LumberJocks

Cherry Humidor with Walnut splines

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Project by Dinger posted 03-23-2014 05:17 PM 1283 views 1 time favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I made this cherry humidor for my cousin. I must admit, when I saw that grain, I wanted to tell him that it ruined the lumber or something to keep it for myself! Anyway, this was my first box. Construction is splined miters with the to glued on. Thanks a lot to Boxguy for all his projects and insights on his blog regarding this construction method! Including a jig for sawing the splines! Cutting the top off turned out to be a disaster. I think my sled had enough play in it to really throw things off. I ended up a full 1/8” off with the last cut. I’ll probably use a hand saw and connect the lines next time. The bottom is a 1/4” plywood.

As for the “humidor” portion of the project, I pretty much winged it. I did get some input from the local Woodcraft guys, which helped a lot, but nothing official. Maybe there isn’t more to it than plunking some Spanish cedar in there. I had to glue up a couple panels for the top and bottom and left some room at the edges for wood movement. Their only spot glued with hide glue to keep them in place. The seams on the bottom are covered by the sides, but the top isn’t. I rounded off the top edges to allow for the lid to close. I was able to sneak up on the cut for the sides to get a nice tight fit. I put in a simple finger lift with a cove bit. Apparently cherry burns quite easily or my bits suck. I convinced myself I liked the look. :) I may add a tray with some scraps but needed some feedback on which direction he wanted the tray. Finish is two coats of tongue oil. I’ll have to learn how to apply wax one of these days…

Thanks for looking!

-- "Begin every endeaver with the end ever in mind."





5 comments so far

View bit101's profile

bit101

106 posts in 1345 days


#1 posted 03-23-2014 06:05 PM

That’s fantastic for a first box. Very well done.

View SoonerFanJerry's profile

SoonerFanJerry

81 posts in 995 days


#2 posted 03-23-2014 08:03 PM

Very nice!

View Boxguy's profile

Boxguy

2180 posts in 1735 days


#3 posted 03-23-2014 08:58 PM

Dinger, thanks for the mention in your posting. Great first box. I especially like how you used the grain pattern and combined the colors. There is a tutorial on cutting off the tops of boxes. You just use the fence on your table saw as a guide. No jig needed. There is also a tutorial on finishing.

If you cut the lengths of your four sides first then undercut those with a 45 you will get a perfect match at the corners.

Cherry does tend to burn, especially if you use a dull router bit or move it a bit too slowly across the grain, but sanding will get rid of that. The burns at the corners of your finger lift can be eliminated by wrapping some paper from a sticky backed roll (available at Home Depot) of sand paper around a dowel that matches the diameter of the cut. It only takes a few strokes if you match the size well.

Your first box is certainly better than any of my first 25 boxes. I like the proportions you used. If the top is cut off a bit thicker at the sides it will mean less chance of warping. What a great start. Keep boxing and keep posting.

-- Big Al in IN

View Dinger's profile

Dinger

145 posts in 1730 days


#4 posted 03-25-2014 02:08 PM

Thanks guys.

Boxguy: I think the mistake I made was that I flattened the top by hand and therefore wasn’t prefectly flat, in retrospect. I did review your methods to stop short of cutting all the way through when cutting the top to not pinch the blade. I should have registered the fence on the bottom, not the top. I ended up running both pieces through the table saw again and then hand planing the edges. The fit wasn’t perfect and that’s why I rounded the edges. I wanted to try your finger lift method. I will next time to avoid the burning.

-- "Begin every endeaver with the end ever in mind."

View Boxguy's profile

Boxguy

2180 posts in 1735 days


#5 posted 03-25-2014 09:53 PM

Dinger, thanks for the excellent feedback. I always put the bottom against the fence when I cut my lids, but I don’t think I mentioned that in the tutorial. I should fix that. Sanding will fix the burn.

Dinger, you are way ahead of where I started, and you made a great box. We all learn from our mistakes…and I seem to come up with new ways to make mistakes on every box I make. The good news is that I am getting better at fixing my errors.

I am eagerly looking forward to your next posting. It is sure to be another gem. Keep boxing and keep posting.

-- Big Al in IN

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