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Bandsaw box meets Mitered joint with splines box.

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Project by Blackie_ posted 04-22-2013 04:53 PM 1809 views 2 times favorited 17 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I was commissioned to build this custom valet box for a customer, she specified it was for her 9 year old nephew’s first Holy Communion and wanted his initials and a cross so I came up with what you see here, the box is a two part box, the bottom part where the drawer is was done on the bandsaw thus the bandsaw box part, the rest of the box is joined together wrapped around the bandsaw box with miter joints and splines with an added hinged lid, the wood used in this project was Alder for the inner core, walnut for the body and Maple for the splines, cross and drawer pull.

I’ve not yet ventured into inlays as I would have liked the cross inlaid so was hoping that anyone of LJS veterans box makers could enlighten me on how I could have or how it’s done, tools, method etc… inlaying the cross on the lid, would be greatly appreciated.

Measurements for this box are 6 1/2 “ high x 6 1/2” deep x 11” long

Thanks for looking and comments are always welcomed.

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs





17 comments so far

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

5041 posts in 1509 days


#1 posted 04-22-2013 05:28 PM

Randy,

Haven’t done one yet, but it requires a template, in this case small bushings for your router. Bushing rides the template. Gradual plowing with router.

I’m pretty sure there is a tutorial on this on LJ’s.

“Mighty Nice Piece Sir!”

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View Greg..the Cajun  Box Sculptor's profile

Greg..the Cajun Box Sculptor

5142 posts in 1975 days


#2 posted 04-22-2013 06:25 PM

Nice box Randy…! I have not done inlays but you should not have any problem getting advice from those who know what they are doing..

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

14344 posts in 1004 days


#3 posted 04-22-2013 06:57 PM

I have not done inlays yet, but it’s high on the list.

Beautiful work

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it.

View a1Jim's profile (online now)

a1Jim

112165 posts in 2243 days


#4 posted 04-22-2013 07:09 PM

Nice work

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View Blackie_'s profile

Blackie_

3445 posts in 1179 days


#5 posted 04-22-2013 08:03 PM

Ah Ok Thomas I have an idea of what you are talking about.

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

5041 posts in 1509 days


#6 posted 04-22-2013 09:22 PM

I think shipwright just posted something about his early marquetry using the same procedure. Parquetry and marquetry, do an inlay.

Let us see how it goes?

good luck.

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View Surfside's profile

Surfside

3194 posts in 840 days


#7 posted 04-22-2013 09:32 PM

The beauty and elegance of this band saw box is truly outstanding! The wood, finish and design are amazing.

-- "someone has to be wounded for others to be saved, someone has to sacrifice for others to feel happiness, someone has to die so others could live"

View Jim Jakosh's profile

Jim Jakosh

11559 posts in 1772 days


#8 posted 04-22-2013 10:05 PM

Nice one,Randy!!..........Jim

-- Jim Jakosh.....Practical Wood Products...........Learn something new every day!! Variety is the Spice of Life!!

View Blackie_'s profile

Blackie_

3445 posts in 1179 days


#9 posted 04-22-2013 10:30 PM

Thanks everyone

Thomas, I just watched a video on Marquetry, I’m not sure I have the patience for fret work and it appears that’s what Marquetry entails, I barely even like using my scroll saw, LOL I just have to be in the mood for it. A router type of inlay, I can do that.

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

10981 posts in 1356 days


#10 posted 04-23-2013 12:43 AM

That turned out very nice and the recipient should be well pleased.

Inlays aren’t too tough. I bought the bushing/bit/template kit from Woodcraft. But I make my own templates now from 1/4”masonite or plywood. The bushing thing won’t fit a lot of routers so I had to buy a “Universal Base Plate” as well.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

5041 posts in 1509 days


#11 posted 04-23-2013 01:26 AM

Yep the marquetry is pretty delicate , yet many principals are similar.

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View AngieO's profile

AngieO

1172 posts in 813 days


#12 posted 04-23-2013 01:59 AM

Love it!

View Boxguy's profile

Boxguy

1479 posts in 934 days


#13 posted 04-23-2013 09:54 AM

Blackie, very nice job on the box you built. Here is an alternative method that Derrick and I worked out for a similar commission he had for a box with a cross on top. The box pictured has quarter-sawn oak sides, mahogany corner splines, with a mahogany top and an ebony cross inlay.

First divide the mahogany top into three pieces with cross-grain cuts. The center piece is as wide as the horizontal arms of the cross. This center is now the part you will work on.

Cut a 1/4 inch deep dado groove in the center piece of the mahogany top from top to bottom and then from side to side to form the inset groove for the cross. With a jig we cut two equal 45s on the inside ends of each arm. Now when you slide the pointed ends together in the dadoed groove you can get them to match up perfectly. It is a very neat touch, but you could just slide the horizontal arms against the vertical arm.

Cut your ebony inserts a little long. Glue in the ebony inserts and when the glue dries you trim away the extra length of the 4 arms that extends beyond the edges of the center mahogany piece. Now you have the cross inlaid into the center section.

The three mahogany pieces of the top are glued back together into one piece.

The ebony inlay is then sanded flush with the mahogany top.

Obviously this method only works with a straight shape like a cross. If the top (mahogany) has a straight grain, the cross cuts that divide the top into three pieces are hardly noticeable.

Once you set up the dado, everything is just miter saw cuts and gluing. We make up 6 to 8 tops while we have everything set up and save the tops for future boxes. Many denominations of churches have a confirmation program around Easter. These sell then.

This is one done with Black Limba sides, mahogany top and ebony insert.

-- Big Al in IN

View Blackie_'s profile

Blackie_

3445 posts in 1179 days


#14 posted 04-23-2013 12:20 PM

Very nice Big Al thank you so much for posting this, a great help and will give this a shot, though I don’t have a dado blade for my table saw, I’d have to find a different way to cut the dados. I did however follow Andys advise and took a look at what woodcraft offered and found this in which I just purchased the Milescraft Design/Inlay Kit for my router, I found the same item and model half the price at Homedepot and ordered online.

-- Randy - If I'm not on LJ's then I'm making Saw Dust. Please feel free to visit my store location at http://www.facebook.com/randy.blackstock.custom.wood.designs

View Roger's profile

Roger

14660 posts in 1470 days


#15 posted 04-23-2013 02:05 PM

Nice build Randy

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Kentuk55@bellsouth.net

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