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Reply by therealSteveN

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Posted on Milling troublesome stock

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therealSteveN

1692 posts in 776 days


#1 posted 11-08-2018 09:32 PM

Is the stock still square, or have you already cut the leg tapers? If it is still square stock, how well does it lie flat when you cut a piece 1” longer than your legs need to be? Is it dead flat? Is it pretty flat, or is it trying to walk back to the woods?

All I can do is tell you how I would do it.

STEP1 Cut to Rough Length

STEP2 Cut to Rough Width If the board is amenable I’ll do this on TS, if not I usually use a BS to rip for rough width

Doing both of above first sections the boards into the smallest sized boards you can use. This goes a long way to decrease any cup, twist, or bow you may have.

STEP 3 Face-Jointing Here picking which side is going to be the one that will come closest to contacting the joiner bed on all 4 corners. You don’t want to put the curve of a potato chip down and start making passes where soon you will have jointed away all of the middle, and be left with two outside pieces. Instead you can put the board up on high edges, and work just those down till flat. Hopefully your stock isn’t so cupped, bowed, and twisted you need any of this to be extreme. Sometimes though if you want 1 1/2” legs, and start with 2” stock that is wildly twisted you could run out of wood before you were square.

STEP 4 Joint one edge. Sounds pretty easy, but can get weird depending on your fence not being at 90* or having a wane edge on both sides, SEE item 2…. when cutting to width you need something that can be easily jointed.

STEP 5 Plane for thickness, ALWAYS pre jointed side DOWN, you want to take the first passes off the non jointed side. When flat, swap each pass until you reach the proper thickness.

STEP 6 Rip to final width.

If your stock will lay flat on a known flat surface and you get no light under after you cut to length, just go straight to the planer if all you need is a smaller size of the perfect looking wood you have. With S4S Stock it can happen, maybe not often, but it can.

-- Think safe, be safe


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