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Call it Rustic, not Crude: The Odyssey, #2: The Travail

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Blog entry by rejo55 posted 04-15-2012 02:28 AM 3035 reads 0 times favorited 6 comments Add to Favorites Watch
« Part 1: The Scenario Part 2 of Call it Rustic, not Crude: The Odyssey, series Part 3: The Prize »

In the first portion of this Odyssey, I didn’t know how to post pics, so I just set the stage as a narrative. Stage #2, The Travail, will, I hope give you some idea of how this thing went together. It seems that the dog ate the early pre-digital camera, pics, so I’ll have to start with the project already well underway.
Scan 15
We were already “spooled up” for the day when a neighbor came in from his work and wanted to nail up a few pieces. We said, “Knock yourself out. We’re gone.” That’s Miss Honey Ma’am in the “white flowerdy” shirt. The lady in the middle is one of our friends who came to see the progress and the other is our neighbor from across the road.
scan 43
The exterior walls are almost completed. The low wall is the beginning of the wall that separates the living room on the right from the kitchen/utility on the left. There will be a vertical timber at the end of this wall to frame the opening over the bar. Notice the vertical 2×4’s braced off against the walls. These were to keep the faces of the timbers flush. Landscape timbers are 3 inches thick, but random width, so we had to decide which face of a wall would be flush and which “wild”. This was in July, with temps in the hundreds and we had to check the braces at least every hour, because the SYP two-by’s would warp in the hot sun.
Scan 7
Another shot of the neighbor, looking from the hall into the master suite. The timbers on the floor are the beginning of a hall wall and a closet in the master suite. We found it best to frame the door and window openings and plumb and brace them before nailing the timbers up, because we could just butt the timbers to the frames to ensure a plumb and square opening. The base row of each wall was nailed through the timber, the sub-floor, and into the floor joist below. They haven’t moved, so far.
Scan 20
The interior walls are almost completed. This is from kitchen across living room to hallway. Another note about the bracing. The braces for the vertical two-by’s were nailed to short 2×4’s that were nailed into the joists with 8 to 10 16d nails and several times the braces pulled the short 2×4’s up from the floor. Man! It was hot!
Scan 5
This is the North wall, showing windows for master bath, guest bath and a third bedroom (my music room, now). The concrete pads and piers are on six-foot centers both ways. This accounts for the 385 sacks of SacCrete that we poured by hand.
Scan 18
The kitchen walls are up and we’re installing ceiling joists and tie beams across living room. These beams will become trusses and a walkway to a loft room. We hadn’t thought about a loft room at this stage, or we would have pitched the roof a little higher.
Scan 24
Looking in the front doorway. The man with his hand on his hip is my best buddy. After MHM and I (mostly her) got the foundation and sub-floor up, his job went on 4×10 hour days and he offered to help on his off-days. We probably would not have made it if not for him. He got laid off a few weeks later, and since he had been driving over 100 miles to work and back every day, he offered to help us dry the house in for $300/week. We jumped at that, and work progressed much more smoothly and faster. When it came time for the ceiling joists, rafters, roof decking and metal roof, he brought his son and the son’s friend (both Houston firefighters) aboard. That was a Godsend, because MHM and I just were not up to that.
Scan 14
I like this shot. Looking down hall to the guest bath in back. The door on right is master suite, the first on left is guest bedroom, which we will furr out and drywall and paper and the second is another bed (my music) room.
Scan 33
From here, the house looks huge! This is the South wall. The small window is above the kitchen sink; the larger one at the “breakfast nook” at end of kitchen. Notice that the outside is “raggedy” looking. That is because the timbers are not all the same width. They are all three inches thick, but range from four to four and a half inches wide. We could only flush one face and let the other run wild. That’s why we call it “rustic” and not ”crude.”
Scan 31
From the kitchen, looking at the rafters, collar ties and knee wall at living room.
Scan 29
Building the trusses to support the cathedral ceiling over the living/dining area. Thirty-eight from front wall to back.
Scan 32
I just love to look up there and see all that wood!
Scan 3
Looking in the living room window at the trusses and walkway. I liked this shot.
Scan 35
Almost dried in. This decking is called Tech-Shield. It has an aluminum coating on the under side. I cost about three dollars more per sheet that OSB, but WELL worth the money. The attic ceiling is not insulated, (but the floor is). We can work in the attic for a couple of hours in July and August (100+ degrees outside) and not break a sweat. Amazing stuff!
Scan 36
This is the shot we’ve been looking for since April!. It is now mid-August. Twenty-six gauge metal roof. I’m getting too old to re-shingle a house and I figger that this will take us out.

After we got the insulated doors and windows in, we had a 2300 square foot, three-bed, two-bath house dried in on an acre of land, and a $5000 aerobic septic system for $12.50 per square foot, including the land and the septic system.

Stay tuned for the GRAND FINALE: The Prize

-- rejo55, East Texas



6 comments so far

View GrandpaLen's profile

GrandpaLen

1543 posts in 938 days


#1 posted 04-15-2012 01:49 PM

Very NICE!

