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Recently Commissioned Walnut and Maple Edge Grain Cutting Board

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Project by Jonathan posted 02-21-2013 03:00 AM 2724 views 10 times favorited 17 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Had an old buddy from college recently contact me to commission a cutting board for his wife’s birthday. He requested that it be mostly walnut, and I added in a little maple for some nice clean contrasting lines. I tend to put feet on my cutting boards, but he did not want them, so I included a pad to put under the board to hold it in-place while in use (pictured in the first photo).

Wood Species: Walnut and Hard Maple
Dimensions: 15-1/4”x11”x1-1/8”
Weight: 4-pounds, 6-ounces
Style: Edge Grain Cutting Board, Bookmatched
Glue: Titebond III
Finish: 6-coats mineral oil, followed by Howard’s Butcher Block Conditioner which he will continue to apply after receiving the board
Sanding: Up to 220-grit
Routered: Finger holds and edges rounded over using router, then hand sanded

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."





17 comments so far

View crashman's profile

crashman

103 posts in 1065 days


#1 posted 02-21-2013 03:35 AM

Jonathan, Awesome grain matching & very nice board. I am impressed with the finger holds, would you care to share the procedure with the router?? I have seen other LJ’s do this on their boards & would like to give it a try on mine, but am worried that I will ruin a nice board???? Thanks…...........Jack

-- Jack R. Ellis

View Pete Jansen's profile

Pete Jansen

250 posts in 1641 days


#2 posted 02-21-2013 03:42 AM

Beautiful job on the board. Hows your weather?

-- Lovin' sawdust in beautiful Fort Collins, Colorado

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11678 posts in 2408 days


#3 posted 02-21-2013 04:01 AM

Very nice looking board and I like your mat idea as well : )

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1770 days


#4 posted 02-21-2013 04:44 AM

Jack, I was having issues getting this project uploaded and was trying to add a few more pictures, including one of the setup for the finger holds.

Thanks Pete! Weather isn’t bad in Denver yet. Couple inches of snow so far.

Thanks Dusty. I use this same type of mat and it works well. As a bonus, it easily rolls up and goes next to our silverware.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View stefang's profile (online now)

stefang

13528 posts in 2054 days


#5 posted 02-21-2013 09:54 AM

Looks great Jonathan.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View grenger's profile

grenger

185 posts in 2086 days


#6 posted 02-21-2013 12:53 PM

I like your boards, very nice. I also would like to know how you routed the Finger holds. What type of bit, etc.
thanks.

-- Gerry (the beginner), Gatineau, QC, Canada

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1770 days


#7 posted 02-21-2013 01:32 PM

The finger holds were made using a rabbeting bit. I then used stop blocks to get the cutouts automatically centered and to the width I desired. I’ll try to get a picture up in a bit.

Mike and Gerry, thanks!

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1770 days


#8 posted 02-21-2013 02:21 PM

Here are a couple of pictures of how I routered the finger holds for the board. The shaft was 1/2”, which I’d strongly advise using, as you have to have the bit protruding quite a ways beyond the collet nut. Router bits are most secure and stable if they are set deep into the collet, which is not what I do here. If you follow my procedure, you are doing so at your own risk, as this is not the ideal way to use a router bit and router. I went with a 1/2” bearing, so the shaft was slightly burnishing the edge of the board. I used a variable rabbeting bit that came with various bearing sizes to produce different depths of cut. For this type of application, you have to use a rabbeting bit that uses a bearing at least the width of your bit shaft, if not slightly wider. At first, I had the bit set too deeply, and when I went to lower the bit to make another pass to make the finger hold larger, I didn’t realize the collet nut had come too far down. As a result, the collet nut dug into the board a little bit. I ended up getting it fixed, but it definitely took a bit of extra time and work since I already had rounded over the top and bottom edges. I’d also advise routering your finger holds before you do anything to your edges! I got ahead of myself on that one.

In the pictures, you can see that I’ve set all this up on my table saw. The board hangs slightly over the edge so there’s clearance for the router bit, but more importantly, clearance for the clamp to hold down the spacer board along the outside edge. The spacer boards need to be the same width to automatically center your finger holds. I also used a spacer block on the outside of the board that is taller than the board itself. This ensures that the stop block next to it sits flush with the edge of the board. The other spacer block is clamped to my rip fence. They should both hang past the edge of the board so the router base has a solid, straight surface to stop at. I’d recommend hanging them several inches over the board (I went 3”), as you’ll be guiding the router in towards the board, and away from the board and you don’t want any stray gouging as the bit enters or exits the cut.

Once you get everything all set up, I’d recommend taking several lighter passes rather than hogging it out all at once, especially since you’re cutting into end grain at this point (at least, for this type of board). Once you get one full pass made, go ahead and either raise or lower the router bit a little bit to enlarge the finger holds if necessary. Once one side is done, loosen everything, turn the board 180-degrees, and repeat on the other end.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View garbonsai's profile

garbonsai

135 posts in 675 days


#9 posted 02-21-2013 02:53 PM

Nice and simple, and beautiful contrast. Great work!

-- Do not taunt Happy Fun Ball.

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1770 days


#10 posted 02-21-2013 02:57 PM

garbonsai, thank you! I think that in certain situations, sometimes less is more.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1770 days


#11 posted 02-22-2013 12:39 AM

I wanted to post a tip that I forgot to mention before, but discovered when making this board. I discovered this idea after I had already done the glue-up, so I’d do it slightly differently next time. If you use a drum sander and ever get a little snipe like I do with my Performax 16-32, then this tip may work for you too. In the picture below, the longer pieces of maple help prevent the snipe, without wasting very much wood. I would’ve made the maple longer on both sides, but discovered this tip as I was sending the board through the drum sander. Keep the strips long, send the boards through the drum sander until it’s to your liking, then simply trim the board square as you normally would.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View RogerInColorado's profile

RogerInColorado

298 posts in 674 days


#12 posted 02-22-2013 01:02 AM

Beautiful project. Nice tip on the snipe prevention (and the finger holds).

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1770 days


#13 posted 02-22-2013 01:24 AM

Thanks Roger. And I’m glad to be helpful, when I can.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1770 days


#14 posted 02-22-2013 02:12 AM

Gerry, I used this rabbeting bit from Rockler in the 1/2”-shank size to make the finger holds.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11678 posts in 2408 days


#15 posted 02-22-2013 03:33 AM

I also use the anti-snipe method , sometimes just gluing some longer scrap wood onto the sides of the real project : ) Works very well .

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

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