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View gdiddy13's profile

Where to start, and recommendations for jointer

by gdiddy13
posted 12-12-2017 08:01 PM


40 replies so far

View jonah's profile

jonah

1696 posts in 3295 days


#1 posted 12-12-2017 08:29 PM

There’s little to nothing in the way of new jointers that fit your budget and requirements. There are a few benchtop models, but they’re pretty chincy. The possible exception is the Cutech jointer, which is supposedly decent.

You can definitely find a good 6” jointer on the used market for a lot less than $500, and anything can be put on a mobile base. Look for a longer bed Craftsman, Delta, Jet, Grizzly, or generic import jointer. You should expect to pay anywhere from $150-$300, depending on condition. Ultimately, all cast iron jointers are pretty similar, so don’t be sucked in by some overpriced 20-year-old Powermatic 6” that someone wants to sell for $500.

View Lazyman's profile

Lazyman

1952 posts in 1384 days


#2 posted 12-13-2017 05:36 AM

Bigger is better but if space is limited a benchtop model can actually work pretty well. I bought a Porter Cable bench top jointer off of Craigslist for about $125 and it has handled everything I’ve thrown at it. I had to put some new knives on it but I have used it to mill some rock hard hickory from a dead tree and it left a finish like glass. If you are going to use it frequently, that might not be the way to go but if you can find one cheap, you can probably sell it for what you paid for it when you are ready to upgrade.

-- Nathan, TX -- Hire the lazy man. He may not do as much work but that's because he will find a better way.

View Loren's profile

Loren

10383 posts in 3644 days


#3 posted 12-13-2017 05:43 AM

I’m not that picky. Most any used 6”
jointer will do, though some have longer
beds and there’s some variation in fence
designs that can be a factor if you need
to move the fence a lot. For most work
you won’t.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

4132 posts in 2306 days


#4 posted 12-13-2017 05:43 AM


There s little to nothing in the way of new jointers that fit your budget and requirements. There are a few benchtop models, but they re pretty chincy. The possible exception is the Cutech jointer, which is supposedly decent.

You can definitely find a good 6” jointer on the used market for a lot less than $500, and anything can be put on a mobile base. Look for a longer bed Craftsman, Delta, Jet, Grizzly, or generic import jointer. You should expect to pay anywhere from $150-$300, depending on condition. Ultimately, all cast iron jointers are pretty similar, so don t be sucked in by some overpriced 20-year-old Powermatic 6” that someone wants to sell for $500.

- jonah


Good advice but…....I’d be looking at an 8”.

That being said, a 6” would be fine if you are make small projects like your cutting boards. If you expand to larger project I think you better with some wider than 6”. I have went through 4 jointer over time, each one wider. Now up to 16’’ wide and loving it.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View jonah's profile

jonah

1696 posts in 3295 days


#5 posted 12-13-2017 12:04 PM

I agree that 8” is a much better size, but he’s going to have a much harder time finding an 8” jointer while staying within his budget.

View gdiddy13's profile

gdiddy13

59 posts in 740 days


#6 posted 12-14-2017 12:13 PM

I’ve found this guy. What do you guys think? https://cleveland.craigslist.org/tls/6393187530.html

View ScottKaye's profile

ScottKaye

643 posts in 1950 days


#7 posted 12-14-2017 12:22 PM

here's a Steelex- (made by the same factory that does grizzly and shopfox) for $661.25 shipped. its an off brand. but its new and basically the same machine that grizzly and shopfox sell for a whole lot less.

-- "Nothing happens until you build it"

View msinc's profile

msinc

382 posts in 500 days


#8 posted 12-14-2017 12:44 PM

I just got another good joiner. I was out of woodworking for a while and previously had a 6” Grizzly. It did everything I needed it to do. I wasn’t really working with long boards back then. My new one has a much longer table and I am glad it does because I have had to use it on some longer stuff. You really need a longer table if at all possible. Hold off until you have the cabbage to get it. If you need to make long boards straight you will absolutely need a long table or you could end up wasting a lot of wood. Even with boards that are not so long, it sure makes it easy.
I am not sure why or what you guys are doing to need a wider than 6” joiner…..whatever it is, I haven’t had to do it yet and I am 56 years old. Don’t get me wrong, I am happy that all you guys have the joiner you want. I just cant figure out what it is that you are doing with the thing. I have never had a board in my hand or a project in my shop yet that I had to stop and abort for lack of a larger than six inch joiner. I mean, are you guys using it as a planer or what?? Building life size wooden battleship replicas…what??

