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First attempt at restoration.

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Project by irishhandyman posted 07-02-2008 03:00 PM 1019 views 0 times favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch

The title says it all. More info is in the blog about this piece. Brief description. 80+ year old funiture, been in the same house belonging to the same family for same time. LOTS OF SANDING. Learned a lot. Turned out better than I had hoped. Any suggestions about what you think I should have done differently would be greatly appreciated.

-- God bless the men and women who protect our counrty.





13 comments so far

View CharlieM1958's profile

CharlieM1958

15698 posts in 2874 days


#1 posted 07-02-2008 03:18 PM

That looks great!

-- Charlie M. "Woodworking - patience = firewood"

View Greg Wurst's profile

Greg Wurst

781 posts in 2488 days


#2 posted 07-02-2008 03:20 PM

Looks pretty-good!

-- You're a unique and special person, just like everyone else.

View Paul's profile

Paul

649 posts in 2748 days


#3 posted 07-02-2008 05:42 PM

Looks great!

in respect to your request for “suggestions” – nothing specific, but just my experience – I’m a bit of a beginner on the restoration side of things as well – still reading and experimenting with various techniques and products. But, just like so many things, reading and “experimenting” does seem to be the way to go. Sometimes heavy sanding, stripping, scraping is the way to go – other times, one of the “touch-up” products like Formby’s or Howard’s is all that’s needed.

I’ve said several times on restoration projects over the past couple of years, “Well, that didn’t work.” (Stop, read, research, study, examine products on-line or at the hardware store, etc. etc.) Then, “I guess I’ll try this.”

Sometimes practical things like how much time and expense the piece worth to you or a client is a big factor as well because, as you know, restoration takes time and patience.

-- Paul, Texas

View sharad's profile

sharad

1063 posts in 2460 days


#4 posted 07-02-2008 05:51 PM

Very happy to see a restoration project because I am fond of restoring old wooden articles. Recently I have found an electric two pin plug made out of wood. It must be very old. It is very cute and I am going to restore it and try to make a new one. I also have a very old wooden cupboard ( about 75 years) which I am thinking of restoring. You have done your restoring project very nicely.
Sharad

-- “If someone feels that they had never made a mistake in their life, then it means they have never tried a new thing in their life”.-Albert Einstein

View irishhandyman's profile

irishhandyman

96 posts in 2332 days


#5 posted 07-02-2008 06:29 PM

Thanks a lot Paul and sharad. Paul, I may contact you from time to time if I run into a stumper. This first attempt was fun for me. The final result turned out better than I had hoped. Sharad, I hope you are going to blog your work. I would be very interested in what you have going on. Thanks for the compliments folks.
Sure do appreciate it. I am surprised its had as many views. I do have one question. What would the style of this dresser be? I dont know what you call it, but I like the style and the way it was constructed. T-G and dowel was the majority of the construction. The real shocker was finding pocket hole screws with slotted screws holding the top on. Other than 9 screws, that was the only original metal fastiners. Any info would be great.

-- God bless the men and women who protect our counrty.

View Texasgaloot's profile

Texasgaloot

464 posts in 2356 days


#6 posted 07-02-2008 07:54 PM

Top 0’the marnin’, Handyman…

I’m thinking that you did a fine job on this piece. We’ve had several in our family that have somehow slipped through the cracks before I could get a hold of them. They were built in the years prior to WWII, which makes me think in terms of the 1920’s, and they all had rural roots. Some might even say, “Country.”

Well done!

-- There's no tool like an old tool...

View irishhandyman's profile

irishhandyman

96 posts in 2332 days


#7 posted 07-02-2008 08:37 PM

Well thank ya Mr. galoot. There are several pieces in my home that are real old. All from about the 20’s or so. There are 2 solid walnut chest of drawers that are beautiful. Someday when I get more confidence and l really think I could tackle it, I want to refinish them. Thanks for the kind words Tex. If I wore a hat I would tip it.

-- God bless the men and women who protect our counrty.

View TedM's profile

TedM

2002 posts in 2388 days


#8 posted 07-02-2008 11:27 PM

Looks great!

-- I'm a wood magician... I can turn fine lumber into firewood before your very eyes! - Please visit http://www.woodworkersguide.com and sign up for my project updates!

View Chris 's profile

Chris

1867 posts in 2647 days


#9 posted 07-03-2008 12:13 AM

Nice restoration… The color seems nice and even; I’ve found that to be one of the bigger challenges for me when doing this kind of work. Was it only sanding or did you have to employ other means?

-- "Everything that is great and inspiring is created by the individual who labors in freedom" -- Albert Einstein

View irishhandyman's profile

irishhandyman

96 posts in 2332 days


#10 posted 07-03-2008 02:50 AM

Chris, I started out with 1/4 sheet sander with 60 grit. From that I went to an orbital with 80 and then down to 100. Because I didnt want to lose any of the crisp edges I used a corse steel wool. You mentioned the color being even. I had one problem area that just wouldnt come out. If you look real close to the bottom drawer front there is some dark stain thats DEEEEEEP in the grain that just wouldnt lift out. If I would have had the money I would have used striper. The top has what I would call ghost stains. Personaly I kind of like it. It dont look like a piece that came from any borg store. It has blemishes that I am sure has storys behind them that I will neven know. The real challlenge was getting the old glue out of the groves and off the dowels. Being old at it was I am going to assume it was some form of animal glue.

-- God bless the men and women who protect our counrty.

View Bradford's profile

Bradford

1434 posts in 2479 days


#11 posted 07-03-2008 03:25 AM

Was it an heirloom piece from a collection? I read once that refinishing a piece sometimes depreciates it. I am not an expert on that, but I like how it turned out thanks for posting.

-- so much wood, so little time. Bradford. Wood-a-holics unanimous president

View irishhandyman's profile

irishhandyman

96 posts in 2332 days


#12 posted 07-03-2008 03:49 AM

Most details about this piece are lost to history. From what my brother told me it was moved into this house by our Grandmother. It did have a mirror mounted to it but was broken and the wooden pieces were lost back in the 50’s. My grandfather owned a general store back in the early 1900’s and was bought out by the government around 1920. I found a little piece of paper on the back and it has writing on it. Something about Indiana. I wish I had more info but I dont. What makes it special to me is that it belonged to my Grandma and has been in this house for over 80 years. Probably not worth much money, but I wouldnt trade it for anything. I hope I can pass it down to one of my kids someday. Just have to see how good my reassembly work pans out. ;-)

-- God bless the men and women who protect our counrty.

View irishhandyman's profile

irishhandyman

96 posts in 2332 days


#13 posted 07-03-2008 04:07 AM

Well this is all that is left of the tag. I guess I ended up losing the part that had Indiana on it. If anyone has any info sure would appreciate it.

-- God bless the men and women who protect our counrty.

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