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Oak speaker cabinets

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Project by Tag84 posted 11-19-2012 03:46 PM 2645 views 8 times favorited 24 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This was an enjoyable project, I wanted to try to make small cabinets this time.
To practise/experiment finishing and use my new tablesaw the bosch gts 10xc i choose real wood instead of the
usual plywood for speaker cabinets. The woofer/mid range speaker comes from a b&w center speaker box someone gave me. The tweeter is from dayton audio and is new. I transferd the filter, damping material and the speaker cable plugs from another speaker cabinet to this one.
They are 45 degrees cut on every side, wich was despite all parts theoraticaly would fit perfect (i thought)
with all the glue on all corners and working of the wood pretty tricky.
Underneath i used chrome door knobs.
The measurements ; height 12,4 inch width 9,4 inch depth 9,1 inch
Finished with 1 coat of teak oil then i switched to 2x danish oil (experimenting)
and finally bee wax.

thank you for watching.

-- -Thomas -





24 comments so far

View Ken90712's profile

Ken90712

14947 posts in 1846 days


#1 posted 11-19-2012 04:16 PM

Nice work very clean looking and I’ll bet they sound great…. Well done.

-- Ken, "Everyday above ground is a good day!"

View Fishinbo's profile

Fishinbo

11236 posts in 833 days


#2 posted 11-19-2012 04:56 PM

Definitely, a looker!

—www.sawblade.com—

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

5020 posts in 1500 days


#3 posted 11-19-2012 05:21 PM

Thomas,

Looks like you are moving up! Box joinery is not as simple as we think.LOL As Charles Neil says ‘Measure three times and sneek up on it!” LOL.

Are you copying a pattern, or designing your own cabinet? There are issues when you are really an audiophile. I use to be. LOL! A number of good books on speaker cabinet design.

I remember designing and building a boom box with a 12 inch speaker for the base. Played rock and roll for my friends in the nieghborhood. The neighbors tolerated me. LOL

Now the big booms irritate my ears. :-) There may be a market for custom speaker design for custom installations.

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View Tag84's profile

Tag84

573 posts in 1314 days


#4 posted 11-19-2012 08:40 PM

thanks everyone!
Ken they do sound quite well for their size, im happy with that :)
Doc, yes its defenitely harder then it looks,
I dont like copying, and try always to make own designs.
But i think this one has been done before :)
I’m not sure if i ever will become audiophile, The interest is there, but i want to do other things too then only focus on audio and speakerbuilding.
So funny reading your story, was this during the 60’s 70’s?

-- -Thomas -

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

5020 posts in 1500 days


#5 posted 11-20-2012 12:08 AM

How could ya tell? LOL!

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1816 days


#6 posted 11-20-2012 01:01 AM

Nice project!

All hard wood? You glued everything? You might have a problem.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View harry1's profile

harry1

512 posts in 942 days


#7 posted 11-20-2012 02:38 AM

Thomas, the woodwork does you great credit, mitres all round is not easy BUT, speaker system design is a complex subject, not just a case of putting any old drivers and crossover into a convenient size box! The size and type of enclosure is dependent upon the resonant frequency of the woofer and the crossover, which can be as simple as a capacitor who’s value is calculated so that it’s reactance enables the tweeter to take over from the mid range/woofer as smoothly as possible, to more complex filters containing inductors and capacitors.
I must add that in my days as an audio technician specialising in the esoteric end of the Hi-Fi industry, I claimed that probably 90% of the public would, after just a few hours living with a system, be completely happy whether the system cost was $250.00 or $2500.00! Possibly these days the younger generation may have more educated ears! Finally, over many years when people described what their systems consisted of then asked what MY opinion was I had a stock answer. I would ask if the person was happy with the system and the usual answer was “yes”, I would then say something like ” you have spent the money and you are happy, so what has my or anyone elses opinion got to do with it, go home and enjoy your music and stop listening for faults!”