View jonah's profile

jonah

1696 posts in 3295 days


#9 posted 12-14-2017 12:56 PM

Lots of lumber turns out to be between six and eight inches wide. In order to joint the face of such a board, you need a 8” or wider jointer.

View weathersfuori's profile

weathersfuori

90 posts in 1126 days


#10 posted 12-14-2017 04:24 PM

I recently made the jump to a new 8” Steelex jointer from a craigslist-purchased 6” Delta. It really is surprising how much difference that extra 2” makes. As Jonah mentioned, a lot of the rough lumber I get is at or just over 6” wide and it definitely makes it harder to pick through boards at the lumber yard to get good, narrower boards when you can only joint up to 6”. For the projects I’ve done with the new jointer, it has also meant less waste. That said, the projects I have done are two doors and a dining table, so bigger is obviously better. I could see how a 6” or even a bench top would be more than okay for small projects like cutting boards.

The 6” Delta 37-196 I got on craigslist didn’t have too big a footprint, was on a mobile base (I think those came with one?), and had great dust collection… I think I paid $220 for it. It was plenty big enough until I started making 8-9 ft. doors! If bigger projects like that or a table are in your future, I’d hold out for the bigger jointer. Otherwise, look for a deal on a used 6” like I used to have and I think you’d be just fine.

-- Weathersfuori, Texas, www.facebook.com/f5creations

View joey502's profile

joey502

535 posts in 1515 days


#11 posted 12-14-2017 06:54 PM

A jointer is a fantastic addition to your workshop. Your projects will improve immediately with the ability to flatten and square your material.

There is a ridgid jointer listed in Youngstown, oh for $375. No pic but the seller claims it is barely used so it should hopefully be in good shape. I have that jointer and have been very happy with it. The knives can be purchased for under $20/ set online. The tables are each 24” long, giving you plenty of length for small to midsize projects. It is a 120 volt machine, in case 240v is not available in your space now.

I think the price is fair but would try to get the best deal possible for yourself. I would pass if it looks too neglected, more 6” models will come up in that price range.

View joey502's profile

joey502

535 posts in 1515 days


#12 posted 12-14-2017 06:57 PM

You should able to recoup most if not all of the cost down the road if you decide to move up to a bigger machine.

View Dustin's profile

Dustin

503 posts in 737 days


#13 posted 12-14-2017 08:36 PM



Lots of lumber turns out to be between six and eight inches wide. In order to joint the face of such a board, you need a 8” or wider jointer.

- jonah

Agreed that this is necessary to do it conveniently (I’d certainly have an 8” if it had been in the budget), but there are work arounds.

My first attempt to work around the width limitation was a planer sled based off of the FWW design. This thing was heavy, cumbersome, and a PITA to setup. I’d skip this if at all possible.

My current solution comes from (I think) Jay Bates. I use a fixed platform made from melamine on the bed of my planer about 6-7” wide. I then run the wider board over my jointer a few passes, which leaves a noticeable lip. This lip gets butted up against the edge of that platform, and the planer flattens the opposite side. You can then flip it to remove the lip and plane to final thickness.

Warning if using this method, though: you do generally have to remove more material from the board in order to flatten and plane it. If it is severly twisted, or insufficiently thick, you could have problems getting the desired final thickness.

-- "Ladies, if your husband says he'll get to it, he'll get to it. No need to remind him about it every 6 months."

View skatefriday's profile

skatefriday

416 posts in 1479 days


#14 posted 12-14-2017 09:16 PM



Bigger is better but if space is limited a benchtop model can actually work pretty well. I bought a Porter Cable bench top jointer off of Craigslist for about $125 and it has handled everything I ve thrown at it. I had to put some new knives on it but I have used it to mill some rock hard hickory from a dead tree and it left a finish like glass. If you are going to use it frequently, that might not be the way to go but if you can find one cheap, you can probably sell it for what you paid for it when you are ready to upgrade.

- Lazyman

Did you buy mine? I hated the thing, sold it on craigslist and bought one the G0813. Much happier now.

