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Bowl Obsession - In need of Honest Opinion

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Project by Nick_R posted 402 days ago 900 views 0 times favorited 22 comments Add to Favorites Watch

These are two bowls/plates I made while practicing and trying to master the bowl gouges. One is maple and the other is cherry. As you look at the bottom of the bowls you can see the tenon’s I made to place the bowl on my chuck.

The question is…........ Do you think it is ok to leave them or should I take the extra step and remove them?

I left them because I thought they were kind of neat… but is it on the amateur side? I hope to improve and want the pieces to be ummmmmmmmm right….

Thanks in advance for anyone that takes the time to comment.

-- Hope for the best but plan for the worst. - 7 finger Nick :)





22 comments so far

View Oldtool's profile

Oldtool

1726 posts in 777 days


#1 posted 402 days ago

I am not an avid turner, but I say leave them, the tenons. Looks like thy make a nice stable base to set them on.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View BernieMay's profile

BernieMay

23 posts in 1624 days


#2 posted 402 days ago

the shorter tenon bowl looks great. I think the thicker/deeper tenon is too much and should be reduced.

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6910 posts in 1501 days


#3 posted 402 days ago

I am with Bernie on this one. Other than that, the turning looks very good.

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

10972 posts in 1692 days


#4 posted 402 days ago

I think the shorter tenon looks better too! You can make a bowl with a short foot on it and still have a female tenon inside and no one would be the wiser that is was not just part of the design. when I started turning a bowl I got to a point of how do I get rid of that tenon and finish the bottom. I had to call Dick W., my mentor ,and he introduced me to the jam chuck. Since them I have made a drawer full of jam chucks of all shapes and sizes and usually find one that fits the latest piece. Send me a PM if you want to be introduced to them!!

On these pieces, you have the shape and finish down perfect. They are very nice looking pieces – all of them!!

.....................Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View deeman's profile

deeman

370 posts in 1667 days


#5 posted 402 days ago

I have only made 10 bowls so I am no expert. I turn the tenon off on mine. But I really like the way your bowls look. Whats most important is to make your projects look the way you want them to look. I also understand wanting to make them the right way. Have fun and enjoy the craft.

-- Dennis Trenton Ohio And life is worth the living just because He lives!

View LesB's profile

LesB

1056 posts in 2030 days


#6 posted 402 days ago

I leave them all the time but usually I decorate them up a bit with some concentric rings in the center. That is also where I sign, date, and give the type of wood. I use a vibrating engraver tool for that.
I’m careful to taper the rim of the bottom towards the center so it sets on the outer edge and won’t have a tendency to wobble. I noticed your rounded the outer edges of the bottom’s rim. I think it looks better to leave a sharp edge or make a small undercut (a little notch) which can make it look like the item is “floating” above the surface.
Except on very large items or soft wood I find a tenon of about 3/16” is enough.
I don’t know how you start your work but I found that I can use a router with a dovetail bit, a template guide, and a set of circle patterns of various sizes to cut a tenon in the top of the piece. Then I turn the whole bottom, creating a new tenon in the bottom while I’m at it so I can flip the piece over and complete the inside.

-- Les B, Oregon

View UncleStumpy's profile

UncleStumpy

360 posts in 899 days


#7 posted 401 days ago

Looks like you are getting your honest opinions!
I agree with deeman, YOU are the artist, they should look how YOU want them to look.

-- "They don't want it perfect - they want it SPECIAL"

View Sandra's profile

Sandra

4043 posts in 662 days


#8 posted 401 days ago

I know NOTHING about turning, but I like both of the bowls. Some of the ‘fancier’ bowls I’ve seen here are amazing examples of craftsmanship, but I wouldn’t actually use them for anything. I find both of these very appealing.

If I were at a craft show to buy a wooden bowl, these ones are personally exactly what I would gravitate toward.
I didn’t know the base part of the bowl was a tenon…..

-- No, I don't want to buy the pink hammer.

