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Manzanita Burl Bowl #4

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Project by Eric M. Saperstein posted 04-12-2013 03:57 AM 768 views 1 time favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch

OK – presenting manzanita bowl #4 … if you’re following this series there are 5 bowls posted to date. We have a lot more blanks, and there’s a whole bunch of little details posted in the various projects. We’re spinning lots of stuff, its fun and its hopefully going to be profitable.

This is a very simple form, no epoxy imparted in or fancy additional materials. Going forward we’re going to play around with more complex epoxy castings. This bowl again had some nice texture and I decided to leave it natural. It also didn’t attempt to split apart and smack me in the face while turning it – that also played well in the decision to keep it all wood!

-- Eric M. Saperstein, Master Craftsman www.artisansofthevalley.com





5 comments so far

View deon's profile

deon

2243 posts in 1778 days


#1 posted 04-12-2013 07:20 AM

Amazing grain

-- Dreaming patterns

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

1282 posts in 1049 days


#2 posted 04-12-2013 12:45 PM

Beautiful. Any way to get them thinner, or will they just fall apart?

View Eric M. Saperstein's profile

Eric M. Saperstein

766 posts in 2000 days


#3 posted 04-12-2013 01:17 PM

“Thin” is subjective … so far I’ve gotten manzanita down to about 1/4” and have been afraid to destroy the piece going further. Some of this bowl is down to that, the upper lip curves in a bit and has the rim so it appears thicker than it is.

Another bowl posted there is a section that went through, it was down to 1/16th inch which was fine when the piece was wet it turned and held. Then it dried and split – which is OK I like the natural impact of the drying process it ripples and veins and distorts to a very unique shape.

I have not seen super thin manzanita very often – it can be done but … its a little scary!

I need better tool rests – I plan to make some soon that follow contours better that allow me to get very close and turn thinner. Right now I have 3 rests, and I am limited in reach and such. We did just get a hollowing setup – more on that soon too. Gotta set it up w/ the cool laser gauges and all that fun stuff.

I’m going to try to find a bowl that is proper to thin turn either natural or cast with epoxy – TBD. I have been adding tools to our inventory to improve our ability to get thin and detailed. It’s also a skill factor – I may be a master of many things with wood but turning was never really a prominent aspect of our portfolio. It was mainly done as spindles or small items for chairs, etc.

We recently got to upgrading our lathe, the motor control / speed control was dying and there were no replacement parts available … We have an old Delta DL-40 which is now 3HP/3PH variable. We’re continuing to work on it we’re going to double the pulley setup to a dual belt and make some other changes. Eventually I’ll get a OneWay but can’t justify it or afford it right now.

I am going to post the Delta upgrade project ASAP. For $390 we changed out the motor and controller a few $ in wire and a friend that’s an electrician and WOW.

Thanks!

-- Eric M. Saperstein, Master Craftsman www.artisansofthevalley.com

View dhazelton's profile

dhazelton

1282 posts in 1049 days


#4 posted 04-12-2013 02:57 PM

My first bowl looked okay and then I put it in a bag to dry for a while and it turned into an oval. Wood lives even when it’s dead.

I have one of those big Delta lathes I picked up from a school. I need a VFD for it though as it’s three phase.

View Eric M. Saperstein's profile

Eric M. Saperstein

766 posts in 2000 days


#5 posted 04-13-2013 02:33 AM

Check ebay for the VFD I got one as I mentioned for $115 and it seems to be working quite nicely. The only thing I don’t like is the whine – but I’m getting used to that I guess.

I like the ovals – I like distortion. If you don’t want it to warp you have to go through some lengths. Pack it with its own chips and let it dry very slowly, etc. Honestly I’m not patient, so I’d rather let it run its course and crack and twist.

We’re figuring we will put in butterflies, leather laces, epoxy, random interesting splices. What can be repeated isn’t unique enough to me when it comes to something like this.

I can build a gothic table, build another one, build another one. No two are exactly the same given the wood and other factors but still I build the same basic structure. When you get into turnings, especially with rotten or exotic burls you can’t ever really replicate anything again.

Then someone wanders by and loves it and appreciates it – your work goes to a good home. That’s fun, and hopefully profitable!

-- Eric M. Saperstein, Master Craftsman www.artisansofthevalley.com

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