LumberJocks

Crosscut Sled - Supersled style

  • Advertise with us
Project by Class1E posted 11-29-2012 02:32 AM 2890 views 8 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This is my new crosscut sled. I used it a little bit building my cutting board project; I’m loving it so far. It is 3/4” melamine with an MDF / hardboard sandwich main fence and pine front fence. The main fence was built in two parts that are bolted together with shims to ensure the front face is straight. There is also a T-slot cut in the front of the fence. I cut the wide groove for another T-slot in the top of the fence, but i haven’t added the hardboard cover with the narrow groove; I’m not sure I will need it. The entire fence assembly is bolted to the sled panel. I squared the fence using the 5-cut method; it is within <0.001 in over a 14 in length – pretty darn good! The runners are UHMW cut to fit the table saw miter slots exactly.
Now to build some accessories:
Bevel cut jig
Miter fences
Spline jig

-- Brady





11 comments so far

View woodshaver's profile

woodshaver

2878 posts in 2099 days


#1 posted 11-29-2012 02:40 AM

Wow! That’s one heck of a nice sled!

-- Tony C St Augustine FL, My high school shop teacher said "You can do it"... Now I can't stop!

View whitebeast88's profile

whitebeast88

3600 posts in 937 days


#2 posted 11-29-2012 09:56 PM

that’s a great sled.well done.

-- Marty.Athens,AL

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

14541 posts in 1421 days


#3 posted 11-29-2012 11:03 PM

A fine sled indeed.

Could you provide a little more detail (& pictures) of the fence details?
What is the maximum width board you can cut?

Thanks for sharing this, I URGENTLY NEED to make a crosscut sled!!!

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

View NormG's profile

NormG

4510 posts in 1750 days


#4 posted 11-30-2012 02:10 AM

Now, that is most definitely a wonderful sled.

Great job and the tolerance so close, wonderful also

-- Norman

View doordude's profile

doordude

1085 posts in 1729 days


#5 posted 11-30-2012 02:47 AM

looks heavy duty, nice job

View Class1E's profile

Class1E

20 posts in 806 days


#6 posted 11-30-2012 02:59 AM

Randy,
Absolutely, the sled is 18 in on either side of the blade. The fence extends another ~6 in beyond that on the left side. I’m also planning to build a stop block that can extend beyond the edge of the fence by using the t-slot. In theory, it should be able to handle anything under 36 in, double the distance to the edge of the sled from the cut, just so the piece doesn’t try to tip and pinch the blade as it is being cut.
I built the front face of the fence from two layers of 1\2 in MDF and one layer of 1\4 in hardboard. I glued the two layers of MDF together first and cut a 1\2 in groove to accept the head of a toilet bolt (cheap t-bolt.
The rear portion of the fence is also made of two layers of MDF and sits on top of a horizontal piece of MDF to allow it to be attached to the melamine. There is another groove in the top of the rear half of the fence to allow use of t-bolts there too if I decide I need that. I clamped both halves of the fence together at this point and drilled holes for the bolts and countersunk the front half for the bolt heads. I used connector bolts, so it wasn’t a very deep countersink and I could just use a forstner bit for a flat bottom. With the bolts installed, I glued the hardboard skin onto the front face of the fence. Then I just bolted the two halves together and used masking tape to shim the face straight.
I’ll get more pics of the fence up tomorrow.
I hope this helps; let me know if you need to know anything else.

-- Brady

View Class1E's profile

Class1E

20 posts in 806 days


#7 posted 11-30-2012 09:35 PM

I have added some photos detailing the fence design below:

This picture shows the kerf cut through the front of the fence with the blade at maximum height, about 2.25 in of depth capacity when using the sled. The T-slot is above the maximum level of the cut.

This picture shows the saw kerf cut through the rear of the fence and the bolts that hold the two halves of the fence together and the bolts that secure the fence to the sled. One thing I would do differently is to not make the two sets of bolts line up since the first set obstructs access to the second set with a ratchet. A wrench still works fine, but it is less convenient.

This picture shows a top view of the fence showing the different layers and the groove in the top. A little bit of the blue masking tape used to shim the front half of the fence is visible.

This picture shows a side view of the fence with the different layers and the T-slot. Again, the blue masking tape used to shim the front half of the fence is visible as a thin layer of blue between the two fence halves. The bolts holding the two halves together are in a line below the T-slot and embedded behind the hardboard.

-- Brady

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

14541 posts in 1421 days


#8 posted 11-30-2012 11:49 PM

Good pictures. Thanks for taking the time to provide & explain them!

A few Q’s;
Did you create a hex shaped recess for the bolt heads? a round one?
Did you epoxy the bolts in place?
Is the hardboard permenantly attached, to the front half of the fence?

Again, thanks for taking the time to document this build.

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

View Class1E's profile

Class1E

20 posts in 806 days


#9 posted 12-01-2012 01:49 AM

The recesses are round. I used connector bolts, which have thin round heads (see pic here).
I was actually going to epoxy the bolts, but I forgot to do that. The hardboard is glued on, so I couldn’t access the bolts. I got lucky and none of them spun when I tightened the nuts.

-- Brady

View DIYaholic's profile

DIYaholic

14541 posts in 1421 days


#10 posted 12-01-2012 01:58 AM

Thanks for the info!!!

I’m about to embark on a sled build and need as much info as I can stuff inside my tiny cramped brain. The only problem is that for any new data I shove in there ends up pushing some other valuable information out!!!

-- Randy-- I may not be good...but I am slow! If good things come to those who wait.... Why is procrastination a bad thing?

View HorizontalMike's profile

HorizontalMike

6968 posts in 1660 days


#11 posted 12-02-2012 01:12 PM

Very nice! You will love this thing and what it does for accuracy. Welcome to the club!

-- HorizontalMike -- "Woodpeckers understand..."

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase