a jointer, using a router table
set up for edge jointing, jointing with a hand
plane, or even rubbing the parts back and
forth on a flat surface with sandpaper taped
to it.

Table saw methods like this may also
work.

View jerkylips's profile

jerkylips

462 posts in 2772 days


#4 posted 02-01-2018 02:52 PM

I know I guy. Call me.

View AbbyL's profile

AbbyL

12 posts in 317 days


#5 posted 02-01-2018 02:58 PM

Loren I’ll try doing the sandpaper and table thing. I’m not experienced enough to know all the wood working terms. But the cheapest route is the best for me so I’ll give that try. What grit sand paper would work best?

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

30061 posts in 2540 days


#6 posted 02-01-2018 03:01 PM

Welcome to Lumberjocks

Where are you located? If you’re close to many people here, I am sure someone would let you use a jointer.

-- Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 3850 days


#7 posted 02-01-2018 03:09 PM



Loren I’ll try doing the sandpaper and table thing. I’m not experienced enough to know all the wood working terms. But the cheapest route is the best for me so I’ll give that try.

- AbbyL

Try to make sure the surface is really flat. I
have a scrap of MDF with a length of 6”
sanding belt glued to it.

I wouldn’t do a whole batch without checking
the joints. If your sanding surface is out of
flat the first few joints will probably tell you.
If you have a stone counter top in the house
those tend to be pretty flat.

View AbbyL's profile

AbbyL

12 posts in 317 days


#8 posted 02-01-2018 03:10 PM

I am in Houston Texas. My countertops are old and uneven. Ahaha. I’ll test it out a couple times on my fold out table

View AbbyL's profile

AbbyL

12 posts in 317 days


#9 posted 02-01-2018 03:11 PM

Actually. I have a scrap piece of that stuff too. I’ll use that. Thanks. :)

View AbbyL's profile

AbbyL

12 posts in 317 days


#10 posted 02-01-2018 03:21 PM


This good right?

View Loren's profile

Loren

10477 posts in 3850 days


#11 posted 02-01-2018 03:26 PM

Yeah, that sort of thing exactly.

You can mark the wood with chalk or pencil
which makes it easy to see where material
is being removed by the sand paper.

View AbbyL's profile

AbbyL

12 posts in 317 days


#12 posted 02-01-2018 03:31 PM

When I clamp them together with my my hands I am now seeing no light.

View jerkylips's profile

jerkylips

462 posts in 2772 days


#13 posted 02-01-2018 03:39 PM

no one mentioned it, but something may be off on your table saw, too. If the blade is not parallel to the fence, you could be getting cuts that aren’t square. If your blade is dull & you’re having to force the wood through, you could be putting uneven pressure on it/letting it come away from the fence.. That sort of thing..

View AbbyL's profile

AbbyL

12 posts in 317 days


#14 posted 02-01-2018 03:41 PM

I don’t have my own table saw yet. I was using a family members one and it is very old and makes sounds it shouldn’t. I’ve learned my mistake with theses boards. One I need more practice with a table saw. Really all power tools and two get my own table saw.

View Sludgeguy's profile

Sludgeguy

43 posts in 324 days


#15 posted 02-01-2018 03:44 PM

View rwe2156's profile

rwe2156

3171 posts in 1683 days


#16 posted 02-01-2018 04:04 PM

First, it sounds like that tablesaw needs some alignment.

There’s a difference between flat and surfaced ;-) A jointer makes a surface flat. This is what you’re trying to achieve with the sanding. A planer makes a board uniform thickness. So a curved board going into a planer will come out curved, but equal thickness.

BUT – in your case its really not that critical. You should be able to clamp out any minor gaps with strips that thin as long as the edges are uniform. How are you clamping them?

If you’re still seeing gaps after planing & clamping, this can be caused by sniping by the planer, where the ends are a bit thinner than the rest.

So get that table saw aligned, get a good quality glue line rip blade and you should be good to go.

-- Everything is a prototype thats why its one of a kind!!

View AbbyL's profile

AbbyL

12 posts in 317 days


#17 posted 02-01-2018 04:10 PM

When I did that, using the clamps and pressing the gaps closed when I unclamp they separate some. When I ran them through the planer the gaps just got bigger. Some of my boards just fell apart after running them though. Here is an example of one of my boards with the gaps

View Steve's profile

Steve

753 posts in 784 days


#18 posted 02-01-2018 04:26 PM

not enough glue perhaps also?

View AbbyL's profile

AbbyL

12 posts in 317 days


#19 posted 02-01-2018 04:28 PM

I over glue mine. I have a sloppy mess when done clamping. Is it possible I’m over clamping?

View EarlS's profile

EarlS

1932 posts in 2550 days


#20 posted 02-01-2018 05:45 PM

Is your glue new? Any chance it froze or has been sitting for a long time. I have to say I’ve never heard of gaps getting wider after glue and clamps, especially if you have squeeze out.

How long are you leaving them clamped? I usually go for at least 8 hours, and better, overnight. You might also try Gorilla Glue (polyurethane) otherwise Titebond II is the standard that most of us use.

While over clamping is possible, in practice, it is pretty hard to over clamp a glue joint.

-- Earl "I'm a pessamist - generally that increases the chance that things will turn out better than expected"

View knotscott's profile (online now)

knotscott

8149 posts in 3578 days


#21 posted 02-01-2018 09:51 PM

Great joints come from flat, straight, square stock. Start with a flat reference face, which is most easily achieved with a jointer, but can also be achieved with a planer using a planer sled. Then square an adjacent edge, also most effectively and easily done with a jointer, but if you have a flat reference face, a consistent square edge can also be effectively done with a jig and a table saw or router. If you skip the flattening step, and try to square an edge, it won’t necessarily be a consistent 90° throughout the length of the board.

Lots of folks have different techniques, but that’s the way the Norm Abrams, David Marks, and many other very successful woodworkers dimension their stock.

-- Happiness is like wetting your pants...everyone can see it, but only you can feel the warmth....

View AbbyL's profile

AbbyL

12 posts in 317 days


#22 posted 02-02-2018 03:38 AM

I use titebond 3 it was outside in 25 degree weather. It is new. I got it maybe 1 1/2 months ago.i have done testing on the boards from 45m to 24h all the same result. And the options with getting a level/flat surface with expensive tools isn’t gonna work bc I don’t have them. I have to work with what I have. Which is a thickness planer and a sander. The glue wasn’t out in the cold on my first ones which had the gaps still. I called the glue company and they told me if you can see light through the boards then the joint wouldn’t be a good joint. Therefore it can cause it to gap. So I understand why I’m having this issue. If there is a bad joint then the joint won’t last which makes since on it trying to come apart or even breaking off when going through the thickness planer. I’m trying to make good quality boards without the glue covering up a hole. Some of my boards where warped. Now I know I need more tools. Just can’t do it now. So I think I’ll stick to using sandpaper laid out on a flat surface.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8523 posts in 2779 days


#23 posted 02-02-2018 03:57 AM

^ Public Domain

Veritas edge plane works for me.
http://www.leevalley.com/us/wood/page.aspx?p=54862&cat=1,41182,48945

View AbbyL's profile

AbbyL

12 posts in 317 days


#24 posted 02-02-2018 04:02 AM

It looks cool. But dose it work for surfacing or just getting a flat surface

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8523 posts in 2779 days


#25 posted 02-02-2018 04:28 AM

Just for the edge, it worked well for my butcher block

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8523 posts in 2779 days


#26 posted 02-02-2018 04:37 AM

Thanks to OSU55’s blog, http://lumberjocks.com/OSU55/blog/39501, I learned how to fine tune the chip breaker ^ after which I flattened the butcher block.

View AbbyL's profile

AbbyL

12 posts in 317 days


#27 posted 02-02-2018 11:16 AM

Yeah that looks amazing. Well done.

View waho6o9's profile

waho6o9

8523 posts in 2779 days


#28 posted 02-02-2018 01:24 PM

Thank you

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