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Eucalyptus Burl Small Jewelry Box

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Project by Thomas Porter posted 03-18-2007 09:29 PM 1864 views 0 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This was a quick project that I used to hone some more inlay techniques. I turned this small jewelry box and inlayed the initial of the person I was making it for in the top from black ebony. It was my second turning. I think I’m addicted.

-- Thomas Porter, Phoenix, AZ, www.thomasporter.com





11 comments so far

View Karson's profile

Karson

34912 posts in 3145 days


#1 posted 03-18-2007 09:32 PM

Did you use a bandsaw to cut out the inside of the box, or did you use your gouge.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2905 days


#2 posted 03-18-2007 09:35 PM

this is great!!
With outcomes like this you would have to be addicted—I can image that the ideas are flowing and you are “itching” to try something new

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View Thomas Porter's profile

Thomas Porter

127 posts in 2876 days


#3 posted 03-18-2007 09:49 PM

I used a 3” forstner bit to cut out the inside. I used a table saw to cut the top off of the main turning. I used a router with a rabbitting bit to make the lip for the lid. I should post some pictures. Hold on… I’ll find the project pictures and make a big image out of them to post. Give me 20 min.

-- Thomas Porter, Phoenix, AZ, www.thomasporter.com

View rentman's profile

rentman

230 posts in 2839 days


#4 posted 03-18-2007 09:56 PM

very nice

-- Phil, Chattanooga,TN

View Thomas Porter's profile

Thomas Porter

127 posts in 2876 days


#5 posted 03-18-2007 09:59 PM

Here’ you go… the whole process (6 hours total)
Eucalyptus Burl Jewelry Box

-- Thomas Porter, Phoenix, AZ, www.thomasporter.com

View scottb's profile

scottb

3648 posts in 3072 days


#6 posted 03-18-2007 10:58 PM

Nice. and Thanks for showing the behind the scenes.

-- I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it. - Van Gogh -- http://blanchardcreative.etsy.com -- http://snbcreative.wordpress.com/

View MsDebbieP's profile

MsDebbieP

18615 posts in 2905 days


#7 posted 03-19-2007 12:02 AM

that’s excellent!!!

(Scott.. aren’t you busy posting YOUR next project??)

Thomas, is that a rotary tool plunge router you used for the initial?

-- ~ Debbie, Canada (https://www.facebook.com/DebbiePribeleENJOConsultant)

View Karson's profile

Karson

34912 posts in 3145 days


#8 posted 03-19-2007 01:00 AM

Thomas

Thanks for the insite. I would have thought of the forstner bit as a risky cut, because if the box came loose it could have shattered it.

Very nice.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View dennis mitchell's profile

dennis mitchell

3994 posts in 3059 days


#9 posted 03-19-2007 02:47 AM

Interesting box.

View Thomas Porter's profile

Thomas Porter

127 posts in 2876 days


#10 posted 03-19-2007 02:49 AM

The forstner bit was easy because it was greenwood. It was also secured in a drill press machinists vise. I used the vise to line it up exactly, and the forstner bit was very sharp and running at 300 rpm. I took my time so it didn’t shatter. I also have a great drill press. That was one of my best purchases. Powermatic 20” 1.5 hp floor model. I was also using compressed air to blow the shavings out as it went along.

-- Thomas Porter, Phoenix, AZ, www.thomasporter.com

View Thomas Porter's profile

Thomas Porter

127 posts in 2876 days


#11 posted 03-19-2007 05:45 AM

Here’s the router base I use – click here

The “router base” I used with my dremel is from Stewart-MacDonald, a luthierie supply company. It’s a great base and I bought the package which inluded some other goodies. The air-blowing option is a must. It blows the dust away so your can see what you’re doing. It also helps keep the bits from cutting the material more than once – makes them last longer. I used some inlay bits that I purchase at a local jewelry supply. This is a great tool for inlay. I would like to try cutting inlay sometime on a scroll saw (future purchase), but for now, the dremel with the router base and needle files for finishing seem to do the trick.

-- Thomas Porter, Phoenix, AZ, www.thomasporter.com

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