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Pine Chisel Handle (first lathe project)

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Project by Rick M. posted 01-11-2013 01:43 AM 1250 views 1 time favorited 5 comments Add to Favorites Watch

The handle broke off this old Stanley long ago and it has been rattling around my toolbox for a decade with a piece of dowel for a handle. A new handle seemed like a good learning project and so I chucked up a piece of 2×2 and basically copied the handles on my Marples with a couple obvious alterations. It’s a junk chisel that never gets used so I’m not worried about durability, if it does break then I’ll just turn a new one.

Sanded to 600, a coat of linseed followed by two coats of shellac then sanded again with 600. Next time I’ll try burning the lines. I don’t own a drill chuck so I clamped a 5/16” drill bit with vice grips and drilled freehand, worked well.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/





5 comments so far

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2847 posts in 992 days


#1 posted 01-11-2013 02:30 AM

Drill it in a drill press first next time (mark center and set the depth). If you are between centers with a spur and a live center, put the live center in the hole (assuming you don’t have a chuck)

You did a nice job! Pine burns easy. If you want to burn the lines, speed up the lathe and use a piece of cardboard. A lot of people use wire. I don’t really like it that much because:
A – the wire cuts
B – the wire gets pretty hot (and so do your fingers)

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

View Rick M.'s profile

Rick M.

4470 posts in 1124 days


#2 posted 01-11-2013 04:28 AM

I don’t have a drill press which is why I drilled it on the lathe. I used a screw chuck which holds rock solid. Thanks for the tip about cardboard would have never thought of trying that. I looked around for a steel wire and couldn’t find one, tried a copper wire but all I got was burnt fingers.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

View JoeinGa's profile

JoeinGa

3638 posts in 751 days


#3 posted 01-11-2013 12:29 PM

So the new lathes LIVES then? So how did the fan motor work?

OK, so now lets see some of them fancy vistorian table legs with lions feet next! LOL

Old Stanley chisel notwithstanding, the handle looks nice.

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View drbyte's profile

drbyte

587 posts in 2806 days


#4 posted 01-11-2013 02:09 PM

Nice job on the handle. Put a large wooden bead or dowel on both ends of a piece of wire about 14-16 inches long to hold it by to avoid burnt fingers. I have several sizes fixed up like this for decorative rings on bowls, flutes, and other pieces. Stainless works best.

-- Dennis, WV

View Rick M.'s profile

Rick M.

4470 posts in 1124 days


#5 posted 01-11-2013 08:00 PM

Joe, the lathe is alive but far from finished. I decided to bone up on my turning before making the pulleys plus I’m waiting on a drive spur and flat belt. My plans have been altered so that I’m going to build a jackshaft to drive the lathe which will in turn be powered by a motor. That will solve my motor angle problems plus if I ever want to switch motors it becomes very easy although I haven’t completely dismissed the idea of just raising the motor mount. Right now I’m still using the 1/3 HP motor clamped to my workbench with a V belt turned inside out. Basically I’m stalled waiting on parts and practicing my turning while ideas whirl around in my head.

-- http://thewoodknack.blogspot.com/

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