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Router Plane Sled

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Project by Kevin posted 453 days ago 4156 views 34 times favorited 16 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I’ve been wanting to make one of these, just a quick little thing. Finally got around to it. I wanted to make some clock faces out of walnut cookie slabs from a tree my Dad had cut down and I needed this to plane the faces. Right now I’m just using a combination of grip mat, boards and clamps to hold the piece down while routing. Eventually I’ll incorporate t-track into the base with hold down blocks that can be tightened up around the log. Its made mostly out of scraps I had laying around with a good coat of paste wax to keep things sliding nice. Last pic is my first planning job (one of the pieces of walnut). Thanks for looking.

-- Measure twice, cut once, then rout a whole bunch





16 comments so far

View Oldtool's profile

Oldtool

1745 posts in 789 days


#1 posted 453 days ago

Nice build Kevin, looks like a winner. What router bit did you use? bowl or end cut? I’ve used a end cut straight bit in a jig like this, but was thinking a bowl bit might leave a smoother finish.
Enjoy the new toy.

-- "I am a firm believer in the people. If given the truth, they can be depended upon to meet any national crisis. The point is to bring them the real facts." - Abraham Lincoln

View Kevin's profile

Kevin

539 posts in 897 days


#2 posted 452 days ago

Thanks Tom. I used a bowl bit, I believe 1 1/8”. It did give me a pretty smooth finish. I followed up with 80, 100, 150, and 220 grit papers on my random orbital sander. It’s amazing how smooth endgrain can become.

-- Measure twice, cut once, then rout a whole bunch

View Mark55's profile

Mark55

116 posts in 662 days


#3 posted 452 days ago

Nice simple effective jig. Good job!
I use my routermill to flatten these slabs and I found the best and easiest way to mount them is just use 4 dots of hot glue toward the outside edge. It works every time, it is simple, the glue holds firm when routing but pops off easy when you are done, plus there is no danger of the mounting hardware getting in the way of the router bit.

-- Mark, Newton, NC. www.routermillwoodworks.weebly.com

View Kevin's profile

Kevin

539 posts in 897 days


#4 posted 452 days ago

Thanks MARK good idea with the hot glue I’m definitely going to do that.

-- Measure twice, cut once, then rout a whole bunch

View woodworkerscott's profile

woodworkerscott

357 posts in 1412 days


#5 posted 452 days ago

Cool sled. I have one similar for walnut slabs I use for tables and benches. I use an end cut router bit. Have been considering the bowl bit and will try it now. Thanks for posting.

-- " 'woodworker'.....it's a good word, an honest word." - Sam Maloof

View josh's profile

josh

884 posts in 1168 days


#6 posted 452 days ago

I think end grain get’s smoother than side grain. You should go for some 320 grit.

-- Josh; Former Pennsylvanian, current Coloradan

View JoeBama's profile

JoeBama

15 posts in 458 days


#7 posted 452 days ago

Love it! Simple but very functional. These slabs are being used frequently in local weddings for table decor. I have had several calls for lending walnut slabs to brides for receptions. I will be making one of these jigs to smooth the slabs for continuity. Thanks for posting.

-- JoeBama, Madison, Al. jdharless57@knology.net

View Kevin's profile

Kevin

539 posts in 897 days


#8 posted 452 days ago

Thanks Scott, Josh, and Joe. Glad to help.

-- Measure twice, cut once, then rout a whole bunch

View Mark's profile

Mark

372 posts in 573 days


#9 posted 452 days ago

Nice job Kevin. I gotta build me one of those. I’m going to be re sawing some 4/4 X 6 cherry into 1/8X6 strips. I don’t have a planner or jointer. Do you think a router sled would work to resuface the strips? Thanks

-- Mark

View Kevin's profile

Kevin

539 posts in 897 days


#10 posted 452 days ago

Mark, as long as you build the sled to work for the dimensions you need it should work. Good luck, hope it works for you.

-- Measure twice, cut once, then rout a whole bunch

View Kevin's profile

Kevin

539 posts in 897 days


#11 posted 452 days ago

One thing I can say though, I used my plunge router for mine which makes micro adjustments hard. But I don’t really need micro adjustments for what I’m doing. If you need micro adjustments to the depth of cut a regular router base may work better. For me it was easier to set my depth stop on my plunge base and then use the plunge lock to move my depth. Hope this helps.

-- Measure twice, cut once, then rout a whole bunch

View kaschimer's profile

kaschimer

89 posts in 988 days


#12 posted 452 days ago

I made something similar a few years back to flatten out some boards I had joined for a cabinet door. I like your much better because it looks so much sturdier than the thing I made! LOL Well done and thanks for sharing

-- Steve, Michigan - "Every piece of work is a self portrait of the person who accomplished it - autograph your work with excellence!" - Author unknown

View Kevin's profile

Kevin

539 posts in 897 days


#13 posted 452 days ago

Thanks Steve.

-- Measure twice, cut once, then rout a whole bunch

View Sanding2day's profile

Sanding2day

922 posts in 445 days


#14 posted 444 days ago

Very nice… I am still in a holding pattern for attaining a planer and will certainly be able to take advantage of making a similar sled. Thanks for sharing…

-- Dan

View Kevin's profile

Kevin

539 posts in 897 days


#15 posted 443 days ago

Thanks Dan.

-- Measure twice, cut once, then rout a whole bunch

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