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Solid Oak Bucket

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Project by TheeWoodShed posted 05-15-2013 07:04 PM 1456 views 2 times favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch

In the 1700’s and early 1800’s a White Cooper traveled from village to village. He used whatever wood was readily available. In Northwest Ohio, that would have been oak. So I’ve made quite a few oak buckets for folks and today I’m finishing up a well bucket.

The wood came from my woods behind our farm.

PS: The third picture was taken this morning on the porch of my shop in the village. Its my Oak Bucket finished and full of water! The rope handle is also done!

-- "Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life."





15 comments so far

View stefang's profile

stefang

13059 posts in 1993 days


#1 posted 05-15-2013 07:37 PM

Very nice! I am also a bucketeer. here's the one I made awhile back.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View djnphoto's profile

djnphoto

42 posts in 1142 days


#2 posted 05-15-2013 07:41 PM

Very nice work

-- DJNPHOTOWOODWORKING

View doubleDD's profile

doubleDD

2489 posts in 702 days


#3 posted 05-15-2013 07:47 PM

I have seen these made on one of the wood programs and have a vision of trying to make one some day. Hope it looks half as good as this one. Nice work. What about the handle?

-- --Dave, Downers Grove, Il. When you run out of ideas, start building your dreams

View Oldtool's profile

Oldtool

1825 posts in 849 days


#4 posted 05-15-2013 08:04 PM

OK, I think I’ve found my next experiment in woodworking. As I learn of now or different woodworking techniques, it seems I want to try them for myself. This looks like a real good candidate for my next adventure into the world of wood craft.
While I understand the geometry of the staves, the various angles involved in obtaining a tight fit, I’m curious to see how it’s done. – without using today’s advanced machinery of course. I viewed what I thought to be a very good video on coopering at Folkstreams, http://www.folkstreams.net/film,224 and find to be very fasenating.

I’ve got to try this. Thanks for showing

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View TheeWoodShed's profile

TheeWoodShed

162 posts in 569 days


#5 posted 05-15-2013 08:58 PM

DoubleDD, I am going to use a rope… I weave an eye splice on each side for the handle.

Oldtool, Thats what I do for a “living”.... I’m a Cooper at a historical village in NW Ohio. Making buckets by hand is so rewarding. I tell my students, all it takes is time and patience!” Heavy emphasis on the patience. Takes around 10 to 12 hours to make one by hand. We start with logs around 10’ long, give or take and then saw, split and carve the staves. Love doing it. When you walk into our village, its like walking back in time 200 years.

Stefang, great job on that bucket!!! You did a great job! One thing that would help with the drying (cant really help it, as mother nature does her thing), is a nice coat of natural tung oil generously applied. On some of my buckets I use food safe mineral oil due to some of my clients using them for drinking and or cooking.

-- "Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life."

View Belg1960's profile

Belg1960

803 posts in 1724 days


#6 posted 05-15-2013 11:02 PM

Another great piece!! What are the hoops made of and how are they secured in place?

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!

View Kevin's profile

Kevin

539 posts in 958 days


#7 posted 05-15-2013 11:09 PM

Beautiful work. I wish I had more time, I really want to do more with hand tools. You do amazing work.

-- Measure twice, cut once, then rout a whole bunch

View doubleDD's profile

doubleDD

2489 posts in 702 days


#8 posted 05-15-2013 11:14 PM

Rope, of course. That is fitting. Again beautiful job.

-- --Dave, Downers Grove, Il. When you run out of ideas, start building your dreams

View TheeWoodShed's profile

TheeWoodShed

162 posts in 569 days


#9 posted 05-16-2013 12:07 AM

Pat, its a processed willow banding. I think they call it 3/4” quarter round. I by it by the case for the village and then I buy coils of it for the shop.

Back in the day, like you can see on Stefang’s bucket, (if you havent, check it out) it looks like he used saplings to band his. In our region we would have used hickory saplings back in the 1800’s. The willow is just so much easier for me and it leaves a nice look.

Thanks for the kind comments… and DoubleDD, I will add a picture of the roped finished piece.

-- "Choose a job you love, and you will never have to work a day in your life."

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112106 posts in 2236 days


#10 posted 05-16-2013 02:02 AM

Nice work

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

14252 posts in 997 days


#11 posted 05-16-2013 02:45 AM

Awesome work as always sir

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View TheTalkingGrape's profile

TheTalkingGrape

266 posts in 516 days


#12 posted 05-16-2013 05:23 AM

View Ken90712's profile

Ken90712

14947 posts in 1847 days


#13 posted 05-16-2013 08:53 AM

That is cool. Have to try this.

-- Ken, "Everyday above ground is a good day!"

View Belg1960's profile

Belg1960

803 posts in 1724 days


#14 posted 05-18-2013 11:49 AM

Mark, thanks for the explanation. I guessed bamboo but I guess that would not have been available to the early settlers. I saw the rope handle on Facebook, now they are ready for operation.

-- ***Pat*** Rookie woodworker looking for an education!!!

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

15824 posts in 1525 days


#15 posted 05-18-2013 01:10 PM

I love to see work like this. It is so interesting. Nice job and also good to know that you harvested your own wood for it.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

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