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Longworth Chuck

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Project by TheDane posted 10-18-2012 06:19 PM 3634 views 20 times favorited 16 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Here’s my Longworth Chuck, based on Garrett Lambert’s article the April, 2007 edition of Popular Woodworking magazine.

I bought a 2” faceplate ($12 from PSI) that is mounted to the back (screws and epoxy) ... the rubber ‘jaws’ are actually #2 bottle stoppers that I ordered online via Amazon.com. The bolts, washers, and wing-nuts (not shown) all came from a local hardware.

—Gerry

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"





16 comments so far

View Derek Oliver's profile

Derek Oliver

55 posts in 903 days


#1 posted 10-18-2012 07:54 PM

Great job.

View Bricofleur's profile

Bricofleur

1197 posts in 1945 days


#2 posted 10-18-2012 08:30 PM

Great job, Gerry. Sooner or later I’ll make my own. Thanks for sharing (and pushing!). :-)

Best,

Serge

http://atelierdubricoleur.wordpress.com

-- Learn from yesterday, work today and enjoy success tomorrow. -- http://atelierdubricoleur.wordpress.com

View samiam2's profile

samiam2

1 post in 839 days


#3 posted 10-18-2012 09:45 PM

Gerry, nice job, could you share the steps taken to center the bowl for finishing?..thanks..samiam2

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

3991 posts in 2415 days


#4 posted 10-18-2012 10:06 PM

samiam2—It self-centers … you just have to be careful to tighten bolts equally as the rubber compresses as you tighten. If you get a little off one way or the other, you can adjust my loosening/re-tightening bolts. Ron Brown (coolhammerman) has a YouTube video that describes how to do this.

The key to making these things so they center properly is to route the arcs consistently. To do that, I drilled (tiny) registration holes for the leg on my compass, made a jig that replaces the base plate on one of my plunge routers, and used the registration holes as pivot points while I routed.

—Gerry

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

3991 posts in 2415 days


#5 posted 10-18-2012 10:09 PM

Serge—Once I figured out how to do the initial layout of the arcs, it went pretty quickly … about 3 hours, I think.

—Gerry

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View grfrazee's profile

grfrazee

346 posts in 892 days


#6 posted 10-19-2012 12:09 AM

What size bolts did you use? I made the mistake of using #8 machine bolts on mine and they bent all to hell the first time my gouge caught. Version 2.0 will have 1.4”, I think.

-- -=Pride is not a sin=-

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

3991 posts in 2415 days


#7 posted 10-19-2012 12:39 AM

grfrazee—I used 1/4” x 20 hex bolts.

—Gerry

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View Milo's profile

Milo

862 posts in 2071 days


#8 posted 10-19-2012 12:01 PM

Seems to me you should be able to use some kind of spring system on the opposite side of the chuck to help with the centering process. hmmm. Better minds than mine should know what I mean, and be able to make it work….

-- Beer, Beer, Thank God for Beer. It's my way of keeping my mind fresh and clear...

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

3991 posts in 2415 days


#9 posted 10-19-2012 01:45 PM

Milo—Longworth’s design is really pretty easy and pretty much fool-proof … no need for springs, brackets, etc.

—Gerry

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View Bluepine38's profile

Bluepine38

2954 posts in 1837 days


#10 posted 10-19-2012 01:58 PM

Very nice looking Longworth chuck, and you get the satisfaction of using a great tool that you made yourself
every time you turn something with it. Thank you for sharing.

-- As ever, Gus-the 76 yr young apprentice carpenter

View Rj's profile

Rj

1047 posts in 2383 days


#11 posted 10-19-2012 04:08 PM

Great Job Gerry thks for posting it

-- Rj's Woodworks,San Jose & Weed Ca,

View Diggerjacks's profile

Diggerjacks

1785 posts in 1891 days


#12 posted 10-19-2012 05:24 PM

Hello The dane

I must make one like your

A nice jig and a lot of possibilities for the lathe (and the future !!!!)
How many time did you need to make it ?

Thanks for sharing

-- Diggerjack-France ---The only limit is the limit of the mind and the mind has no limit

View Darell's profile

Darell

421 posts in 2346 days


#13 posted 10-20-2012 03:31 PM

I made mine about a year ago from plans in “Fixtures and Chucks for Woodturning” by Doc Green. His plans detailed how to lay out the arcs. It helps if your material is flat. Turns out mine had a slight bow to it that I didn’t catch so it wobbles a bit. Hoping to get together with a guy in our woodturning club and make a couple with better materials. The Longworth does come in handy when finishing bowl bottoms. Great job on yours.

-- Darell, Norman, Ok.

View TheDane's profile

TheDane

3991 posts in 2415 days


#14 posted 10-20-2012 06:11 PM

Darell—My first thought was to make mine out of phenolic-faced baltic birch … then I checked the prices of that stuff and decided to go with garden variety birch plywood! Mine seems to run pretty true … haven’t checked for run-out, but there’s no detectable wobble.

—Gerry

-- Gerry -- "I don't plan to ever really grow up ... I'm just going to learn how to act in public!"

View Tim Scoville's profile

Tim Scoville

97 posts in 2087 days


#15 posted 03-11-2013 07:24 PM

Nice. I made one for a training shop in Cambodia, but still haven’t made one for me…

The quality of the plywood there was so bad, I faced both pieces with thin formica and it worked pretty well.

The bottle stoppers needed to be drilled out? How did you hold them and keep from having the drill grab the rubber during cutting?

I’m also a Packer fan, especially while waiting for the Seahawks develop into a great team.

-- Tim S, WA

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