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Practical Winter Workshop Finland

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Project by AJM posted 512 days ago 1190 views 2 times favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Being an English man in Finland the winter has come as a bit of a challenge to me. Where my tools are the temperatures as cold as -20 which means all the wood glues, oils, painds and varnishes will be moved in doors next winter as a lot of them froze quite solid.
I could not do fine accurate work as such it was more of run in do what i could til the cold made me run back in doors.
Fish trivets was a nice project which was when i discovered freezing glue. I used rope about 8 -10 mm in diameter as the back bone. wood was pine boards which was left over from boarding the house 3 years ago.

Double bird feeder. I made this as i am a big fan of lazy bird spotting. Earlier in the year i bought 10€ of scrap wood from the local wood shop and this is the only thing I made with the bits and bobs so far.

Blu Ray Shelf and a bin. A slight miscalculation on the dvd rack turned it quite quickly in to a bluray and playstation 3 gaming rack. Much to the joy of my stepdaughter. The drink on the shelf picture was to prove it was not wonky.. the bin was fun to make and even though its pine/spruce it weighs alot.
Last picture is of me realising that they can have snow falls of 40cm+ and then snow drifts.

Winter is sort of ending now i hope.. I will post my future efforts.

Regards

-- Englishman in Finland I am guessing that i am Finglish.





15 comments so far

View Monte Pittman's profile

Monte Pittman

13258 posts in 936 days


#1 posted 512 days ago

I feel your pain with the cold shop. Something I have to correct here before next winter.

Hope you warm up and all is well.

-- Mother Nature created it, I just assemble it. - It's not ability that we often lack, but the patience to use our ability

View ldl's profile

ldl

1135 posts in 963 days


#2 posted 512 days ago

Being from south Georgia it seldom ever gets much below freezing and don’t think I want to be knee deep in snow. Mater of fact I know I don’t want to be knee deep in snow. I feel for you though. Keep up the good werk.

-- Dewayne in Bainbridge, Ga. - - No one can make you mad. Only you decide when you get mad - -

View stefang's profile

stefang

12575 posts in 1932 days


#3 posted 512 days ago

Speaking as an Amwegian I know just how you feel about the cold weather. An insulated workshop is a must in in this part of the world if you want to do woodworking in the winter. I enjoyed seeing your fish trivets, the bird feeder and other stuff. Woodworking should be a good hobby in Finland with all those forests.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

15404 posts in 1465 days


#4 posted 512 days ago

Well, fortunately spring is on the way. Welcome to Lumberjocks.

helluvawreck aka Charles
http://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View AJM's profile

AJM

86 posts in 718 days


#5 posted 512 days ago

Thanks for the warm welcome back.. second daytime of it being in the +’s +6 on the way home from college.
In winter i like to think of the run in to the workshop run out as rustic and practical crafting.
would be interesting to see what insulated workshops are about as i have the go ahead to build one in an ex potato storage barn.

regards

Anthony

-- Englishman in Finland I am guessing that i am Finglish.

View stefang's profile

stefang

12575 posts in 1932 days


#6 posted 512 days ago

Basically you need to use insulation (ask your local builder supplier) in the walls and ceiling between the framing uprights and ceiling beams. About 10cm in the walls should be enough and thicker in the ceiling, not sure. These should be covered with thickish clear plastic (comes in rolls) and then some kind of wall panelling nailed on over it. The floor can be insulated with 5cm thick styrofoam and flooring material floated on top of it. I used impregnated tongue and groove chipboard flooring platters. Then just add a little heat and bingo you have winter working conditions. Just to give you an idea. They might do it a little differently in Finland than here.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View AJM's profile

AJM

86 posts in 718 days


#7 posted 512 days ago

Thanks Stefang. I was thinking of Chipboard walls but i had no idea how thick the insulation would be. I had not thought of raising the floor levels either.

and a final thought..
I have been out with a chainsaw and cut a few trees down today.. should i keep them in a warm store? or in an out of the weather environment?

thanks in advance

Anthony

-- Englishman in Finland I am guessing that i am Finglish.

View Jamie Speirs's profile

Jamie Speirs

4088 posts in 1455 days


#8 posted 512 days ago

Anthony, great trivets
Whittling is always an option, by the fire
My son and I had a whittling weekend recently it was great fun
Jamie

-- Who is the happiest of men? He who values the merits of others, and in their pleasure takes joy, even as though 'twere his own. --Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

View AJM's profile

AJM

86 posts in 718 days


#9 posted 512 days ago

Thanks Jamie.
I have been looking in to making some lapland hand crafts. I would like to try whittling but my wife would probably kill me if i did that indoors.
I think the warm workshop will save my sanity in winter.. although my wife has stipulated a can not have list for it.
so far I can not have.. a coffee machine, microwave, bed or a bathroom.
I dare not mention my counter argument of having a kettle and oven and a rocking chair :)
Anthony

-- Englishman in Finland I am guessing that i am Finglish.

View Jamie Speirs's profile

Jamie Speirs

4088 posts in 1455 days


#10 posted 512 days ago

Anthony my wife came home and my DIL was knitting me lad and myself were
knee deep in shavings and 4 dogs playing amid all this in the living room
Her comment, you lot are having fun. :)

jamie

-- Who is the happiest of men? He who values the merits of others, and in their pleasure takes joy, even as though 'twere his own. --Johann Wolfgang von Goethe

View stefang's profile

stefang

12575 posts in 1932 days


#11 posted 511 days ago

What do you plan to do with them?

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View AJM's profile

AJM

86 posts in 718 days


#12 posted 511 days ago

I was planning on using some of them on a lathe and some knife hangle material.
The ends i was hoping to use for growing pea’s up instead of canes.
I am off to the forest shortly I may come home with some more knife material and some potential “plank/board” materials for making end of grain chopping boards.

tree types are. Birch – Alder – Rowan – Aspen

thanks in advance

Anthony

-- Englishman in Finland I am guessing that i am Finglish.

View stefang's profile

stefang

12575 posts in 1932 days


#13 posted 511 days ago

Logs for turning are just a well stored outdoors. You can just cut off a length when you need it. When I first started turning I cut up a Sycamore log into workpiece sizes for turning. The next morning they had all dried out and cracked. This won’t happen if you just leave it as it is. As for planks and boards, here is a good link on that:

http://www.finewoodworking.com/how-to/article/seasoned-wood-what-you-need-to-know.aspx

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View AJM's profile

AJM

86 posts in 718 days


#14 posted 511 days ago

thanks I have some alder which i can keep like that. I have split some slightly curly birch for knife handles.
will read the link for the rest thats coming
thanks Stefang

-- Englishman in Finland I am guessing that i am Finglish.

View AJM's profile

AJM

86 posts in 718 days


#15 posted 511 days ago

I need to be a member.. I am having to learn alot to. I think i wont plank any thing this year i will wait til i have built the new workshop. And free up some storage space.

-- Englishman in Finland I am guessing that i am Finglish.

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