LumberJocks

Christmas Present: Walnut Cork Board

  • Advertise with us
Project by Jonathan posted 12-24-2012 02:59 PM 1145 views 3 times favorited 13 comments Add to Favorites Watch

I began this project a couple of years ago, and decided to finish it for a Christmas gift this year. This was built to fit a specific location in a family member’s house, just above her desk area, above the counter she uses as a desk and below the cabinets. I decided to take the first couple of photos on our vintage Christmas tablecloth since it’s a Christmas present.

I began by constructing the frame, using half lap joints at the 4-corners. I did not wrap the grain, but instead used 2-different pieces of walnut, ripped in half. The top and bottom of the board are one piece, while the left and right sides are another piece. Then I used the router and a chisel to add the rabbet to receive the plywood backing, which is countersunk 3/64” below the frame. I also used a roundover bit along the outside edge of the frame.

I applied 5-coats of General Finishes Arm R Seal Satin to the walnut frame before gluing in the plywood substrate. The back of the plywood received 3-coats of Arm R Seal. The frame also received several applications of Renaissance Wax before I applied the light painter’s tape to help avoid any contact cement getting on the walnut during application.

I used Titebond Post-Forming Neoprene Plus Contact Cement to adhere the corks. I’d highly recommend this contact cement for indoor use. I felt safe using this in my basement, without needing a respirator. Before gluing in the corks, I did a dry fit to make sure I had the spacing correct, as well as generating a seemingly random, yet balanced layout of the corks. Each cork was cut on the bandsaw, removing a portion of the back side to allow for a large and flat glue surface. I ended up needing 256-whole corks and 32-partial corks to fill-in the partial ends of the running bond pattern. The corks sit slightly proud of the walnut frame, allowing for any potential papers or pictures that are stuck to the board to overlap the frame, without any interference. There is a little bit of crookedness on one or two columns of corks, but overall, I’m fairly happy with the layout. I did not add any hardware to hang the board on the wall, as I thought it would be best if the recipient makes that decision.

Dimensions: 32” wide, by 20” tall, walnut frame is 2-5/16” wide
Weight: 9-pounds, 6-ounces
Wood: 4/4 Walnut for the frame @ 13/16” thick, 1/4” MDF core red oak plywood for the center substrate
Glue: Titebond III for the half lap joints and gluing the plywood into the walnut frame, Titebond Post-Forming Neoprene Plus Contact Cement to adhere the corks
Corks: 256-whole corks, 32-half corks cut to fill running bond ends, cut on bandsaw
Sanded: Up to 220-grit
Finish: 5-coats General Finishes Arm R Seal Satin, followed by several coats of Renaissance Wax

I’d like to wish all my fellow LJs a very Merry Christmas and a Happy New Year!

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."





13 comments so far

View Albe's profile

Albe

178 posts in 697 days


#1 posted 12-24-2012 05:30 PM

Nice project. I did not orginally realize it was wine bottle corks.

-- Pain is temporary, quitting last forever.

View a1Jim's profile

a1Jim

112296 posts in 2263 days


#2 posted 12-24-2012 06:04 PM

Very cool I like it.

-- http://artisticwoodstudio.com Custom furniture

View MisterBill's profile

MisterBill

337 posts in 937 days


#3 posted 12-24-2012 06:50 PM

Looks like it was a labor or love!

View Grumpymike's profile

Grumpymike

1109 posts in 1001 days


#4 posted 12-24-2012 06:58 PM

WOW it must have been fun drinking all that wine to collect all of thoes corks … 256 by yourself and shared 32 to get the half corks …
This is a great project and well crafted, I really like it. But, is it a wall hanging to be admired or is it a trivet type of thing to be used.

-- Grumpy old guy, and lookin' good Doin' it. ... Surprise Az.

View Northwest29's profile

Northwest29

787 posts in 1176 days


#5 posted 12-24-2012 08:24 PM

Wow, that is a lot of corks for sure. Did you use a jig of any sort to cut all those corks on the bandsaw so you cold maintain a consistant thickness, or all by eye?

-- Ron, Eugene, OR, "Curiosity is a terrible thing to waste."

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1736 days


#6 posted 12-24-2012 09:08 PM

Grumpymike, I actually didn’t drink all of the bottles for these corks. It is meant to be hung on the wall, to hold notes, pictures, etc. using push pins.

Ron, I cut them on the bandsaw using the fence to get a nice flat side for the glueup. I did not worry about thickness on these corks since different elevations between the corks aren’t critical for this type of application, with the varied thicknesses actually adding a bit of visual interest and randomness to the piece. I made a small trivet, cutting those corks on the bandsaw as well, but did make sure all those corks were the same thickness so that the pot or serving dish had a nice even surface to land on.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View Schwieb's profile

Schwieb

1534 posts in 2147 days


#7 posted 12-25-2012 01:36 AM

Nice! I’ve been wanting to do something like this to showcase corks we’ve save for many years. Nice work

-- Dr. Ken, Florida - Durch harte arbeit werden Träume wahr.

View stefang's profile

stefang

13251 posts in 2020 days


#8 posted 12-25-2012 02:01 AM

Very attractive and well done project Jonathan.

-- Mike, an American living in Norway.

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1736 days


#9 posted 12-25-2012 05:47 AM

I appreciate all the positive comments. I haven’t been able to spend very much time in the shop for quite a while now, but hope to spend more time exploring my creative side, as well as continuing to learn both technique and skill in the near future.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View jack1's profile

jack1

1939 posts in 2713 days


#10 posted 12-25-2012 09:29 PM

Nice.

-- jack -- ...measure once, curse twice!

View Kaa162's profile

Kaa162

72 posts in 336 days


#11 posted 12-18-2013 04:12 PM

Pretty cool project!

-- Blessed to have a wife who supports my addiction...Hobbies!

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1736 days


#12 posted 12-18-2013 04:13 PM

Thank you Kaa162!

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

View Jonathan's profile

Jonathan

2605 posts in 1736 days


#13 posted 12-18-2013 04:17 PM

Kaa162, This ended up finding a new home in your neck of the woods. It now resides a bit NW of Philadelphia.

-- Jonathan, Denver, CO "Constructive criticism is welcome and valued as it gives me new perspectives and helps me to advance as a woodworker."

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase