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PEN-ding approval

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Project by DIYaholic posted 01-27-2014 04:00 AM 657 views 0 times favorited 27 comments Add to Favorites Watch

A couple of more pens, to accompany the ones I did yesterday.

1st Pic:
The Dynamic Duo

2nd & 3rd Pic:
Reclaimed Oak flooring, Paste Wax finish, Copper Funline Kit

4th & 5th Pic:
Reclaimed Hard Maple flooring, Black India Ink sanded to 2000 grit, Paste Wax finish, Satin Chrome Funline Kit

6th Pic:
Mixed Doubles

Yup, I still need to work on my finishing regimen….
That and my turning skills!!! ;^)

All in all, I’m happy with my first attempt at turning

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procratination a bad thing?





27 comments so far

View Mainiac Matt 's profile

Mainiac Matt

3906 posts in 966 days


#1 posted 01-27-2014 04:07 AM

Nice job Randy…. Don’t forget to puts da ink in your ink pin 8^)

-- Pine is fine, but Oak's no joke!

#2 posted 01-27-2014 04:13 AM

Randy will join lathe-a-holics in 3,2,1…...

Those look good.

-- Practice does not make perfect. Only perfect practice makes perfect. Vince Lombardi

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DIYaholic

13378 posts in 1312 days


#3 posted 01-27-2014 04:14 AM

Thanks Matt.
Whadda ya mean….
I thought these were invisible ink pens!!!

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procratination a bad thing?

View DIYaholic's profile (online now)

DIYaholic

13378 posts in 1312 days


#4 posted 01-27-2014 04:16 AM

Lucas,
I don’t have a problem.
I can quit any time I want…
Besides not wanting to quit, I’m just not a quitter!!!

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procratination a bad thing?

View JL7's profile

JL7

7140 posts in 1603 days


#5 posted 01-27-2014 04:23 AM

They’re flying off the lathe now! How does the India ink thing work? Applied after turning and then sanded?

Nice work buddy….....

Next up…...wood shopping…..

-- Jeff - I have not failed. I've just found 10,002 ways that won't work.

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DIYaholic

13378 posts in 1312 days


#6 posted 01-27-2014 05:08 AM

Jeff,
I was hoping for a deep black….
As you can see that didn’t happen.

The first oak pen was turned, sanded to 600 grit, then a liberal coating of India ink. The ink was allowed to sit/dry for a few(5) minutes, then wiped off. It was streaky, so I sanded it back down to what it is now, then applied wax. I tried again with the maple, but I sanded to 2000 grit. However, this time I let it sit/dry longer (maybe 15 minutes), reapplied another coat of ink and let that sit/dry, but with the same results. I think the sanding burnished the wood and doesn’t allow the ink to be absorbed. On my next attempt, I will apply the ink after the initial (80-100? grit) sanding.

It is all trial & error, hoping that someday….
Trial & Success will prevail!!!

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procratination a bad thing?

View JL7's profile

JL7

7140 posts in 1603 days


#7 posted 01-27-2014 05:20 AM

You’re right, it’s all trial and error, but they turned out well, so that is success…..perhaps not exactly what you envisioned but I find that few things really turn out exactly how you plan…...doesn’t make it a bad thing…..

Keep experimenting, never know what you’ll get next….

-- Jeff - I have not failed. I've just found 10,002 ways that won't work.

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DIYaholic

13378 posts in 1312 days


#8 posted 01-27-2014 05:27 AM

Yup, I didn’t get what I expected….
But, I now know how to get the results that I got!!!

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procratination a bad thing?

View patron's profile

patron

13025 posts in 1979 days


#9 posted 01-27-2014 08:54 AM

-- david - only thru kindness can this world be whole . If we don't succeed we run the risk of failure. Dan Quayle

View Sandra's profile

Sandra

4309 posts in 713 days


#10 posted 01-27-2014 10:51 AM

What Patron said.

Nicely done.

-- No, I don't want to buy the pink hammer.

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DIYaholic

13378 posts in 1312 days


#11 posted 01-27-2014 11:34 AM

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procratination a bad thing?

