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Blog entry by recycle1943 posted 01-15-2016 01:05 PM 916 reads 0 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch

For several years I’ve been replacing the light bulbs in my garage door opener on a too often basis. One would go out and then in a week or so the other bulb would not light when the door was opened or when you would break the sensor at the door.
Lazy is the first thing that comes to mind regarding these lights, not to mention the continual cost.
On an unusually warm day a couple weeks ago I decided to try my trouble shooting skills and took both sides off of the opener to see if a wire was loose, frayed or just for some reason being a problem child.
I should have prefaced the last sentence with the fact that I had previously on numerous occasions wiggled the light fixture and the light magically came on and worked for a week or so.
So after finding everything to be in like new condition and the bulb socket being nothing more than a plastic container slotted into the opener body I pulled the bulb out and peeked inside the cavity. There is nothing in there except the live feed in the center bottom and the neutral on the side. The bottom contact was darkened – looked like carbon so I scratched it shiny and did the same to the other side. Replaced the bulbs, put the sides back on and put the ladder away for what I hope will be another 17 years, if the opener lasts that much longer.
Bottom line ? I’ve been replacing bulbs for 3 or 4 years that had nothing wrong with them. I guess lazy is the proper answer – Oh well, I have some bowls to make and that door has no bearing on my wood working and we don’t go in and out that door too often at night.

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - Your imagination is your only holdup



7 comments so far

View Jeff2016's profile

Jeff2016

72 posts in 325 days


#1 posted 01-15-2016 01:17 PM

A friend of mine had a similar issue with his opener. He chose to dismantle the opener, remove the cheap socket and extend the wires. Then he purchased a small LED light bar which he mounted to the ceiling just behind the opener and wired it to the opener via his extensions.
Not only did he solve the issue, but the lighting difference is huge!

-- Proud owner of an electronics free workshop. Please check your cell phone at the door!

View recycle1943's profile

recycle1943

1152 posts in 1083 days


#2 posted 01-15-2016 01:51 PM

LED’s – That is the answer.
I’ve replaced all my bulbs in the shop and most all in the house with led’s.

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - Your imagination is your only holdup

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

7479 posts in 1467 days


#3 posted 01-15-2016 02:40 PM



A friend of mine had a similar issue with his opener. He chose to dismantle the opener, remove the cheap socket and extend the wires. Then he purchased a small LED light bar which he mounted to the ceiling just behind the opener and wired it to the opener via his extensions.
Not only did he solve the issue, but the lighting difference is huge!

- Jeff2016

I did pretty much the same thing at my shop back in Tennessee

-- Perform A Random Act Of Kindness Today ... Pay It Forward

View Roger's profile

Roger

19865 posts in 2264 days


#4 posted 01-15-2016 02:57 PM

Nice read Dick. I had a similar experience with an outside porch light near the entry door to my garage a few years back. I actually have 3 outside entry door lights that I used the exact, same, screw in sensors, that screw into the socket, then the bulb screws into it, so the light will come on automatically when it gets dark, and go off when the sun comes up the next morning. Anyhoo, to get to the point, the one that was giving me the problem of the lights going out after very short periods of time, turned out to be a loose ground wire in the box that was holding the light fixture on the outside wall. I think the crew that did our new siding a few years back when we had hail damage from a bad storm, was the cause, because, when the siding was replaced, someone didn’t get that ground screw tight enough. After I tightened it, my light has not been replaced since. Just goes to show, and it’s sad, but, you can’t always trust someone else’s work to be done properly. When “goofy” things like this happen, it’s a good thing to look into it, and I would say that most of the time it is because something is not tightened properly.

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Keep your dust collector fed. Kentuk55@yahoo.com

View recycle1943's profile

recycle1943

1152 posts in 1083 days


#5 posted 01-15-2016 03:09 PM

Roger – so many electrical issues are because the ground/neutral was not completed correctly. It’ll drive a sane person saner ?

-- Dick, Malvern Ohio - Your imagination is your only holdup

View htl's profile

htl

2179 posts in 620 days


#6 posted 01-15-2016 05:53 PM

One great tale to tell that can help us all down the road.
Two thumbs up!!!

-- There's a hundred ways to do anything, alot depends on the tools at hand.

View robscastle's profile

robscastle

3390 posts in 1665 days


#7 posted 01-15-2016 05:59 PM

Looks to be a global problem there… tee hee, I have the same issue with my unit and have also seen the less than effective level of manufacture of the fittings.

-- Regards Robert

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