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Roux Spoons, Part Deux

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Project by Don Broussard posted 424 days ago 949 views 5 times favorited 10 comments Add to Favorites Watch
Roux Spoons, Part Deux
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Now that my marking gauge for the tool swap is in the mail, I had a chance to get back on a few backlogged projects.

About 8 months ago, I made and posted this project. My wife needed a few more roux spoons to give away to some special friends. I cut the basic shape out on the bandsaw, then resawed the shapes into two stirrers. Next step was to hand plane the edge on the blade (I used a Stanley No. 40 scrub plane because I like to) then some light rasping on the edges. Last step was sanding with the ROS. No finish was applied—just raw cedar.

EDIT: If you get a chance to participate in a tool swap, don’t hesitate. It is a chance to meet a challenge, to try some new skills you may never would have tried, and to do your best work to send off to a fellow LJ. Plus, you get a tool hand made by a fellow LJ. Highly recommend signing up for the next one—- I suspect I will as well.

-- People say I hammer like lightning. It's not that I'm fast -- it's that I never hit the same place twice!





10 comments so far

View Michael Wilson's profile

Michael Wilson

587 posts in 1086 days


#1 posted 424 days ago

is THAT what those things are called :p

I made a half dozen or so with a coping saw and my belt sander, just ‘cause I like to have them around.

Yours sure look a lot nicer though :)

View Greg The Cajun Box Sculptor's profile

Greg The Cajun Box Sculptor

4928 posts in 1904 days


#2 posted 423 days ago

well, there are the roux spoons…but where is the gumbo?

-- Every step of each project is considered my masterpiece because I want the finished product to reflect the quality of my work.

View Michael Wilson's profile

Michael Wilson

587 posts in 1086 days


#3 posted 423 days ago

is THAT what those things are called :p

I made a half dozen or so with a coping saw and my belt sander, just ‘cause I like to have them around.

Yours sure look a lot nicer though :)

[Whups. How’d that happen?]

View Don Broussard's profile

Don Broussard

1808 posts in 847 days


#4 posted 423 days ago

@mad—Roux spoons or roux stirrers.

@Greg—Spoken like a true Cajun! “Gumbo season” is over until the overnight air temperature dips below 50F, but you already know that!

-- People say I hammer like lightning. It's not that I'm fast -- it's that I never hit the same place twice!

View Handtooler's profile

Handtooler

1054 posts in 727 days


#5 posted 423 days ago

Are the spoon/stirring ends slightly curved or dished out or was the one my Grandmothert used just a wooden spoonthat had stirred so many skillets of chicken gravy and gumbo roux that it was worn down almost flat ended just like those spoons. She’d probably had hers for forty years.

-- Russell Pitner Hixson, TN 37343 bassboy40@msn.com

View Don Broussard's profile

Don Broussard

1808 posts in 847 days


#6 posted 423 days ago

@Hand—This pattern is just a stick shaped in two dimensions. The working end is “sharpened” (really flattened) to scrape the roux during cooking to prevent it from sticking to the bottom of the pot. The angle of the blade just works ergonomically.

-- People say I hammer like lightning. It's not that I'm fast -- it's that I never hit the same place twice!

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

111999 posts in 2172 days


#7 posted 423 days ago

Very nice

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Tim_H's profile

Tim_H

15 posts in 659 days


#8 posted 422 days ago

So here is a non-woodworking related question…..

I am a Chef by trade and was wondering with cedar being so aromatic do you notice any of the “flavor” of the wood leeching into the cooking?

-- "If at first you don't succeed....get a bigger hammer"

View Don Broussard's profile

Don Broussard

1808 posts in 847 days


#9 posted 422 days ago

@TimH—Great question! I haven’t noticed any cedar flavoring in the food. I’m thinking that since the cedar is only in contact with the food’s base of flour and oil, that the spoon is coated with the oil and covers and seals the cedar aroma. Most locals only use the roux spoon during the making of the roux itself and not in stirring the dish during cooking. Also, the base is a small part of the food by volume too. Another advantage of using cedar is that when the item’s service as a roux spoon is done, you can toss it in the charcoal to flavor the meat or fish.

-- People say I hammer like lightning. It's not that I'm fast -- it's that I never hit the same place twice!

View Fishinbo's profile

Fishinbo

11216 posts in 771 days


#10 posted 419 days ago

They are wonderful and useful tools. Great to have in the kitchen and as gifts to family and friends. Great job!

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