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Walnut Tabletop

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Project by WispWoods posted 01-05-2014 03:55 AM 2059 views 5 times favorited 26 comments Add to Favorites Watch

We tore down a wall and installed a bookshelf base for this walnut tabletop.

I overbuilt the base because I wanted to adequately support this massive top.
Dimensions are 46” wide, 56” long and over 1.5” thick

The walnut was air dried for two years. It worked very well with hand tools. After flattening with planes, it took little sanding to get it ready for finish.

I glued up the slab with West Systems epoxy.

-- - You begin thinking less, and feeling more.





26 comments so far

View Ted78's profile

Ted78

158 posts in 690 days


#1 posted 01-05-2014 04:00 AM

Beautiful! What did you use for a finish?

-- Ted

View Kristoffer's profile

Kristoffer

670 posts in 1906 days


#2 posted 01-05-2014 04:38 AM

That is gorgeous!

-- Cheers and God Bless

View jaysonic's profile

jaysonic

219 posts in 832 days


#3 posted 01-05-2014 05:58 AM

I very much like that walnut top!

View exelectrician's profile

exelectrician

1665 posts in 1117 days


#4 posted 01-05-2014 09:20 AM

All that sumptuous wood grain, I have green eyes. Lucky you to have all that wonderful material.

-- Love thy neighbour as thyself

View exelectrician's profile

exelectrician

1665 posts in 1117 days


#5 posted 01-05-2014 09:22 AM

All that sumptuous wood grain, I have green eyes. Lucky you to have all that wonderful material.
I showed my wife – she loves it too!

-- Love thy neighbour as thyself

View majuvla's profile

majuvla

3537 posts in 1557 days


#6 posted 01-05-2014 01:10 PM

Beautiful outstanding top.Nice wood.

-- Ivan, Croatia, Wooddicted

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

14600 posts in 1028 days


#7 posted 01-05-2014 02:06 PM

Very awesome work. I like to see the sapwood. Sometimes people forget that mother nature made it to match.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View whitebeast88's profile

whitebeast88

3550 posts in 880 days


#8 posted 01-05-2014 02:16 PM

beautiful top.excellent build.thanks for sharing.

-- Marty.Athens,AL

View WispWoods's profile

WispWoods

65 posts in 2116 days


#9 posted 01-05-2014 02:38 PM

Thanks, everyone!

Ted, I’ll try m best to remember the finishing schedule. I started with a penetrating oil finish, pretty sure it was Boiled Linseed Oil. After I satiated the walnut’s thirst, I moved toward film finished, starting with a oil /poly / thinner mix. 4-5 coats of wipe on / wipe off wasn’t building the protection that I knew this surface would require. So I smoothed it out again with 320 grit paper and shot a coat of poly with my Apollo turbine. That provided a nice level of protection but because I don’t have a spray booth, I ended up with a gritty finish. I knocked down the dust nips with 320 then 400 wet/dry. Then I quickly wiped on a couple “flash coats” of poly, which is in the 70% thinner / 30% poly range.

Long process but the end result shines like a new penny. The original coats of oil popped the curl and the poly will make sure it is beautiful for years to come!

-- - You begin thinking less, and feeling more.

View wunderaa's profile

wunderaa

193 posts in 892 days


#10 posted 01-05-2014 02:54 PM

Beautiful grain pattern. Nice work!

View DanaLynn's profile

DanaLynn

40 posts in 824 days


#11 posted 01-05-2014 03:25 PM

I love your walnut tabletop. I was wondering…how is it that walnut sometimes get that white streak through it. I was fortunate once to have a piece like that.

-- Dana, Indiana, http://www.facebook.com/DynamicWoodArt

View DanaLynn's profile

DanaLynn

40 posts in 824 days


#12 posted 01-05-2014 03:29 PM

Is that the sapwood? And if so, what does that mean?

-- Dana, Indiana, http://www.facebook.com/DynamicWoodArt

View WispWoods's profile

WispWoods

65 posts in 2116 days


#13 posted 01-05-2014 04:56 PM

You are right, DanaLynn. That is the sapwood.

From what I’ve heard, it isn’t as prominent on some pieces, especially those that have been fumed and kiln dried.
I think Wood Talk has discussed this in the past. Shannon might be able to offer his lumberyard process knowledge if you want more information. http://lumberjocks.com/ShannonRogers

These boards are a lovely example of the benefits of air dried stock. Easy to work with edge tools. Unadulterated beauty of nature!

It is important to note that the sapwood doesn’t run “though” the piece but rather along the edge. It is shown in 4 bands on this tabletop. I arranged the boards in a sap/heart/sap repeating pattern.

Think of this tabletop as three “sections” that each represent one tangential log cross section (imagine laying the log on the ground and slicing parallel to the ground, also known as “flitch” or “through and through” cutting). Each section will progress from bark, to sapwood, to heartwood, back to sapwood, and finally out the other side of bark. When you set the sliced sections next to each other, the sapwood from one section will merge with the sapwood on the next.

Again, it is kinda hard to explain and really easy to do. Just compose the board until they flow.

-- - You begin thinking less, and feeling more.

View Bluepine38's profile

Bluepine38

2911 posts in 1775 days


#14 posted 01-05-2014 06:09 PM

Wonderful tabletop that shows off the beauty of the complete tree width. You did a great job composing
the boards. Thank you for sharing.

-- As ever, Gus-the 75 yr young apprentice carpenter

View KMT's profile

KMT

591 posts in 1352 days


#15 posted 01-05-2014 06:09 PM

Beautiful work and very good explanations! Thanks for sharing the project and knowledge with us.

-- - Martin

showing 1 through 15 of 26 comments

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