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Blog entry by recycle1943 posted 05-18-2016 03:32 PM 652 reads 0 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Without getting into details I found today that you CAN drill a larger hole in a hole using a larger forstner bit.
I had previously drilled a 1/2” hole thinking it would allow plenty of clearance for sliding up and down freely on a 7/16” dowel rod. NOT !!

I should say that the piece to be sliding was about 7” long with a hole on each end to accept the dowel rod. Nothing precise just wanted it to be smoother.

Solution without starting over ? I put a champfer on the top and bottom of the existing hole which opened the drilling area up. I then selected the forstner bit, a 5/8” and centered it on the existing hole. I then brought the drill press fence up tight on the material while still hoilding the bit in place. Again with the bit in place I started the drill press and preceeded to finish the drill thru into a donor board.

Forgot to mention that the champfer was wider than the bit I wanted to use therefore already somewhat into the material.

It was a big guess that I wouldn’t get any tear out on the bottom with the champfer and I was right.

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - Your imagination is your only holdup



7 comments so far

View Oldtool's profile

Oldtool

2373 posts in 1650 days


#1 posted 05-18-2016 04:22 PM

I’m surprised the dowel didn’t slide in the half inch hole, should have been plenty of clearance. You sure the dowel isn’t a half inch?
When I encounter something like this, I just get a rat tail file and enlarge the hole, but whatever floats your boat is the way to go.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View recycle1943's profile

recycle1943

1147 posts in 1082 days


#2 posted 05-18-2016 04:47 PM

it did slide but uneven enough that it got hung up – the object was that I was able to re-drill using a larger forstner bit without destroying the initial piece of material

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - Your imagination is your only holdup

View USAwoodArt's profile

USAwoodArt

243 posts in 402 days


#3 posted 05-19-2016 12:40 AM

What about sanding the dowel rod?

-- Wood for projects is like a good Fart..."better when you cut it yourself"

View recycle1943's profile

recycle1943

1147 posts in 1082 days


#4 posted 05-19-2016 03:11 AM

Evidently re-drilling an already open hole with a Forstner bit is commonplace – I had never done it prior to today without screwing up a piece of wood. I know there are several different ways to open an existing hole but since I don’t have a twist bit larger than 1/2” I had to use a Forstner.

My entire point to this blog is about using a Forstner to enlarge an existing hole w/o screwing up a piece of wood

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - Your imagination is your only holdup

View splintergroup's profile

splintergroup

815 posts in 682 days


#5 posted 05-20-2016 02:23 PM

Another trick is to use your larger Forstner bit to drill a hole in a piece of scrap wood. Attach (clamp, double sided tape, etc.) with the hole aligned over your undersized hole. The larger hole in the scrap now can be used to guide your Forstner bit as you re-drill the smaller hole.

View recycle1943's profile

recycle1943

1147 posts in 1082 days


#6 posted 05-22-2016 10:09 AM



Another trick is to use your larger Forstner bit to drill a hole in a piece of scrap wood. Attach (clamp, double sided tape, etc.) with the hole aligned over your undersized hole. The larger hole in the scrap now can be used to guide your Forstner bit as you re-drill the smaller hole.

- splintergroup

I like that – probably won’t always want/need a champfer at the hole

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - Your imagination is your only holdup

View stefang's profile

stefang

15512 posts in 2794 days


#7 posted 05-25-2016 06:44 PM

I always do what recycle mentioned.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

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