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View JohnMcClure's profile

Bought a 22" wooden plane, got a couple questions

by JohnMcClure
posted 01-01-2018 03:09 AM


12 replies so far

View JayT's profile

JayT

5862 posts in 2355 days


#1 posted 01-01-2018 03:49 AM

22” for a wooden plane is likely a fore or jointer, depending on how you set it up. A bit long for a jack. Not sure on the iron, there were quite a few makers. Extremely unlikely it has any collector value.

Most wooden planes do not have knobs. The rounded part up front is a strike button. You tap the iron with a plane hammer to extend it and take a deeper cut. The strike button is tapped while holding the plane in the other hand to retract the iron slightly or struck harder to loosen the iron and wedge. It works on inertia and using the strike button saves the body of the plane from getting too banged up from the hammer.

-- In matters of style, swim with the current; in matters of principle, stand like a rock. Thomas Jefferson

View Don W's profile

Don W

18959 posts in 2711 days


#2 posted 01-01-2018 01:10 PM

The blade could be marked Sargent. They did sell wood planes. They did not make them however. Most were actually made by Sandusky.

If it’s a Sargent plane it will have a marketing on the toe. If it’s just a Sargent blade with no Mark, you may never know.

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

View JohnMcClure's profile

JohnMcClure

251 posts in 784 days


#3 posted 01-02-2018 01:03 AM

Thank you both, that was very helpful. Don, the toe does have a Sargent stamp. Below the stamp appears to be the number 17, or possibly G17. There may have been more there at one time – it’s hard to make out.
Any idea what model number or category this 22” plane may be? or way to estimate production date? Just so I know what I have.

-- I'd rather be a hammer than a nail

View Don W's profile

Don W

18959 posts in 2711 days


#4 posted 01-02-2018 02:01 AM

I haven’t looked into the wood bodies planes sold by Sargent very deeply, but here is what I have in my book. It may help you find something.

-- http://timetestedtools.net - Collecting is an investment in the past, and the future.

View corelz125's profile

corelz125

542 posts in 1120 days


#5 posted 01-02-2018 02:25 AM

To get clean off the grit and grime steel wool and denatured alcohol work pretty good.

View JohnMcClure's profile

JohnMcClure

251 posts in 784 days


#6 posted 01-02-2018 11:58 PM

Thanks. Don, thanks for that page – the stamp on the iron and toe of the plane are exactly like the ones in that photo. I can reasonably infer that my plane was produced between 1871 and 1922, which is better than knowing nothing!

-- I'd rather be a hammer than a nail

View socrbent's profile

socrbent

643 posts in 2413 days


#7 posted 01-03-2018 04:31 AM

Amazing – Your plane looks much like 2 Ohio Tool Co. planes I have. See the photos in these blog posts – http://lumberjocks.com/socrbent/blog/30793 and http://lumberjocks.com/socrbent/blog/30684

Coincidentally I was finally starting making new totes and a wedge for them today.

-- socrbent Ohio

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 791 days


#8 posted 01-03-2018 12:07 PM



Other than rust removal and sharpening, I plan to scrape or sand the body, flatten the bottom if necessary, and get to using it. Anything else I should be thinking about or doing to it?

- JohnMcClure

John, I would definitely spend the time to flatten the bottom via whatever means necessary. As to the remainder of the plane I would simply use a plane polish to clean it up, leaving the patina. The polish I use is one part boiled linseed oil, one part Murphy’s Oil Soap, and two parts bees wax. Just rub this concoction all over and it will remove the dirt and grime. I use this on my planes every couple of months.

Bees wax = bees wax candle, grated, mixed with turpentine to soften to the consistency of room temperature butter.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7770 posts in 3058 days


#9 posted 01-03-2018 01:18 PM




Other than rust removal and sharpening, I plan to scrape or sand the body, flatten the bottom if necessary, and get to using it. Anything else I should be thinking about or doing to it?
- JohnMcClure

John, I would definitely spend the time to flatten the bottom via whatever means necessary. As to the remainder of the plane I would simply use a plane polish to clean it up, leaving the patina. The polish I use is one part boiled linseed oil, one part Murphy s Oil Soap, and two parts bees wax. Just rub this concoction all over and it will remove the dirt and grime. I use this on my planes every couple of months.
Bees wax = bees wax candle, grated, mixed with turpentine to soften to the consistency of room temperature butter.
- Ron Aylor

I flattened my wooden plane on the jointer, working against the twist I had. Be careful to take minimal cuts and measure the mouth opening after every pass, seriously. If you absolutely have to, you could probably shim the rear of the plane’s mouth with very thin veneer. Doing that, however, could possibly make the wedge more difficult to use. Bottom line, go as slow as you can while flattening… Good luck!

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 791 days


#10 posted 01-03-2018 01:33 PM


I flattened my wooden plane on the jointer, working against the twist I had. Be careful to take minimal cuts and measure the mouth opening after every pass, seriously.

- HorizontalMike

If you get too carried away … you might have to patch it as I had to on this coffin smoother.
 

View JohnMcClure's profile

JohnMcClure

251 posts in 784 days


#11 posted 01-03-2018 02:14 PM

Thanks all for the tips! Ron, I hadn’t thought about preserving the 100-year-old patina, but you’re right – I’ll try your concoction.
Not having a jointer, I’ll probably glue sandpaper to a flat piece of plywood and rub vigorously… pencil marks to show any low spots… unless y’all say otherwise.

-- I'd rather be a hammer than a nail

View Ron Aylor's profile

Ron Aylor

2649 posts in 791 days


#12 posted 01-04-2018 12:16 AM



Thanks all for the tips! Ron, I hadn t thought about preserving the 100-year-old patina, but you re right – I ll try your concoction.
Not having a jointer, I ll probably glue sandpaper to a flat piece of plywood and rub vigorously… pencil marks to show any low spots… unless y all say otherwise.

- JohnMcClure

John, I think the sandpaper to a flat surface sounds like the way to go … just keep an eye on the mouth! Good luck and have fun! Of course, you will have to show more photos when you are done!

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