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A Little Bit of Christmas

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Project by darryl posted 08-04-2006 04:09 AM 3080 views 3 times favorited 7 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I’m working on a Thomas Moser inspired dresser for my youngest of three daughters. Daunting may be an understatement on this project. This dresser is by far my largest project to date.

To help keep my sanity, I thought it might be a good idea to step away from the dresser to work on something that from start to finish could be completed in a day or so. Flipping through a recent copy of Wood magazine helped me decide what to do.

Not having a chuck for my lathe yet wasn’t going to deter me from attempting one of these turned Christmas tree ornaments. Working in a spindle format, I was able to complete my ornament and have it actually kind of resemble the magazine’s version!

I used Cherry for the ball section and Walnut for the top and finial. I applied a BLO/wipe-on-poly mixture before spraying with a glossy poly (at my wife’s request).

For the most part, I’m happy with the results. I do need to find a way to clean up the inside of the ornament…





7 comments so far

View scottb's profile

scottb

3648 posts in 2985 days


#1 posted 08-04-2006 05:17 AM

I like the lathe… it provides some of the intant gratification the computer culture is instilling… while still allowing us to work “old school” at the same time.

The first day of the (albeit short) turning course I took last year, the instructor said not to be ashamed of using sandpaper… (for which we were all grateful). In the latest issue of Woodwork (October ?? just hit the newstand today) They showed how to do a goblet with a spiraled stem. It seems they use rasps just as much as the skew, et al… on this project. Just a thought for the interior (painting the inside might be a nice touch too.)

Anyhow, I’ve been meaning to give one of these a shot in time for Christmas. I don’t have this issue handy, but from what I remember, you hit the nail on the head. The cherry and walnut contrast nicely. I bet, with the glossy finish, this will look great on the Christmas tree.

-- I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it. - Van Gogh -- http://blanchardcreative.etsy.com -- http://snbcreative.wordpress.com/

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darryl

1792 posts in 2985 days


#2 posted 08-05-2006 05:45 AM

The magazine painted the tree and covered it in glitter. I just can’t bring myself to put paint on a perfectly good piece of walnut… I’ve used paint on Pine, no problem, but Walnut (or any hardwood for that matter) I just can’t do.

I do need to do something to clean up the inside. I’m debating getting some small rasps, since I think that might give me a little better control rather than driving a piece of sand paper in there with my finger.

my biggest fear on any project is destroying it just before it’s done!

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scottb

3648 posts in 2985 days


#3 posted 08-05-2006 06:14 AM

I hear ya. I always hope/expect everything is going to turn out great… and often stop short, seeking feedback or encouragement, lest I take things too far, and risk ruin.

Contrastingly, rather than just dip my toe into strange waters, I’ve been known to jump in and attempt more intermediate or advanced level projects (on various fronts) as an “intro/primer” than I really should. (At the risk of souring myself to all sorts of otherwise worthwhile ventures)

For example, the first ceiling I replaced in our house – I took down the failing drywall, and put up tongue and groove beadboard, on the diagnal, before I owned a power miter saw. (though this quickly gave me the excuse to run out and get one.)

-- I am always doing what I cannot do yet, in order to learn how to do it. - Van Gogh -- http://blanchardcreative.etsy.com -- http://snbcreative.wordpress.com/

View Dick, & Barb Cain's profile

Dick, & Barb Cain

8693 posts in 2958 days


#4 posted 08-23-2006 12:36 AM

Very nice, was the inside turned first, like I’ve seen by using reinforced packaging tape to hold the pieces together to turn the inside. Then taking apart & gluing, then turning the outside? I’ve been going to try this sometime.

-- -** You are never to old to set another goal or to dream a new dream ****************** Dick, & Barb Cain, Hibbing, MN. http://www.woodcarvingillustrated.com/gallery/member.php?uid=3627&protype=1

View darryl's profile

darryl

1792 posts in 2985 days


#5 posted 08-23-2006 02:19 AM

this is a two step process. the first step involves turning the tree on a cylinder. that then gets glued in the upper portion and the turning continues once that it’s dry.

I’ve read about the inside-out turning that you mentioned, but have not yet tried it.

View Rosco's profile

Rosco

15 posts in 2937 days


#6 posted 12-06-2006 11:29 PM

That’s a great photo of you. Do you ever pick any chicks up on this site?

-- Rosco

View mot's profile

mot

4911 posts in 2695 days


#7 posted 08-01-2007 05:08 PM

This just came up in “Roll the Dice,” I’m considering turning a few of these as I have that copy of Wood Magazine. It looks like you did a really nice job. Thanks for posting.

-- You can discover more about a person in an hour of play than in a year of conversation. (Plato)

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