View jerkylips's profile

jerkylips

409 posts in 2567 days


#15 posted 12-14-2017 09:29 PM

it took some searching, but I recently found this one, used, for $350 including the mobile base. I’d been looking for a while & can say that around here at least, 6” are about 100x more common than 8” on craigslist.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

4132 posts in 2306 days


#16 posted 12-14-2017 09:35 PM


I just got another good joiner. I was out of woodworking for a while and previously had a 6” Grizzly. It did everything I needed it to do. I wasn t really working with long boards back then. My new one has a much longer table and I am glad it does because I have had to use it on some longer stuff. You really need a longer table if at all possible. Hold off until you have the cabbage to get it. If you need to make long boards straight you will absolutely need a long table or you could end up wasting a lot of wood. Even with boards that are not so long, it sure makes it easy.
I am not sure why or what you guys are doing to need a wider than 6” joiner…..whatever it is, I haven t had to do it yet and I am 56 years old. Don t get me wrong, I am happy that all you guys have the joiner you want. I just cant figure out what it is that you are doing with the thing. I have never had a board in my hand or a project in my shop yet that I had to stop and abort for lack of a larger than six inch joiner. I mean, are you guys using it as a planer or what?? Building life size wooden battleship replicas…what??

- msinc


Did you know you can glue two of more boards together and face joint them flat and ever on a wide jointer.
Did you know that with a wide jointer you can skew a piece stock at and angle effectively creating a shearing action to help with difficult grain.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View bbasiaga's profile

bbasiaga

1232 posts in 1992 days


#17 posted 12-14-2017 11:39 PM

The jointer size thing is one that seems to scare a lot of newbies away.

The real truth is this: no matter how wide your jointer, you will find a board that won’t fit.

-- Part of engineering is to know when to put your calculator down and pick up your tools.

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

216 posts in 1099 days


#18 posted 12-14-2017 11:53 PM

I too fail to see the need for a jointer wider than 6”. My little shop (to say nothing of my budget) could not accommodate anything bigger. For years, I have used my planer with an auxiliary sled. My sled is covered with plastic laminate. I stabilize a warped or twisted board on it with little wedges and glue everything down with several spots of hot melt glue. Then run it through the planer enough times to make it mostly flat on the top side and then pop it off and finish planing both sides. The hot melt pops right off with an old chisel.

Most boards ultimately get cut into smaller components anyway. If a board is so badly warped or twisted that planing in one piece will waste too much, I will rough cut it up ahead of time.

View AlmostRetired's profile

AlmostRetired

211 posts in 711 days


#19 posted 12-15-2017 07:39 AM

I’m running into the same problem as some of the other guys here. I have a benchtop 6” that is not big (or long) enough for the stuff I m trying to throw at it.

I have been looking at the Grizzly 8’ with parallelogram tables and spiral cutterhead. As this is a hobby, right now, I am having a hard time dropping the $1300 for it, is it worth it?

Roger

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

216 posts in 1099 days


#20 posted 12-15-2017 04:40 PM

As another hobbyist, not in my opinion. See post #18 above.

View jonah's profile

jonah

1696 posts in 3295 days


#21 posted 12-15-2017 04:56 PM

Planer sleds are a complete PITA. I had one, along with a table saw sled for edge jointing. They were horrible.

It made milling take about twice as long as it does with a jointer and planer.

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

216 posts in 1099 days


#22 posted 12-15-2017 06:34 PM

Are they less convenient? Yes. Are they slower? Probably. Are they functional and cost effective? Definitely. Are they horrible and a complete PITA? Not even close. How many hobbyists would love to have a huge production shop with every power tool imaginable available? I would guess, all of us. However, when space and dollars are at a premium, one tends to trade for something less convenient that you can afford like a jig. I have saved and used a lot of warped and twisted cherry lumber with my sled that might have otherwise been wasted. IMO, as a hobbyist, when it comes to spending $1300 for a 12” jointer or making a planer sled, the sled wins hands down.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

4132 posts in 2306 days


#23 posted 12-15-2017 07:27 PM


Planer sleds are a complete PITA. I had one, along with a table saw sled for edge jointing. They were horrible.

It made milling take about twice as long as it does with a jointer and planer.

- jonah

Amen to that. I want to enjoy my hobby. I what to make project not mess with all the work around and spend tons of time building time consuming paraphernalia.

That being said, each to their own.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View jonah's profile

jonah

1696 posts in 3295 days


#24 posted 12-15-2017 07:34 PM

Nobody is advocating a $1300 12” jointer. A $400-$500 used 8” jointer is what we’re talking about. Your straw man argument about a production shop and 12” jointers is not even close to what people are recommending here.

