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Pine dovetailed box #3

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Project by vakman posted 11-09-2012 03:44 PM 2046 views 2 times favorited 17 comments Add to Favorites Watch

The house I live in has a carriage house behind it. The previous owner left a bunch of rusting cans of stain and finish there, which I commandeered. There were damaged and odd sized containers though, which aren’t good for saving space. Twelve glass bottles solved the problem, but they needed a new home.

The rabbeted, glued and stapled bottom is cut from a piece of wall paneling, sides are 1×8 pine, and handles are scrap molding. All hand-cut. Finish is one layer tung oil, then wax.

The bottles are 6-3/4” tall, so there’s a comfortable 1/4” of clearance between the bottle tops and the edge of the box. It holds 12 pint bottles, a can of paste wax and some small square rags.

The use of bottles seems much more convenient than cans; the finish can be poured with no mess, you need one less tool around to open it, and there are less fumes while working with the open container. Also, when the apocalypse comes, I’ll have all the fixin’s for 12 Molotov cocktails in one box.

-- - Power is not revealed by striking hard or often, but by striking true. -





17 comments so far

View Smitty_Cabinetshop's profile

Smitty_Cabinetshop

10216 posts in 1341 days


#1 posted 11-09-2012 03:52 PM

Well done, vak. Bottle storage does make sense, and your simple solution to storing them is spot-on!

-- Don't anthropomorphize your handplanes. They hate it when you do that. -- OldTools Archive

View vakman's profile

vakman

301 posts in 1126 days


#2 posted 11-09-2012 04:04 PM

Thanks!

-- - Power is not revealed by striking hard or often, but by striking true. -

View Eric in central Florida's profile

Eric in central Florida

3665 posts in 2298 days


#3 posted 11-09-2012 04:23 PM

Picturing stained, and polyurethaned zombies is interesting…lol

I like your box, and the use of the old molding for handles is smart.

-- All glory comes from daring to begin.

View jacob34's profile

jacob34

464 posts in 987 days


#4 posted 11-09-2012 04:43 PM

I like the box but you couple it with the bottles and they are a match. Kinda reminds me of old western movies with the cowboys carrying nitro, only needs the straw covering the top

-- so a bear and a rabbit are sitting on a log

View TexCoats's profile

TexCoats

21 posts in 2021 days


#5 posted 11-09-2012 04:47 PM

The Nitro had straw all around as padding and a way to help keep it cool, but yes, I understand what you say! It is a great box.

-- A strange game. The only winning move is not to play -- Joshua in War Games

View Budmon's profile

Budmon

27 posts in 754 days


#6 posted 11-09-2012 05:36 PM

Great storage idea

-- Bud, North Carolina

View ChrisJ's profile

ChrisJ

55 posts in 1542 days


#7 posted 11-09-2012 07:00 PM

This is really good looking. I’ve been working on my dovetails lately and have found that pine is not the easiest material with which to practice. Your pine dovetails look great…any tips?

View vakman's profile

vakman

301 posts in 1126 days


#8 posted 11-09-2012 07:41 PM

I see what you mean about the nitro (and concur!)

ChrisJ, my main advice is to make sure your tools are really sharp! Before I start a dovetail project is usually when I motivate myself to sharpen all of my planes and chisels, so that I can get it done right. I currently am using a coping saw with a rough cut blade, and a $15 gent’s saw from Ace hardware; not the best tools. I suggest using a fine coping saw blade, and a good dovetail saw (which I’ve never used before regrettably). I also cut my pins about 1/16” proud and my tails about 1/32” proud, then plane off the excess. I do all my work in my small bedroom so I avoid sanding as much as possible. I used to fill any gaps with sawdust and glue, but find that it creates a very unattractive color when it picks up an oil finish; now I rely on wax to fill the gaps, with much better results I think.

I’d love to get my hands on some denser woods with tighter grain, such as walnut, because you’re correct that pine is difficult to work with.

-- - Power is not revealed by striking hard or often, but by striking true. -

View vakman's profile

vakman

301 posts in 1126 days


#9 posted 11-09-2012 07:45 PM

@Woodwrecker: Yes indeed! The Watcoing Dead! Zombies’ belly’s B.L.O.ted with human stains. And other tung in cheek stuff. :)

-- - Power is not revealed by striking hard or often, but by striking true. -

View hgk's profile

hgk

2 posts in 837 days


#10 posted 11-09-2012 08:42 PM

Very very nice project, now where can I get some of those dark bottles???

View TexasJim's profile

TexasJim

86 posts in 1959 days


#11 posted 11-09-2012 10:27 PM

Great looking box and nice storage. You probably need to try the finishes on some scrap wood; they may have exceedd their shelf life.

-- If the world was a logical place, men would be the ones who ride horses sidesaddle.

View ChrisJ's profile

ChrisJ

55 posts in 1542 days


#12 posted 11-10-2012 02:29 AM

Thanks for the tips, I’ll give them a shot. I have also noticed that sawdust & glue tends to have a weird color…I’ll have to try wax next.

View chopnhack's profile

chopnhack

368 posts in 1117 days


#13 posted 11-10-2012 02:50 AM

Nicely done! I like pine for simple projects, and your dovetails came out looking really clean as well as the smooth planing of the sides leaving a crisp look. :-)

-- Sneaking up on the line....

View vakman's profile

vakman

301 posts in 1126 days


#14 posted 11-10-2012 02:54 AM

Sure thing. I like using Johnson’s paste wax, or this stuff called Sno-Seal, a similar formula intended for use on leather.

@HGK: The bottles can be found from a number of suppliers (including Amazon.com), search for “Boston round 16oz” . Brown or “amber” bottles are about 70-80% of the cost of clear bottles. I would have preferred clear but given the cost as well as presumably a lower recycled glass content, I thought brown was the choice to go with.

@TexasJim: Yes, some of the stains had seperated a bit, so I had to stir them thoroughly. Ill probably add turps (for which I now have a dedicated bottle) to them upon use. The carriage house is derelict with many leaks, so the rusting cans were primarily due to moisture rather than age, however there are large temp. ranges in Boston that could have played a part damaging the finishes. A good thought, thanks.

-- - Power is not revealed by striking hard or often, but by striking true. -

View mafe's profile

mafe

9621 posts in 1812 days


#15 posted 11-10-2012 10:48 AM

Really nice box and work on those tails.
I love simple pine boxes.
Will these visible stamples not destry the shelfs…
Nice pibe.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

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