View DIYaholic's profile (online now)

DIYaholic

13378 posts in 1312 days


#12 posted 01-27-2014 11:35 AM

74,
Please look at the above hat….
Change “DAD” to 74!!!

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procratination a bad thing?

View William's profile

William

8979 posts in 1480 days


#13 posted 01-27-2014 12:58 PM

Ok, I’ll give my honest opinion. I think you deserve that much from me.

Turning.
I’m glad to see the fat pen in the last photo. It’s not because of the size, but because of the better flow between the wood and the hardware. I may be wrong, photos are hard to tell sometimes, but a couple of the others look like the wood at the clip end and middle ring is larger than the hardware just a tiny bit. Little detail like that is what makes a good pen a great one. No worries, I still fight with that sometimes myself.
On skinny straight barrels, the wood should be turned thinner to match the hardware, or tapered at the ends slightly to match the hardware. Here is the key though. How much do you sand off? I turn mine just a tiny tiny bit oversized. Then I sand down to final size. The reason for this is, once it is turned, I remove more material, and if I turned it exactly the bushing size, it will then be smaller than the hardware.
Past that, the turning aspect looks like you’re doing great. I haven’t heard about scary catches or blowouts, so I think your initial turnings are better than the ones I done.

Sanding
Your sanding looks great to me. I’ve tried teaching a few people how I sand my pens with them standing in my shop, and they still don’t get it right away. I’m not laughing at them, because it took me a while to get a routine that worked. That is the key right there too. You have to find a routine that works for you and produced reliable result each and every time. The way I learned that was to waste some wood. I chucked scrap between centers, turned it to the size and shape of pens, and sanded. When that did’nt turn out right, I don it again, and again. And you get the picture. The thing is though this. Even the early ones were satisfactory. That’s what others told me anyway. I won’t tell you that. Get a sanding regimine that you are satisfied with.

Finish.
I think I’ve told you that finish is a matter of choice. There are thousands of articles online if you want to read up on them. I personally don’t see anything wrong with your finish. For old looking wood like you done here, the satin finish (which is what it looks like to me) looks more correct than a super glossy one would.
Here is something else to think about though. Are you still using paste wax? If so, put one of your pens in the hands of someone you know that writes a lot. In a couple of weeks, after oils from their hands gets imbedded into the pen, driving the wax deeper into the pores of the wood, the finish will look even better.

All in all, I think you’re doing great though. I hope this response doesn’t make me sound like an ass. I think you would rather me give you pointers though than to be nice to you.
Now that you’re hooked. I’d like to revisit this post in a few months and see how much time and money you’ve put Into it. I guess though the better question will be how much you’ll be willing to admit to.

-- http://wddsrfinewoodworks.blogspot.com/

View Dave's profile

Dave

11160 posts in 1477 days


#14 posted 01-27-2014 01:29 PM

Looking professional there dude.
You will be gifting them and selling them next.
Take a look at Carl Jacobson’s wet sanding method on YouTube. No dust.

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View DIYaholic's profile (online now)

DIYaholic

13378 posts in 1312 days


#15 posted 01-27-2014 01:39 PM

William,
Critiquing from you is what I want and more importantly NEED!!! I did not and won’t ever take your criticisms as a personal attack, it is you sharing your knowledge and looking at the fine details. With that said….

Yes, my transitions from turnings to hardware needs improvement!
Figuring out the correct amount of material to leave for sanding will come, I hope, with experience. I have only had a few small catches with my straight skew, which I am thankful for. I proceed very carefully with my skew, as I do respect it! No blowouts to speak of yet!!

So far, I’m happy with my sanding. I also agree that a consistent routine, that produces repeatable results is the goal. Perfect practice, yields perfect results!!! A question for you… How long do you spend on each grit? on the entire sanding routine??

All of these pens are finished with paste wax. I need to practice with the CA! I feel that you are correct, different styles of pens, hardware and wood treatments deserve a variety of textures(?). Satin, semi-gloss & high-gloss can/will all come into play.

Thanks for the encouragement, critique and most importantly, your honesty!!!
Now stop lookin’ at my work….
& go to you shop and start “Makin’ Shavin’s”!!!

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procratination a bad thing?

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