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Posted on Using a Fibonacci Gauge for Wood Turning

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Wildwood

1168 posts in 853 days


#1 posted 09-12-2012 11:07 AM

If understand rule of thirds or breaking size of elements into thirds Fibonacci gauge works well on most turnings. On large bowls and hollow forms may exceed capability of your gauge unless flip-flop.

You can open or close your gauge on a piece of wood mounted on lathe to show you length, width, and height of an element in relation to other elements. You can measure points of gauge with a ruler and record them in mind or on paper.
Russ explains rule of thirds, with bowl as example. Use your gauge to determine dimensions for your project.

http://www.woodturner-russ.com/Design-2.html

Open gauge, measure & mark where want stuff to be, turn and check with gauge. What no math required?
Other than using a ruler to measure points on gauge and wood guess not.

Do not need the quage to figure thirds, but does make it easier and fun to play with. So just have fun with it.

-- Bill


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