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Shipping Skids

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Project by PASs posted 411 days ago 2101 views 0 times favorited 16 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I got a contract for 26 shipping skids to carry Launching Engine Cylinder Covers for the USS Enterprise (CVN 65)) as part of her decommissioning.

Each Cylinder Cover assembly is 12 feet long, 15 inches wide, 5 inches tall and weighs about 900 pounds.
The skids are designed to carry 2 covers nested between 4×6 runners.
The runners and stringers are assembled with 1/2 by 10 inch galvanized hex bolts with the heads countersunk into the bottom of the stringers.
Average assembly time was 30 minutes including moving material, cutting, drilling, and assembly.

From the profits on this I get a MIG welder and a cutting torch setup….MORE TOYS!!!

More details in the blog section.

-- Pete, "It isn't broken, you just aren't using it right."





16 comments so far

View Hawaiilad's profile

Hawaiilad

1672 posts in 1524 days


#1 posted 411 days ago

It feels good to make some extra money to buy more tools so you can make something to sell so you can buy more tools…..OK, I’ll stop now. 900 lbs…wow, how did you move them arround

-- Larry in sunny and warm Hawaii,

View bluekingfisher's profile

bluekingfisher

957 posts in 1482 days


#2 posted 411 days ago

Sounds like you got a result there mate, being an ex Navy man has served you well in winning that contract.

HI ad a look at some of your pictures from your blog section, not impressed with the finger shot…... Ouch!

-- No one plans to fail, they just, just fail to plan

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

10844 posts in 841 days


#3 posted 411 days ago

Jobs are good. Paying jobs better. Keep it up.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it. - It's not ability that we often lack, but the patience to use our ability

View stefang's profile

stefang

11824 posts in 1837 days


#4 posted 410 days ago

Well done. Doing woodwork for the Navy, couldn’t be better. I seem to remember replenishing food supplies to the Enterprise at sea 54 years ago.It’s sad to hear that she will be decommissioned. It sure looked huge seen from our little reefer, the USS Zelima. This photo shows what I’m talking about. I don’t know which carrier that is as I obtained this pic from the web only recently, but the center ship is the Zelima. Wonderful memories!

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View nonickswood's profile

nonickswood

353 posts in 890 days


#5 posted 410 days ago

Well Done Pete,
Looks like some cold weather, wish it would warm-up around here!
New Toys- Yeah!!

-- Nick, Virginia, http://www.etsy.com/shop/NONICKSWOOD

View stefang's profile

stefang

11824 posts in 1837 days


#6 posted 410 days ago

Well done Pete. Doing woodwork for the Navy, couldn’t be better. I seem to remember replenishing food supplies to the Enterprise (or maybe the Forrestal) at sea 54 years ago.It’s sad to hear that she will be decommissioned. those carriers sure looked huge seen from our little reefer, the USS Zelima. Worse yet, one of them put a hole in our side, not keeping on station. This photo shows what I’m talking about. I don’t know which carrier that is as I obtained this pic from the web only recently, but the center ship is the Zelima on which I served for almost 4 years. Wonderful memories!

My apologies for the double post. I wanted to add some info and ran out of time, so wound up with two.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View jeffswildwood's profile

jeffswildwood

325 posts in 480 days


#7 posted 410 days ago

Nice to get a job like this doing something you love to do. And getting new toys. Makes me a bit sad though as I sailed on the Big E in 1978 with RVAH-1 Smokin Tigers squadron. Showing my age.

View PASs's profile

PASs

511 posts in 1601 days


#8 posted 410 days ago

Thanks for the comments and pics…..

Hawaiilad,
The covers are 900 each…but they will be loaded later.
I don’t have access to a forklift at the location, so I have to get the folks there to move anything with a forklift for me.
I hate to do that as a matter of production, so I moved the lumber to the cutting and drilling area, cut it, drill it, and then move it to the assembly area.
We started on the ground and then build them on top of each other.
The boss….er…wife took a bunch of pics and video of the last one going together….I just haven’t had a chance to upload them to the blog yet….workin’ it.
r/
Pete

-- Pete, "It isn't broken, you just aren't using it right."

View Ken90712's profile

Ken90712

14500 posts in 1692 days


#9 posted 410 days ago

Congrats to you… I was on the Big E from 1985-89 What a great ship….. Nice work.

-- Ken, "Everyday above ground is a good day!"

View Napaman's profile

Napaman

5276 posts in 2580 days


#10 posted 410 days ago

wow….those are huge—-will you post pictures when the engine cylinder covers are on the skids? It would be cool to see!

-- Matt--Proud LJ since 2007

View Mike Gager's profile

Mike Gager

615 posts in 1770 days


#11 posted 410 days ago

my brother was on the enterprise when he was in the navy. not sure what years but im pretty sure it was during the war (viet nam) he told me stories about some of the marines that would be on board for transport or whatever that would have interesting necklaces

anyways he passed away last year. sad to see they are decommisioning it

View Pallirondack's profile

Pallirondack

66 posts in 665 days


#12 posted 410 days ago

Awesome! Now why can’t I find pallets/skids like that to build my projects?! lol….

Getting paid is always nice.

-- David, Spring Hill, FL -- making projects from recycled pallets

View emart's profile

emart

221 posts in 1131 days


#13 posted 410 days ago

those are monsters. must be cool to know you had a hand in that project. on a side note. what type of welder are you getting? I have a little lincoln 140 myself

-- tools are only as good as the hands that hold them https://www.custommade.com/by/emeraldcrafts/

View PASs's profile

PASs

511 posts in 1601 days


#14 posted 408 days ago

thanks all for the comments so far….good to be working….but I’ll admit, working in 30 mph wind at 38 degrees was interesting. I put hothands inside my gloves, right in the palms…worked well, and added some shock protection too.

emart, was actually thinking about the 140 myself.
How do you like it?
I have 220 in my shop, so I thought I might step up to the 180, but if my son borrows it he only has 120…oh wait….then he COULDN’T borrow the 180. ahahahhahahha

-- Pete, "It isn't broken, you just aren't using it right."

View emart's profile

emart

221 posts in 1131 days


#15 posted 407 days ago

it works pretty good for hobbyist level. with some prep work you can mig weld up to 1/4 inch and it can do self shield up to 5/16 though that’s the absolute limit to what it can do. another option if you have some deep pockets is a miller 211. that one can do 110 and 220 but its pretty spendy. nice thing is if you keep an eye on craigslist you can get a used 140 for as little as $250

i call it the little red welder. as you can see the cart isnt stock

-- tools are only as good as the hands that hold them https://www.custommade.com/by/emeraldcrafts/

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