In my experience, which includes a planer and table saw sled as well as 6” and 8” jointers, the 8” jointer is a good fit for most shops. It takes up only a little more space than a 6” yet can flexibly handle a lot more of the hardwood we tend to find. Sure, it costs more than a 6” model, but not an order of magnitude more.

View gdiddy13's profile

gdiddy13

59 posts in 740 days


#25 posted 12-15-2017 08:20 PM

I’m with you guys. I have the jigs for my saw and planer. But it’s taking too much time and a PITA. I’m trying to find a good balance between producing pieces to be sold and having fun doing it. So I’m not gonna turn out hundreds of things, but it’s taking too long and good tedious without a jointer at this point.

View gdiddy13's profile

gdiddy13

59 posts in 740 days


#26 posted 12-15-2017 08:24 PM

View brtech's profile

brtech

1029 posts in 2919 days


#27 posted 12-15-2017 09:25 PM

Looks great. If the beds are flat, the fence is square, and the adjustments all work, I think it will be just what you were looking for. The thing I would be concerned about is knives. Does someone make knives that fit in this machine and are they reasonably priced? Generally, old iron is good iron. Parts are always an issue with old iron, but there really isn’t a lot to go wrong on a planer that works when you got it. If knives aren’t an issue, take a straightedge and a good square with you and test it out.

View skatefriday's profile

skatefriday

416 posts in 1479 days


#28 posted 12-15-2017 09:38 PM



Planer sleds are a complete PITA. I had one, along with a table saw sled for edge jointing. They were horrible.

It made milling take about twice as long as it does with a jointer and planer.

- jonah

My progression was planer sled → Worthless Porter Cable benchtop → Grizzly 6”.

I’m happy enough now and don’t anticipate any further transitions in the near term. The 6” built my kitchen cabinet face frames, drawer fronts, and doors. Good enough…

View bilyo's profile

bilyo

216 posts in 1099 days


#29 posted 12-15-2017 11:35 PM


Nobody is advocating a $1300 12” jointer. A $400-$500 used 8” jointer is what we re talking about. Your straw man argument about a production shop and 12” jointers is not even close to what people are recommending here.
- jonah

AlmostRetired (post #19) asked for advice on spending $1300 on an 8” Jointer. Sorry, I misquoted saying 12” instead of 8”. However, I stand by my opinion that planer sleds don’t deserve the disparagement they are receiving here. I’ve seen plans for some that are unnecessarily complicated. Mine is a simple torsion box with a plastic laminate top that required little in time and materials to build. And, with it, I can easily flatten a wide board up the 12 1/2” capacity of my planer. I’m not suggesting that it is a total substitute for a jointer, only that the extra cost for a large jointer may not be necessary depending on the kind of work you are doing.

“Each to his own”. Of course, I agree. However, if someone says he is a hobbyist with limited space and funds, then for flattening wide boards my advice would be as above. At least, try it before you lay down your hard earned dollars. I have an older Delta 6” and I find it more than adequate. I think gdiddy13’s choice above is a good one contingent on checks brtech suggested.

View ccc118's profile

ccc118

7 posts in 171 days


#30 posted 12-16-2017 01:21 PM

I have a Grizzly 6” G0813 that I have been happy with. It has much longer tables than a bench top jointer. It is true that a lot of rough sawn lumber is wider than 6”, so you will have to deal with that, but most projects I’m doing don’t tend to have parts wider than that anyway. I just break boards down to smaller parts prior to jointing. The problem is that once you step up to an 8”, they’re nearly double the price, double the weight, and run on 220v. I couldn’t imagine trying to get a 500-600lb machine down into my basement, so I went with a lighter 6” one. Also I don’t have 220v so that would be an extra expense to add for me.

View jonah's profile

jonah

1696 posts in 3295 days


#31 posted 12-16-2017 02:15 PM

Most older 8” jointers come with 1-1.5HP motors and can run on 120VAC. My PM 60, for example, is from the 70s and has a 1HP motor. It can run on either voltage. Starting in about the ‘80s-’90s they began coming with 2HP 240V motors.

View Charlie H.'s profile

Charlie H.

