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cedar fence

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Project by 502flier posted 03-19-2014 06:11 AM 1022 views 0 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch
cedar fence
cedar fence No picture No picture No picture No picture No picture
Zoom Pictures

Had to build some cedar fence to keep the dogs in. As usual, I had lots of bamboo on hand, so used that for the spindles and inside the Orca on the man-gate (my wife’s an Orca freak, so that was a surprise for her).

-- Kevin - Keep the shiny side up





10 comments so far

View Ken90712's profile

Ken90712

16957 posts in 2655 days


#1 posted 03-19-2014 07:57 AM

Great job and nice touches on this…. Very clean.

-- Ken, "Everyday above ground is a good day!"

View mcoyfrog's profile

mcoyfrog

3800 posts in 3061 days


#2 posted 03-19-2014 07:06 PM

What there is a fence there all i see is a bike. LOL just kidding very nice job from one biker to another

-- Wood and Glass they kick (well you know) Have a great day - Dug

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

1471 posts in 2104 days


#3 posted 03-19-2014 07:55 PM

Is this western cedar or or eastern red (aromatic) cedar? Is there any finish or wood preservative used?

I was thinking about using eastern red cedar for a fence, but concerned that the termites would eat the sapwood. The heartwood I’m confident would be OK. I can get cedar fairly cheaply from http://www.grantcedarmill.com up in Tennessee, but it has a lot of white sap-wood on it, as far as I can see from the photos.

-Ocelot

View 502flier's profile

502flier

41 posts in 1743 days


#4 posted 03-19-2014 10:03 PM

@Dug – I guess that’s why there’s a zoom function!! lol The picture was actually a bike pic, but I didn’t have any other photos of the fence. Do you recognize the make?

@Ocelot – This is western red cedar, milled locally (I’m on Vancouver Island). It’s unfinished as yet because it’s the rainy season – once the wood dries up, I’ll finish it, but really torn as to what to use. We don’t have termite issues here, so cedar, even untreated, lasts a very long time. But I’m really partial to keeping the colour as opposed to letting it weather to grey.

-- Kevin - Keep the shiny side up

View mcoyfrog's profile

mcoyfrog

3800 posts in 3061 days


#5 posted 03-20-2014 02:51 AM

LOL i’m not the best with identifying but looks like it could be a Indian at least by the front fender am I close

-- Wood and Glass they kick (well you know) Have a great day - Dug

View 502flier's profile

502flier

41 posts in 1743 days


#6 posted 03-20-2014 06:29 AM

Yeah, you got it. I have two, but this is the new 2014 Vintage model.

-- Kevin - Keep the shiny side up

View svenbecca's profile

svenbecca

141 posts in 1933 days


#7 posted 03-20-2014 02:50 PM

What cedar fence. I can’t see past the bike.

Looks great, the fence, too.

-- A carpenter takes an ugly, knotted, twisted piece of wood and makes something beautiful and pure from it. Jesus is a carpenter, I am a piece of wood.

View Ocelot's profile

Ocelot

1471 posts in 2104 days


#8 posted 03-20-2014 03:55 PM

Thanks for the reply. I figured it was western cedar. It must be nice to have no termites!

View LesB's profile

LesB

1237 posts in 2909 days


#9 posted 03-20-2014 06:05 PM

There are three main types of Cedar in the northwestern US. Incense Cedar often known locally as “pencil wood” because it is frequently used for that purpose. Western Red Cedar which is used primarily in deck construction. Those two are often interchanged for uses like fences and decks and hard to tell apart in the lumber form. Incense is a bit softer. Third is Port Orford Cedar also used in construction. All are quite insect and rot resistant.
Termites in the northwest need contact with moisture (soil) to survive so if you keep the wood away from moist soil they will not damage it. Carpenter ants have a similar life style to termites but seem to especially like cedar. They don’t eat it but dig channels and holes for their nests.
Regardless of the coating you use they will eventually weather and turn grey shades when exposed to the elements. Cleaning, bleaching, and resealing every 2 to 3 years will bring back most of the color but that is a lot of work. I suggest you just let nature take it’s course or use a stain based sealer to renew the color you want and reapply every 3-4 years on fences and every 2 years on decks. I particularly like Behr brand for this purpose.
When building fences and decks it is a good idea to let wet wood dry out first. Otherwise you can end up with good sized gaps between the boards when it does dry. I would only use kiln dried wood for a deck for that reason. Also if the wood was planed you should let it weather for a year or sand it before you put a sealer/stain on. The paning process forms a compress surface that does not accept the sealer/stain well and it will not last through the first winter.
Put in more pictures of the bike. LOL

-- Les B, Oregon

View mcoyfrog's profile

mcoyfrog

3800 posts in 3061 days


#10 posted 03-20-2014 06:32 PM

Cool got it right, I have a 2004 HD night train in the shop as I type being painted, a friend is doing it in his spare time should be done in a couple weeks, I can’t wait

-- Wood and Glass they kick (well you know) Have a great day - Dug

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