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Guitar Generation #3.

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Project by Chardt posted 08-08-2013 03:54 PM 1175 views 2 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Guitar Generation #3.
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Hi All,

It’s been a while since I posted here…work, play, and being a Dad have kept me busy.

I realized I haven’t posted a bunch of guitars I’ve finished in quite a while, so I thought I would post them now with a quick description of each..

this is a PINE Telecaster made from an old beam I have had for years…it’s probably 30+ years old, it had been out in the weather for the last few years before I cut it up, and stored it to dry….I used a plain yellow stain (rit dye) and a couple of coats…then I added 2 coats of linseed oil, and shellac. I also did a cream binding. I wired a single humbucker with a push/pull pot on the tone to split to the traditional Tele single coil. This guitar sounds amazingly bright at punchy. It is the best sounding tele I have ever heard/played. In place of the traditional chrome plate I cut an old piece of copper pipe and hammered it out…which adds to the look…and instead of a plastic pickguard I used an old album (*Billy Joel ‘The Stranger’). I was going to use it as a test and go with either Elvis Costello ‘My Aim is True’ or QUEEN ‘A Day at the Races’...but since it turned out great, I kept it.

The next guitar is a Les Paul neck thru with a Curly Redwood top.

I used Alder for the body, and a lot of chisels and rasps to get the arch on top…. For a stain, I started with black and sanded it back then 3 coats of orange and 2 coats of linseed oil before adding shellac. The pickups are handwound humbuckers with coil taps on the tone knobs, and a wraparound bridge to show off more of the redwood. I used a vintage neckthru blank, and have been replacing the boring neck dot’s with raw abalone shell as I get time. This guitar sounds even BETTER than my gibson Les Paul, and it plays amazingly well.

Next we come to a ZebraWood les paul..
This is a much thinner lighter version of the les paul, with a wide neck…I used sparse inlay (only an abalone block at the 12th fret) to keep the focus on the grain of the body. I hand sculpted areas on the top bout where the arm rests, and the control cavity…again using hand wound pickups. This guitar plays great and is very eye catching as well.

And THIS is the Turtle Bass I made as a thank you for Damn Hippie,

Its an alder body Fretless bass with an ebony fingerboard and a Tribal turtle inlay in the body made of Walnut, Mother of Pearl and Copper wire.

There are several more guitars in various stages of finish that I’ll get around to posting once I get them done.

thanks for reading.
~CH

-- When my wife ask's what I have to show for my wood working hobby, I just show her the splinters.





8 comments so far

View Chardt's profile

Chardt

169 posts in 3069 days


#1 posted 08-08-2013 04:21 PM

you can find more up to date progress of what I’m working on here:

https://www.facebook.com/pages/CH-Custom-Guitar-Shop/212219678809570?ref=hl

-- When my wife ask's what I have to show for my wood working hobby, I just show her the splinters.

View Surfside's profile

Surfside

3389 posts in 1641 days


#2 posted 08-08-2013 07:55 PM

I’m impressed! You are exceptionally talented! It takes a lot of talent and patience to work on those guitars!

-- "someone has to be wounded for others to be saved, someone has to sacrifice for others to feel happiness, someone has to die so others could live"

View Chardt's profile

Chardt

169 posts in 3069 days


#3 posted 08-08-2013 07:59 PM

Thanks for that, although I consider it more an acquired skill through a LOT of trial and error…but as for patience, I, like I’m sure most of us here find the process of working in the woodshop therapeutic and relaxing. I usually have music playing, and the hours fly by…and hopefully at the end of the day (haha, ok month) I have something that I’m proud of. :-)

I’m really grateful to all of the amazing craftsman both here and on the guitar builders forum that I’ve been able to learn from.

-- When my wife ask's what I have to show for my wood working hobby, I just show her the splinters.

View Melman's profile

Melman

34 posts in 1277 days


#4 posted 08-08-2013 08:12 PM

Chardt, these are great!!! Did you use a kit for the necks or did you make them yourself?

Did you have enough weight in the body of the bass to balance out the weight of the neck?

I think the zebra wood LP came out the best!!!

Melman

-- "All good stories cost you blood or money" - Pat Finney

View Chardt's profile

Chardt

169 posts in 3069 days


#5 posted 08-08-2013 08:16 PM

I made the neck on the Zebra wood, and the Bass….the Tele has a Custom shop Fender neck that a buddy traded me for me to make HIM a custom body…I did dbl tort. shell binding on his and an antique white paint.

the Redwood lp used an old-stock Gretsch neck-thru blank that I got…

and the bass neck tapers down to the headstock helping the balance. the entire bass is actually really light.

-- When my wife ask's what I have to show for my wood working hobby, I just show her the splinters.

View Ken90712's profile

Ken90712

16957 posts in 2656 days


#6 posted 08-09-2013 08:36 AM

Great work, Some real beautys!

-- Ken, "Everyday above ground is a good day!"

View Fishinbo's profile

Fishinbo

11362 posts in 1643 days


#7 posted 08-12-2013 04:37 PM

Wow! Those guitars look amazing. Great wood colors and awesome finish. Excellent work!

View Chardt's profile

Chardt

169 posts in 3069 days


#8 posted 08-12-2013 04:49 PM

Thanks! Much appreciated. It’s been a lot of fun.

-- When my wife ask's what I have to show for my wood working hobby, I just show her the splinters.

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