180 posts in 647 days


#32 posted 12-16-2017 03:13 PM

After woodworking in some capacity off/on for 45 years (still consider myself advanced beginner) I finally added a short bed 6” Ridgid jointer to the tool crib.
I am really looking forward to getting it assembled and shoehorning it into the garage workshop.
Some areas of the country seem to be rich with used woodworking tools being readily available, but I looked at classified ads for the past two years and all I found was a bunch of worn out, or rusted junkers, along with a couple of very overpriced machines that were in good condition.
Then a few weeks ago I found a Ridgid jointer new in box and I paid $400.
I figure it will be like the rest of my tools, 99% of the time I will be completely satisfied but on occasion I will wish for bigger/better, just like I sometimes wish I had a 12” tablesaw or a really great bandsaw.
I guess it depends on what you actually need, if you are going to mill a lot of large boards you need a large machine, if you are going to mostly build jewelry boxes the 6” machine will be great.

-- Regards, Charlie --------I talk to myself, because sometimes I need expert advice.---------

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

942 posts in 813 days


#33 posted 12-16-2017 09:40 PM

I owned a 6 inch, low cost Ridgid jointer for over 10 years and seldom wished for more. The nature of my work has changed and I now use a 12” jointer/planer combination machine. I couldn’t do with less. The point is don’t buy what you don’t know if you will need right off the bat. I have seen a lot of used Delta, Rockwell and Ridgid jointers for sale for in the $300 range. If you can find a deal like that where you live, I suggest that as an alternative. If you are making small stuff, Porter Cable sells a table top unit for less than $300 that will work fine for short 3 or 4 foot pieces. I have seen one in action and it worked fine for its owner.

View AlaskaGuy's profile

AlaskaGuy

4132 posts in 2306 days


#34 posted 12-16-2017 09:49 PM



I owned a 6 inch, low cost Ridgid jointer for over 10 years and seldom wished for more. The nature of my work has changed and I now use a 12” jointer/planer combination machine. I couldn t do with less. The point is don t buy what you don t know if you will need right off the bat. I have seen a lot of used Delta, Rockwell and Ridgid jointers for sale for in the $300 range. If you can find a deal like that where you live, I suggest that as an alternative. If you are making small stuff, Porter Cable sells a table top unit for less than $300 that will work fine for short 3 or 4 foot pieces. I have seen one in action and it worked fine for its owner.

- ArtMann

Make sure you buy some very good ear protection in you buy a bench top.

-- Alaskan's for Global warming!

View jonah's profile

jonah

1696 posts in 3295 days


#35 posted 12-16-2017 10:43 PM

I wouldn’t describe the Ridgid 6” jointer as “short bed.” I consider “short bed” to be those craftsman and delta models from 40-80 years ago, where the bed is only as long as the fence. The Ridgid I believe has a ~50” bed.

View gdiddy13's profile

gdiddy13

59 posts in 740 days


#36 posted 12-16-2017 11:54 PM

View ArtMann's profile

ArtMann

942 posts in 813 days


#37 posted 12-17-2017 12:33 AM


Make sure you buy some very good ear protection in you buy a bench top.

- AlaskaGuy

Yeah, that too!

View gdiddy13's profile

gdiddy13

59 posts in 740 days


#38 posted 12-17-2017 11:19 PM

Going to pick up this guy tomorrow! https://cleveland.craigslist.org/tls/d/grizzly-6-jointer/6428990262.html

Any tips on cleaning it up?

View jonah's profile

jonah

1696 posts in 3295 days


#39 posted 12-17-2017 11:44 PM

A green scotch brite pad under a random orbital sander combined with some mild acid or WD40 can help with the elbow grease required to remove the rust. Better still would be de-rusting with evapo-rust, but that’s difficult on something the size of a jointer.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

7756 posts in 2911 days


#40 posted 12-18-2017 01:24 PM

I got lucky when first looking for my first jointer. Within a one hour drive, I found an 8in. Grizzly G0593 for $700. What I loved about the jointer other than the spiral head cutter, was the actual table dimensions that were 75in. long x 9-1/2in. wide. Taking the guard off, I could, and did, joint rough cut boards that were +10in. wide, by rotating 180 every pass (with minimal cuts). It was enough to be able to use my lunchbox planer to finish the job.

I still cut boards down to 5-6in. in order to minimize cupping over time. I am retired and 65, so I will never need or desire anything bigger. A once in a lifetime purchase, instead of stair stepping up over time. Just my 2-cents worth… Your mileage may vary.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

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