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Reply by Jeremy Greiner

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Posted on Gaps in the final glue up for endgrain cutting boards

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Jeremy Greiner

568 posts in 1462 days


#1 posted 08-12-2012 01:35 AM

Hey this is an old thread, and I forgot to answer the question asked of me ..

If a board is bowed/cupped across the width, all you have to do is make sure that the board will rest against the reference surface without rocking, some quick sanding of the corners can ensure that. With that you can slide it through the drum sander like the picture below taking light passes, and it will slowly shave off the top until it is flat as the reference surface.

Then you can flip and remove the cup.

There are exceptions to this, if the item is too thin, and pressure is applied it will be pushed down before the sanding or cutter head can shave off the top. This is more noticeable on planers because they have the rollers that apply a good amount of downward force on a board. Taking very very light passes can help with this.

This doesn’t help with twists, or bows/cups that are across the length of a board (unless the board is short enough to fully fit on the planer/drum sander bed).

Depending on the bow, this can cause the edge to no longer be square to the top/bottom (quick pass through the table saw can fix that, which usually happens anyways to remove glue squeeze out).

As added, I would never ever put an end grain cutting board through a planer. The woodwhisperer posted a blog from a user a while back:
http://www.thewoodwhisperer.com/articles/end-grain-through-the-planer/

But simply put, the planer knives can grab onto the end grain and cause chip out, to the extreme and split the board which can cause all sorts of chaos to happen inside the planer.

I haven’t tried, but I also don’t see why a traditional planer sled that is used for jointing long boards can’t be used for panel glue ups through the drum sander if you have a crazy twist.

If you don’t have a drum sander, building a router planer jig is an excellent and cheap alternative assuming you have a router. It’s messy (unless you have really good dust collection on your router) .. but very effective.

-jeremy

-- Easy to use end grain cutting board designer: http://www.1024studios.com/cuttingboard.html


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