LumberJocks

3 more rolling pins

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Project by GenuineGeek posted 02-11-2013 12:23 AM 1005 views 2 times favorited 9 comments Add to Favorites Watch

My wife brought her rolling pin to work and so I was hired to make 3 more. They are all in the same construction technique as my previous pin earlier this year seen here: http://lumberjocks.com/projects/78356
They range from 3.5 inches in diameter to 4 inches, and are between 11 and 12 inches long.
The one in the middle I oriented on an angle and added other cutoff pieces at other various angles.
Woods used: ash, cherry, maple, walnut, oak, and another deep brown rare wood that I forget the name of,

-- Don't try to figure it out... just turn it.





9 comments so far

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sprucegum

323 posts in 663 days


#1 posted 02-13-2013 01:42 AM

Very nice I really like the middle one.what do you use for sealer on them?

-- A tube of calk and a gallon of paint will make a carpenter what he ain't

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GenuineGeek

157 posts in 647 days


#2 posted 02-13-2013 04:41 AM

I use Mineral Oil (from the pharmacy) or coconut oil, or for the middle one I tired a new to me product, a “butcher block” finish. All of those are food safe.

-- Don't try to figure it out... just turn it.

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sprucegum

323 posts in 663 days


#3 posted 02-13-2013 01:09 PM

If you want to try making one of solid stock some time you might try line boring it on your lathe, You simply put a drill chuck in the head stock and use the tailstock with a center installed to push your work into the drill. I start with a short drill and use longer drills as the hole gets deeper, You will of course have to move the tailstock a few times as you go unless yours has more throw than mine does. When I get almost thru I reverse the piece and start from the other end or you can leave the stock a little long and nip the end off to find the hole. Of course you will want to do this while the stock is still square so it can be trued to the hole and it also makes it easier to hold ( I use a clamp and a scrap of wood.) I have used this method many times to drill the thru bolt hole in Shotgun buttstocks they are almost as long as your rolling pins.

-- A tube of calk and a gallon of paint will make a carpenter what he ain't

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GenuineGeek

157 posts in 647 days


#4 posted 02-13-2013 04:55 PM

I have one of those craftsman lathes that has a pipe for a bed. It is impossible to line up the headstock and tailstock well enough to drill trough 11 or 12 inches. I have tired the method you suggest. I can have success that way if I start with a 4.5 inch thick piece of stock, but that seems like a waste as I turn them down to 3 + inches.
I really like your idea but I will need to wait till I have saved enough pennies for a better lathe, OR if I get some free larger stock, that would do it too. The price of wood up here in crazy, I put in about $20 in wood on each of those rolling pins the way it was.
I have found a cheaper vendor for wood, I am going to Calgary on Friday to see what his prices are like.

-- Don't try to figure it out... just turn it.

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GenuineGeek

157 posts in 647 days


#5 posted 02-13-2013 05:56 PM

Oh, and I have a bit more waste than the average turner because I am still learning, that also contributes to needing a larger blank to start with too. I only started this year (2013). Will get better.
I have also tried with a long bit, and it comes out way off centre on the other end.
When I do it the way suggested I usually don’t get them to meet in the middle and when I do, they meet at an angle. I
I can make it work for items 6 inches or less.
Thanks for the suggestion sprucegum.

-- Don't try to figure it out... just turn it.

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sprucegum

323 posts in 663 days


#6 posted 02-13-2013 08:56 PM

You are a pretty good wood turner if you made those rolling pins on one of those lathes. I had one got rid of it as soon as I could. Built mine out of a couple of old drill press heads I found at a scrap yard, I used ash timbers from trees I cut here at home to make the bed. It is nothing special but it gets the job done, I am not much of a wood turner anyway I use it mostly to make odds and ends I need or parts for other projects. My wife has a birds eye maple rolling pin that belonged to my great grandmother , then my grandmother, and my mother. It has been used so much the softer wood between the birds eyes is worn down. Can you imagine how many pie crusts it took to do that. My great grandmother was born in 1873. Just think you could be creating family heirlooms.

-- A tube of calk and a gallon of paint will make a carpenter what he ain't

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GenuineGeek

157 posts in 647 days


#7 posted 02-13-2013 09:05 PM

I don’t want to brag, but I did a little turning when I was in highschool and I was pretty good at it then. I do have a contraption added to this unit to force the tailstock closer to centre, but it does not work with my drill chuck. I will be getting a better lathe eventually.
Yes, I would love to make items that family will treasure for generations to come. thanks for your kind words and advice.

-- Don't try to figure it out... just turn it.

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sprucegum

323 posts in 663 days


#8 posted 02-13-2013 09:18 PM

I cheat when I need something turned that uniform. I rough it out on my wood lathe then chuck it in my south bend metal lathe set the power feed nice and slow and go make a cup of coffee when the coffee is gone all I need to do is put it back in the wood lathe and sand it. I could not make a 16” rolling pin strait across in all day on the wood lathe.

-- A tube of calk and a gallon of paint will make a carpenter what he ain't

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GenuineGeek

157 posts in 647 days


#9 posted 02-13-2013 09:20 PM

Ahh a metal lathe, sweet. My dad has one, but he lives 1500miles away. He cut a few things of wood on it. nothing to show, just pieces he needed to around the shop. I certainly won’t be getting one of those any time soon.

-- Don't try to figure it out... just turn it.

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