-- Harry, Western Australia

View harry1's profile

harry1

512 posts in 942 days


#8 posted 11-20-2012 02:51 AM

Jay, providing Thomas used a quality glue, I use the Canadian made WELDBOND, the joints will be stronger than the wood. This shot taken a couple of days ago shows a piece of hard wood glued to a piece of ply. Les than an hour later I realised that a spacer should have been between the two, so I tried as hard as I could to separate them but couldn’t so I placed the hard wood into the vice and it took several HARD blows with a mallet to separate them. See how a piece of the hard wood has broken away and the slivers of plywood all over the hard wood and this after less than one hour!

-- Harry, Western Australia

View vonhagen's profile

vonhagen

483 posts in 1022 days


#9 posted 11-20-2012 02:54 AM

i wish i could hear them on my accuphase e206. they look fantastic

-- no matter what size job big or small do a job right or don't do it at all.

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

5020 posts in 1500 days


#10 posted 11-20-2012 03:01 AM

harry1,

That’s why I suggested he explore some books re: making cabinets. These are an improvement over the last speakers he built. there are many calculations, baffel design, and speaker types. I think you are right about the accomidation part to the relative sound, but there are some interesting challenges in designing a better system

:-)

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View RussellAP's profile

RussellAP

2951 posts in 944 days


#11 posted 11-20-2012 01:17 PM

Beautiful cabinets.
As an old speaker builder myself, I might suggest if those speakers seem a bit boomy on the bass is to cut down the inside sq ft area a bit. The woofers aren’t the type for ports (a tuned hole in the back or bottom of the box) which would let out the back pressure created by the woofer. That woofer is designed to have a sealed box with a specific amount of area inside in order to produce it’s best sound. Give it too much area inside the cabinet and it drowns the speaker and damps the movement under a specific Hz level and accentuates other frequencies which then boom out of it constantly. Long fiber batting is what is needed if that is the case.

Happy listening.

-- A positive attitude will take you much further than positive thinking ever will.

View Tag84's profile

Tag84

573 posts in 1314 days


#12 posted 11-20-2012 01:27 PM

thanks again.
You are right harry, it is alot of physics making a good speaker cabinet.
Good to read you were involved too in audio, like doc.
I’m just learning about this huge subject. And build the few i build so far more on feeling and what sort of
design i like. And it’s a strange matter,That 1 set sounds great to one person but the other person might not like the sound. Doc i will look for some books, thats a good idea :)
Cosmic i l glued both sides of the endgrain parts, first putting 1 layer on with my fingers pressing it in the grain to get a good base for another layer put on. There’s also a frame on both sides wich i used to get the parts together and extra strength. Future will tell if it cracks/ lets go, hopefully not :)

-- -Thomas -

View Tag84's profile

Tag84

573 posts in 1314 days


#13 posted 11-20-2012 01:32 PM

Many thanks Russel! good info.
This is where The woofers came from;

-- -Thomas -

View Cosmicsniper's profile

Cosmicsniper

2199 posts in 1816 days


#14 posted 11-20-2012 03:13 PM

When you make a cube out of solid wood, two of the six sides will be oriented cross grained to the other four sides. Those two sides will expand and contract with seasonal changes in relative humidity. The strength of the glue is what causes the problems…there is no room for the wood to move and it will buckle or cup…or split the wood.

The usual solution is to make those two cross grained panels out of plywood, which is dimensionally stable, and cover it with a veneer of the wood used on the rest of the project.

I’m not saying you will have a problem, but as beautiful as these boxes are, it’d be a shame if this happens.

-- jay, www.allaboutastro.com

View CiscoKid's profile

CiscoKid

317 posts in 1531 days


#15 posted 11-20-2012 03:15 PM

Must agree with the comments regarding proper enclosure design. I currently have all the pieces to build a pair of Seas Thor transmission line towers. For roughly $1,700 they sent me four Seas W18E-001 woofers and a pair of Seas T25CF-002 tweeters, two sets of crossovers, about 60 pounds of Blackhole sound deadener, and a set of plans for the enclosures. The transmission line tower was designed by Dr. Joseph D’Appolito, who is world-renowned for his pioneering work on MTM-based loudspeaker configurations. The only problem I am having is finding the 1” MDF required by the plans. I can get 3/4” MDF all day long, but the plans are specific regarding the use of 1”. Anyone know where I can find this stuff?

-- Al, Culpeper VA

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