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View cowboyup3371's profile

Forstner Bit or Hole Saw?

by cowboyup3371
posted 01-11-2018 04:20 AM


8 replies so far

View Woodknack's profile

Woodknack

12227 posts in 2462 days


#1 posted 01-11-2018 04:32 AM

I usually only use hole saws to make wood circles for wheels, knobs, etc.; or on occasionally if I need a hole larger than my Forstners. A good quality hole saw will cut metal.

-- Rick M, http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View woodbutcherbynight's profile

woodbutcherbynight

5488 posts in 2491 days


#2 posted 01-11-2018 04:34 AM

Both will get the job done, of the two the Forstner is more accurate IMHO. The Forstner bit allows you to make a hole with a flat bottom, the hole saw cannot do this. For precision work I use a Forstner bit up to 2 1/2 inches, the largest that I have in my set. After that it is hole saw time.

If you do use the hole saw save the inner waste parts. These come in handy for all kinds of spacers and other odd jigs and such.

-- Live to tell the stories, they sound better that way.

View runswithscissors's profile

runswithscissors

2804 posts in 2107 days


#3 posted 01-15-2018 01:08 AM

I find hole saws wobble on their arbors, making a precisely sized hole difficult. I’d be curious if anyone knows of an arbor that fixes this problem.

-- I admit to being an adrenaline junky; fortunately, I'm very easily frightened

View TheFridge's profile

TheFridge

9856 posts in 1568 days


#4 posted 01-15-2018 01:22 AM



I find hole saws wobble on their arbors, making a precisely sized hole difficult. I d be curious if anyone knows of an arbor that fixes this problem.

- runswithscissors

Most aren’t meant to be precise. Maybe a starrett kit. That’s all I got.

-- Shooting down the walls of heartache. Bang bang. I am. The warrior.

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

4894 posts in 2433 days


#5 posted 01-15-2018 01:23 AM

I will always use a Forstner bit if I can, because I get a cleaner cut.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View cowboyup3371's profile

cowboyup3371

59 posts in 279 days


#6 posted 01-15-2018 01:33 AM

I used my forstner bit but I wish I didn’t have to deal with the small point on the end. I had to go deep enough for the hole coming down from the top to meet up right but the bit’s point barely poked through the other side. The outside edge of the box will be hid but I need to figure out a better way for future projects

-- Cowboy Up or Quit - If you are going to quit than get out of my way

View William Shelley's profile

William Shelley

576 posts in 1551 days


#7 posted 01-15-2018 01:35 AM

I have yet to find a hole saw with the proper sized gullets for drilling anything thicker than about 1/4” material. Everything I’ve seen has small gullets which clog up almost immediately with packed sawdust.

And you wouldn’t necessarily use a forstner bit on really thin material. So that’s my reccomendation, not based on size but based on thickness of material to be drilled through; thin – hole saw, thick – forstner bit.

Obviously forstner bits cannot drill through metal, so this advice pertains to wood drilling only.

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective

View William Shelley's profile

William Shelley

576 posts in 1551 days


#8 posted 01-15-2018 01:38 AM



I used my forstner bit but I wish I didn t have to deal with the small point on the end. I had to go deep enough for the hole coming down from the top to meet up right but the bit s point barely poked through the other side. The outside edge of the box will be hid but I need to figure out a better way for future projects

- cowboyup3371

If you had a beefy drill press with good bearings and such, you could try chucking an endmill and “finishing” the hole with that. I’d probably go with a 2 or 3-flute not a 4-flute. Make sure to clamp your workpiece really well because the endmill has nothing to keep it centered on the hole – that’s kind of the point, they’re for lateral milling not drilling. But some have the correct geometry to be used for both.

-- Woodworking from an engineer's perspective

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