View Craig Havran's profile

Craig Havran

330 posts in 1198 days


#9 posted 401 days ago

First, your bowls are looking great. It doesn’t appear that you are getting a lot of tearout so you must either enjoy sanding, or you’re keeping your tools sharp. Nice work there. I personally feel your first tenon is a little large for the finished piece. It almost appears to be a feature to the piece and should accentuate it and be functional.

I’m assuming that you are expansion chucking? If this is the case, is there any reason you’re chosing this over compression?

Keep up the good work!

-- "There's plenty of time to read the instruction manual when you're laying in the hospital bed". - Dad

View Nick_R's profile

Nick_R

141 posts in 736 days


#10 posted 401 days ago

Thank you for all the help.. I kind of felt the same way about the first bowl but then ended up liking the profile. I am using expansion because of some video I saw and I have tried compression with good results too. I guess it depends more on my mood than anything else.

I try to keep the tools sharp, but that still frustrates the H$%$%$:LLL out of me. I don’t get alot of tear out because I go sloooooowwww. I had a tool catch several times, once it bent the tool over, and now I am over cautious.

Typically I create the tenon on the lathe then flip the piece over.

I really appreciate the positive comments and honest feedback. This is site is truly one of the things I enjoy most about woodworking and it is a wonderful community.

THANK YOU

-- Hope for the best but plan for the worst. - 7 finger Nick :)

View Craig Havran's profile

Craig Havran

330 posts in 1198 days


#11 posted 401 days ago

Fair enough… I try to use compression chucking whenever I can. I’ve had expansion tenons pop out and feel they do not provide equal strength.

Another question… on your first bowl, was your chuck bottomed out? meaning, was the wood from your tenon touching the steel of your chuck? If so, that’s a big no no. You want a nice square (or dovetailed {depending on style of your chuck} tenon so the wood is flush against the chuck, but not too long of a tenon to touch the chuck as it will take away strength and allow potential movement. I’m not saying that is your case, but it looks like a large tenon and I wanted to be sure you’re getting the full ability of your chuck.

-- "There's plenty of time to read the instruction manual when you're laying in the hospital bed". - Dad

View Nick_R's profile

Nick_R

141 posts in 736 days


#12 posted 401 days ago

The first bowl I turned the tenon deep enough so the bowl bottom was against the face of my chuck. The second more shallow one was not…

-- Hope for the best but plan for the worst. - 7 finger Nick :)

View Craig Havran's profile

Craig Havran

330 posts in 1198 days


#13 posted 401 days ago

That’s good to know… It is a MUST that your bowl registers up against your chuck or you will simply be holding on to a tenon that will move with any sort of catch, or added pressure to the work peice. With your chuck being registerd against the piece, it gives you the added dimension of support to keep your piece running true. This will make for MUCH added pleasure in your turning bowls. It sounds rather insignificant, but I assure you it is paramount to have a good tenon. A tip is to know how deep your jaws are, and then subtract a 1/16” or so. that will give a LOT of wood for your chuck to hold onto and also provide your jaws a place to register against your piece. Hope it helps!

-- "There's plenty of time to read the instruction manual when you're laying in the hospital bed". - Dad

View Nick_R's profile

Nick_R

141 posts in 736 days


#14 posted 401 days ago

good rule of thumb. For clarification, you mean to make the tenon 1/16 deeper than the jaws so the bowl bottom is flush against the jaws?

-- Hope for the best but plan for the worst. - 7 finger Nick :)

View Craig Havran's profile

Craig Havran

330 posts in 1198 days


#15 posted 401 days ago

Exactly the opposite. You do not want your tenon touching the bottom of your chuck, but you want your jaws touching your bowl. Make your tenon 1/16” SHORTER than your jaws. If you have straight or dovetailed jaws will dictate the “shape” of your tenon. Meaning with the angle being 90 degrees for a straight jaw, or dovetailed a bit for a dovetail style jaw.

-- "There's plenty of time to read the instruction manual when you're laying in the hospital bed". - Dad

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