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Trivet

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Project by rkober posted 572 days ago 3323 views 16 times favorited 8 comments Add to Favorites Watch

My son and I made a router jig for making trivets before the Holidays. This was one I made for my wife out of maple and walnut. I just started using the lacquer can spay which is wonderful finish for little projects like this. One question that I had when building is what glue to use since the interfaces are so small. I just used wood glue but wondered if CA would be better. Any advice from anyone?

-- Ray - Spokane, WA - “Most people don’t recognize opportunity because it’s usually disguised as hard work.” - Unknown





8 comments so far

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

111999 posts in 2176 days


#1 posted 572 days ago

Cool Design ,great job.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View chadgr's profile (online now)

chadgr

85 posts in 810 days


#2 posted 572 days ago

I really like the suttlel curves, and in answer to your question, I don’t think ca glue would be better because as we know tests have been done and they prove that wood glue is stronger than the wood itself. Also if you add up all of those small contact surfaces you will see that there is quite a bit of contact area.
Thanks Chad

-- Chad Griffiths Vist my Etsy Shop https://www.etsy.com/uk/shop/Everythingwood1?ref=si_shop

View Sergio's profile

Sergio

400 posts in 1291 days


#3 posted 571 days ago

Interesting design!

-- - Greetings from Brazil - --

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11638 posts in 2287 days


#4 posted 571 days ago

Beautiful design and great work by the both of you : )
Any plans on making a blog about your project ?

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1757 days


#5 posted 571 days ago

Make it in one piece to begin with. You need a pivot and a circle cutting jig that increases in regular increments. Cut one side at least 1/2 the thickness of the stock, then flip the board over and do the other side at different angle? The results are the same thing, only in one continuous piece. You can vary the design by using different cutter heads, creating square voids, ovals, and even diamonds.

I’m doing something similar for the trays of the humidor I’m building.

There’s an article in Fine Woodworking mag sometime last year that shows the technique.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View rkober's profile

rkober

125 posts in 891 days


#6 posted 571 days ago

I hadn’t planned a blog but here’s the link to the jig design that I loosely followed that’s very helpful: link

-- Ray - Spokane, WA - “Most people don’t recognize opportunity because it’s usually disguised as hard work.” - Unknown

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11638 posts in 2287 days


#7 posted 571 days ago

Thanks for the link : )

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View Jon McGrath's profile

Jon McGrath

13 posts in 1377 days


#8 posted 570 days ago

These look great, thanks for sharing, imitation is the greatest form of flattery and I will for sure be making some of these up. Thanks again. Jon

-- Jon

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