I see in the first picture that with the proper amount of supervision, anything is possible. :-)

Staying tuned for the GRAND FINALE: The Prize. – Len

-- Mother Nature should be proud of what you've done with her tree. - Len ...just north of a stone's throw from the oHIo, river that is, in So. Indiana.

View rejo55's profile

rejo55

175 posts in 908 days


#2 posted 04-15-2012 02:07 PM

Don’t get me started about supervision, Len. You are a grandpa. If your avatar is your photo, you’re old enough to know that if Mama ain’t happy, ain’t nobody happy.

I am sorry I posted this blog before I posted something else with pics. It took me a week to figger out how to post pics. I finally saw how that was done, made liner notes for each pic and uploaded them to Flickr. When they got to Flickr, they were intact, complete with all the explanations of each foto. But, dammit, it wasn’t until I had posted all those pics with the notes, that I discovered that either LJ or Flickr didn’t move the notes. I’m pretty PO’d. Is there any way to put the pics on LJ with notes?

Somebody hep me, hep me, please. I will redo this, but I want to be sure that the notes come with the pics.

Have a good’un

Joe

-- rejo55, East Texas

View Howie's profile

Howie

2656 posts in 1589 days


#3 posted 04-15-2012 02:15 PM

Are those landscape timbers you used? What kind of joinery?
Only way I’ve figured out for the pics/notes is to post the pic 1,2,3 etc and then put notes in the body
1.
2.
etc
Hope that helps

-- Life is good.

View justoneofme's profile

justoneofme

616 posts in 1146 days


#4 posted 04-15-2012 07:50 PM

Wonderful and cozy home you have there, after lots of hard work and supervision, Joe!

As to your queries regarding posting of photos and notes … it took me quite a while to figure it out. This is what I do, and it may work for you.

Download your photos into a photo program (I use Picasa). Choose the photos you want to post and put them into the ‘tray’ to export onto your hard drive. Export with a name attached so you recognize it in the hard drive! Then, while writing up your story, you can have the hard drive photo window open and ready to tap onto the photo you want to ‘img’ by dragging (the individual file #highlighted) over to ‘choose file’ then press ‘insert this image’. Continue on with your story adding photos wherever you want!

I hope that helped. I don’t use Flicker or another other cyber method as it’s just too confusing for this computer-challenged gal!

-- Elaine in Duncan

View rejo55's profile

rejo55

175 posts in 908 days


#5 posted 04-15-2012 09:23 PM

Thanks a bunch, Elaine. I have tried the ones that LJ recommends and I thought I was fairly computer literate, even though I am 74 years old. You say that I can download Picasa and upload directly from my hard drive? Lordy, Girl, let me try that. I do so want to share the pics of what Miss Honey Ma’am has done inside.
Thanks, again. I’ll just delete the blog I posted and try again. Really sucks, though.

Have a good’un

Joe

-- rejo55, East Texas

View rejo55's profile

rejo55

175 posts in 908 days


#6 posted 04-15-2012 09:47 PM

Yeah, Howie, they’re landscape timbers. Sorry I haven’t gotten back to you before now, but I’ve been scrambling around, trying to post the interior. Seems that I can get the pics, but no narrative, or narrative w/o pics. My cool, even temperament is just about at the ragged edge. You see my avatar. I might just go postal in a minnit.
To answer your question, yes they’re landscape timbers. I did this in 1998, after my house had six feet of water in four years. The problem, now, is that they have changed the formulation of the treatment from CCA (Copper, Chromium and Arsenic) to some other junk that exudes a greenish crystal and is UGLY. These were kiln dried before treatment and as a result, they were very stable. Out of 1100 timbers, we did not have to cull one timber, and now that the house is almost twelve years old there are only two places that there has been enough shrinkage that you can see a faint strip of daylight between them. Of course, as we laid them up, we put a zig-zag line of caulk on top of each one, then, after the house was finished, we caulked each joint with a cedar colored caulk ( the nearest matching color), and Miss Honey Ma’am caulked all the exterior walls inside with silicone. We laid them as you would lay bricks—just be sure to break the joints, so that there is structural integrity in the walls. We fastened them with six-inch ring-shank pole barn nails—two nails side-by-side at each end of each timber, and a nail about every eight inches all the way down the timber. Talk about labor intensive! I started with a 4lb hammer (sucked) went to a 2lb (sucked) and wound up buying a 23oz California Framer (wooden handle). Worked like a charm. Some (a lot) of the kibitzers asked why I didn’t drill holes before nailing and I sed that I wanted the nails to hold. That’s the objective of a ring-shank nail.
We learned early on that you want to start at the corners first—lay three or four courses in the corner and then go down the wall. If you don’t the wall will run like a turkey. One of our walls leans a little, but there ain’t a thing I can do about it now.
If you’re thinking about doing one, be prepared to work your butt off, or hire someone to do it.

Any time I can be of service, let me know.

Have a good’un

Joe

-- rejo55, East Texas

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