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Homemade jointer guard.

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Project by conbillb posted 09-18-2008 07:54 AM 9280 views 2 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Hi. This is a improvised cutter guard for a old pre WW2 craftsman jointer that was made by King-Sealy. I picked it up at an auction for very little but it didn’t have the guard. Thought I should post this in case someone might need an idea for making one. It’s made out of aluminum 1 1/8” stair step angle that I formed to the radius of the cutter head, a couple of 5/16” self tapping screws, a couple of 3/8”nuts and washers for the all thread and some scrap for the rest. And a little bit of welding. Drilled one hole in the base of the jointer. I left extra length on the angle and support rod for counterbalance. Hope this might help someone.

-- Bill, S.E. Iowa





11 comments so far

View Pathpounder's profile

Pathpounder

98 posts in 4067 days


#1 posted 09-18-2008 12:26 PM

Looks like that ought to do it. I love the look of old iron. It has lines you don’t see on equipment today.

View brianinpa's profile

brianinpa

1812 posts in 3897 days


#2 posted 09-18-2008 02:58 PM

That should serve the purpose. Is it moveable like a porkchop guard? By the way: Nice score at the auction.

-- Brian, Lebanon PA, If you aren’t having fun doing it, find something else to do.

View Aubster's profile

Aubster

132 posts in 4202 days


#3 posted 09-18-2008 03:32 PM

Thanks for posting this. I have an old jointer without a guard. I know I should make one for it I just haven’t got around to it. I was going to ask the samething brianinpa asked, if it was moveable and if not how do you work around it? Thanks again.

-- A man who moves mountains starts one stone at a time.

View conbillb's profile

conbillb

39 posts in 3762 days


#4 posted 09-18-2008 05:03 PM

Hi. Yes it is very adjustable and when it is tightened snugly, about a 1/4 turn with a wrench after it is finger tight, it becomes nice and rigid. It adjusts vertically by loosening the two 3/8 nuts and moving the guard to the thickness of the wood you are face jointing, so the wood will clear underneath the guard, and then snug and tighten back up. It will adjust horizontally back and forth to allow wood to be edge jointed. Just loosen the set screw on top of the guard itself and slid it in to position and re-tighten finger tight. I crimped the pieces on a vise to fit with a rubber hammer. Let me see if I can post another view of it.http://i526.photobucket.com/albums/cc341/conbillb/PanasonicLumixFZ8camerapics019.jpg

-- Bill, S.E. Iowa

View conbillb's profile

conbillb

39 posts in 3762 days


#5 posted 09-18-2008 05:20 PM

http://i526.photobucket.com/albums/cc341/conbillb/PanasonicLumixFZ8camerapics018.jpg Here is another view to show the two basics for adjusting it. The two nuts on the left and set screw on the right. The set screw just pinches the aluminum against the bracket that is holding it. I painted it cherry red to remind me of the danger zone.

-- Bill, S.E. Iowa

View Mateo's profile

Mateo

28 posts in 3714 days


#6 posted 09-18-2008 10:20 PM

It’s a means to an end. My one suggestion would be a way for the clearance to be adjustable with out having to mess with the nuts. Points on ingenuity and the obvious durability.

-- Mateo

View conbillb's profile

conbillb

39 posts in 3762 days


#7 posted 09-19-2008 04:39 AM

Yeah, I was trying to think of something else besides the nuts but I wanted to get it done with what I had on hand. Definitely would upgrade it to make more user friendly.

-- Bill, S.E. Iowa

View CoreyLiepelt's profile

CoreyLiepelt

20 posts in 4014 days


#8 posted 09-19-2008 06:33 PM

conbillb, that looks quite like a Craftsman jointer I inherited from my father-in-law a few years ago (about a 5” capacity, right?). Unfortunately, I never got any instruction from him, and I can’t figure out how to adjust the outfeed table and keep it parallel with the infeed table. Do you have any insights that might help me? At the moment it’s mostly collecting dust, which seems such a shame when it could be helping me make dust!

-- Dublin, OH

View conbillb's profile

conbillb

39 posts in 3762 days


#9 posted 09-19-2008 08:45 PM

Hi Corey. I might be able to help a little. I’ve been trying to find it too. OWWM.com has the most info I can find.http://www.owwm.com/mfgindex/pubdetail.aspx?id=1312 This seems pretty close. Click on the PDF link and go to page 23. http://www.owwm.com/pubs/222/1626.pdf I think on page 10; The top Craftsman jointer is the actual machine (the other is a Companion). There is a couple of other manuals on this site that might apply. My actual model no. is 103.0502. Hope this helps you.

-- Bill, S.E. Iowa

View CoreyLiepelt's profile

CoreyLiepelt

20 posts in 4014 days


#10 posted 09-20-2008 03:53 AM

Thanks Bill. OWMM was a big help. I’ve discovered that my unit was actually designed as a right-hand jointer attachment to a 9” Craftsman table saw. The model number is 103.21840. It seems my father-in-law did some serious fiddling to make it function as a stand-alone unit. I was unable to find any manuals, but I did find an interesting photo of it attached as it was intended.

I swear, I’m always learning something when I come to LJ … :)

-- Dublin, OH

View conbillb's profile

conbillb

39 posts in 3762 days


#11 posted 09-20-2008 05:47 AM

Your welcome Corey. It was someone else from LJ that told me about OWMM. Lumberjocks is a great site with great people. King-Sealy must have been a quality company and I think it has evolved into RIGID tools. I emailed Rigid looking for a manual after reading this at OWMM.com and they sent me a note to contact Emerson Electric, who took over King-Sealy first. The number is 800-325-1184. By the way, that is half of a neat old machine you have. Mine is built like a tank, yours probably is too.

-- Bill, S.E. Iowa

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