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Cheap and Easy Lap Joint Jig

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Project by BassBully posted 04-02-2007 03:41 AM 8258 views 6 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I made this lap joint jig for a future project that I’m going to make for my wife. The jig was made using scraps out of my shop so I didn’t have to purchase anything new. The jig itself is made out of 3/4” plywood, screws, plexi-glass, and glue.

When cutting the lap joint, the jig slides along the table saw fence while the jig itself keeps the wood square with the assistance of the spring clamps. The plex-glass at the end acts as a stop and helps keep the wood square when clamping the wood to the jig.

-- There are three types of people in the world, those who can count and those who can't!





9 comments so far

View WayneC's profile

WayneC

12302 posts in 2845 days


#1 posted 04-02-2007 03:43 AM

Cool. Looks like it could be used for tenons too.

-- We must guard our enthusiasm as we would our life - James Krenov

View BassBully's profile

BassBully

259 posts in 2845 days


#2 posted 04-02-2007 03:46 AM

You’re right Wayne. I could also use it for tenons. I didn’t even think about that when I created it.

-- There are three types of people in the world, those who can count and those who can't!

View markrules's profile

markrules

146 posts in 2863 days


#3 posted 04-02-2007 04:23 AM

Looks like my tenoning jig!

I used it tonight.

http://lumberjocks.com/projects/813

View Lou's profile

Lou

178 posts in 2830 days


#4 posted 04-02-2007 04:48 AM

looks alot like my tennoning jig!

-- "What one can make with good tools is limited only by one's talent" (lucius-hill@comcast.net)

View Sawdust2's profile

Sawdust2

1467 posts in 2835 days


#5 posted 04-02-2007 12:08 PM

I’m a little confused. From the look of the blade you are pushing the board to be cut into the blade. That makes sense but it leaves no support on the back and, IMHO, those little clamps might not be enough to securely hold the wood. I can imagine the blade kicking the board back and ruining the wood.
If you put the plexiglass on the other end of your jig then you would have a little more support.
Just a suggestion. It’s always good to make jigs that make tasks a little easier.

-- No piece is cut too short. It was meant for a smaller project.

View BassBully's profile

BassBully

259 posts in 2845 days


#6 posted 04-03-2007 12:02 AM

Trust me, those little clamps hold very well. I could put the plexi-glass in the back but I didn’t want to give too much confidence to the screws holding the plexi being that they are fastened into the “end-grain” of the plywood. Either way I would have them clamped down so “six of one and half a dozen of the other” I guess. My design is a modification of a plan I found in one of my Fine Woodworking books and they have their wood in the front as well. If I run into problems I’ll move it.

-- There are three types of people in the world, those who can count and those who can't!

View fred's profile

fred

256 posts in 2846 days


#7 posted 04-03-2007 06:49 PM

Do you make one pass with the jig and then trim to the right size or just nibble away at it?

-- Fred Childs, Pasadena, CA - - - Law of the Workshop: Any tool, when dropped, will roll to the least accessible corner.

View Jiri Parkman's profile

Jiri Parkman

950 posts in 2560 days


#8 posted 01-10-2008 02:49 PM

Good job.

-- Jiri

View Grumpy's profile

Grumpy

19702 posts in 2599 days


#9 posted 01-01-2010 05:10 AM

Good Idea.

-- Grumpy - "Always look on the bright side of life"- Monty Python

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