LumberJocks

Rustic Coffee Table

  • Advertise with us
Project by Matt in Franklin posted 04-01-2014 12:08 PM 1192 views 4 times favorited 20 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I’ve been working on this project over the last six weeks or so as a request from the wife. We needed a coffee table for the living room. I built it out of 2×6 and 2×4 douglas fir lumber from the big box store (what a pain to find good boards!)

I used glue and pocket hole construction, using my new pocket hole jig setup HERE.

The finish is 2 coats of General Finishes Java gel stain and Arm-r Seal. For the Arm-r-Seal, I did five coats of gloss and 2 coats of satin. The top of the table has 2 more coats than the base. All applications were done with cotton rags.

The total cost of all materials was somewhere around $80, which will make it much easier to handle when the kids ding it up!

-- I'm just a simple caveman





20 comments so far

View steve_in_ohio's profile

steve_in_ohio

1068 posts in 262 days


#1 posted 04-01-2014 12:15 PM

looks very nice, great job

-- steve, simple and effective woodworking---

View Woodbridge's profile

Woodbridge

2709 posts in 1070 days


#2 posted 04-01-2014 12:55 PM

very nice looking table. I like the X braces you’ve added at each end. That is a nice design feature.

-- Peter, Woodbridge, Ontario

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

15772 posts in 1518 days


#3 posted 04-01-2014 01:01 PM

It’s a nice practical project. Congratulations.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View Matt in Franklin's profile

Matt in Franklin

237 posts in 264 days


#4 posted 04-01-2014 01:29 PM

Peter, that was the element of the table that made me sweat the most. I was not confident that the angles would come out properly and that the “X” would fit snugly into the side. But some careful planning and cutting allowed me to get it right (mostly)!

-- I'm just a simple caveman

View Matt in Franklin's profile

Matt in Franklin

237 posts in 264 days


#5 posted 04-01-2014 01:32 PM

Charles, it was a cheap way to fill a need as well as allow me to learn some new skills.

This was the first major project using pocket hole construction, my first time using GF gel stain, and my first time doing breadboard ends.

I was glad that I was operating on some cheap-o lumber and not on some nice hardwood.

And at the end of the day I get a table for the living room.

-- I'm just a simple caveman

View Chris 's profile

Chris

61 posts in 236 days


#6 posted 04-01-2014 07:11 PM

Being new to woodworking and trying to set up a shop myself this is a great inspiration! I definitely want to try something similar without being too concerned about investing in high quality wood and making a mistake or it getting damaged. Thanks for sharing. I love the design and the finish.

View Matt in Franklin's profile

Matt in Franklin

237 posts in 264 days


#7 posted 04-01-2014 07:23 PM

Being able to learn new skills on cheap lumber is the biggest draw.

However, there are certain skills you have to learn to compensate for poor quality wood as well.

-- I'm just a simple caveman

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6818 posts in 1803 days


#8 posted 04-01-2014 08:39 PM

Nice, 2×6 furniture can look good when done right and it certainly seems like you have. True, good boards can be hard to find.

I used dye on some pine bunk beds I made recently and it worked well but I really like the look of that Gel stain. I have to give it a try.

Nice work man!

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View Matt in Franklin's profile

Matt in Franklin

237 posts in 264 days


#9 posted 04-01-2014 08:45 PM

the gel stain is awesome and easy to apply. It looks great, especially after applying a coat of Charles Neil’s blotch control.

-- I'm just a simple caveman

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6818 posts in 1803 days


#10 posted 04-01-2014 08:51 PM

Yeah but blotch is in style man! Check out etsy some time, it will make you sick what some people are making money off of these days.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View Matt in Franklin's profile

Matt in Franklin

237 posts in 264 days


#11 posted 04-01-2014 08:54 PM

You are right Mauricio! However, I dont do blotch, even on “rustic” pieces.

The only time I might make an exception would be if I made a “distressed” piece.

-- I'm just a simple caveman

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6818 posts in 1803 days


#12 posted 04-01-2014 09:11 PM

I agree, to much blotching, especially on pine looks like crap, the transtint dye colors all parts of the wood as well but you have to go over it a couple of times. At some point though I’m wondering if I shouldn’t just paint that damn thing.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View Matt in Franklin's profile

Matt in Franklin

237 posts in 264 days


#13 posted 04-01-2014 09:17 PM

I have seen demonstrations using the blotch control before using dye. It evens out the color, but it’s lighter (because the dye doesnt penetrate as well), so you have to apply a second coat to get more color. but the extra work is well worth it.

you could probably get away with heavy coats of gel stain and not use blotch control. But with dye staining/regular oil based stain, I’d be using the blotch control.

Bunk beds, I’d be painting white (or pink in my house). You dont use them that many years and they will get beat up anyhow.

-- I'm just a simple caveman

View Mean_Dean's profile

Mean_Dean

1445 posts in 1799 days


#14 posted 04-02-2014 12:38 AM

That’s a great looking table! And you certainly can’t beat the price!

But don’t be afraid of the hardwoods. After a little practice on the inexpensive stuff, just dive right in. You might be a little nervous at first, but after awhile, it’s just another piece of wood.

-- Dean

View Matt in Franklin's profile

Matt in Franklin

237 posts in 264 days


#15 posted 04-02-2014 12:48 AM

Thanks Dean. You’re right. Its just getting over the hump. That, and finding a redneck friend that can supply you with cheap hardwood :-)

-- I'm just a simple caveman

showing 1 through 15 of 20 comments

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase