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Walnut Handled Scratch Awl from Scratch

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Project by TrBlu posted 10-01-2012 12:10 PM 1783 views 4 times favorited 12 comments Add to Favorites Watch

While I was picking up a few tools at an estate sale, this weekend, I bought a bundle of drill rods. (The estate belonged to a retired machinest.) Since I had a lazy Saturday afternoon planned, I decided to try my hand at making a scratch all from scratch.

Sharpened the drill rod, using my drill and belt sander. The heated with a MAP torch to harden the steel. Polished back to bright finish, using 800 – 1500 sand paper.

The handle is turned from a scrap piece of Walnut from my wood pile. Brass ferrule is a 3/8” plumbing flare nut. I turned a step tennon on the handle then used the flare nut to cut thread in the tennon. A little CA glue on the freshly cut thread to secure the nut, then turned the corners off the flare nut to shape the ferrule.

I like to date my projects by inlaying a penny for the current year. On most pieces the penny is hidden in an out of the way place. With tools, I build, it is more pronounced. That way every tool I make is at least worth $0.01.

Thanks for looking.

-- The more I work with wood the more I recognize only God can make something as beautiful as a tree. I hope my humble attempts at this craft do justice by His masterpiece. -- Tim





12 comments so far

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2847 posts in 993 days


#1 posted 10-01-2012 12:59 PM

I love this. The penny idea is great. I’d love to know how you cut the recess for the linlay. On the lathe?

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

View TrBlu's profile

TrBlu

363 posts in 1371 days


#2 posted 10-01-2012 01:10 PM

A penny is 3/4” diameter. I used a 3/4” Forestner bit to drill a shallow recess for the coins. I have done it on the lathe. This one I took to the dril press. Used my centering vice to clamp on the ferrule while drilling. The recess is just under 1 mm deep, so it does not take long either way.

-- The more I work with wood the more I recognize only God can make something as beautiful as a tree. I hope my humble attempts at this craft do justice by His masterpiece. -- Tim

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2847 posts in 993 days


#3 posted 10-01-2012 01:14 PM

I take it a couple drops of CA glue locks it in place enough to survive some mallet strikes? What a great idea. I’ve been wanting to make some tools for a long time. This one is really nice

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

View TrBlu's profile

TrBlu

363 posts in 1371 days


#4 posted 10-01-2012 02:13 PM

This awl is not intended to see any mallet strikes. So, CA would hold fine.

For higher impact areas, I use 5-minute epoxy. I used epoxy to fix the shaft in the handle, so I had a small drop for the penny.

Rough up the down side of the penny with some 150 grit sand paper for better adhession.

-- The more I work with wood the more I recognize only God can make something as beautiful as a tree. I hope my humble attempts at this craft do justice by His masterpiece. -- Tim

View BinghamtonEd's profile

BinghamtonEd

1587 posts in 1114 days


#5 posted 10-01-2012 03:11 PM

Nice looking awl. What was the finish used?

-- - The mightiest oak in the forest is just a little nut that held its ground.

View TrBlu's profile

TrBlu

363 posts in 1371 days


#6 posted 10-01-2012 03:37 PM

Finish is Danish Oil, burnished in on the lathe.

-- The more I work with wood the more I recognize only God can make something as beautiful as a tree. I hope my humble attempts at this craft do justice by His masterpiece. -- Tim

View Jay's profile

Jay

2 posts in 808 days


#7 posted 10-01-2012 04:27 PM

What did you use to turn the corners off the flare nut? The lathe and wood turning chisels?

View TrBlu's profile

TrBlu

363 posts in 1371 days


#8 posted 10-01-2012 05:05 PM

Brass is soft enough to turn using wood turning tools. I have an old set of tool I use specifically for brass and aluminum. I over gound the angle on the tools to get a little less “bite” in the metal. I used a round nose scraper with a light touch to remove the corners.

Ihave used a file, on the lathe, to remove corners. With the small nut, a file is too wide and can damage the wood or the tail stock.

-- The more I work with wood the more I recognize only God can make something as beautiful as a tree. I hope my humble attempts at this craft do justice by His masterpiece. -- Tim

View MonteCristo's profile

MonteCristo

2098 posts in 933 days


#9 posted 10-01-2012 05:15 PM

A creative and useful endevour ! It’s great to be able to make useful (and good looking) things for yourself . . .

-- Dwight - "Free legal advice available - contact Dewey, Cheetam & Howe""

View grfrazee's profile

grfrazee

344 posts in 884 days


#10 posted 10-01-2012 07:31 PM

I’ve been wanting to make one of these but didn’t know what to use for the awl itself. Looks like I’ll have to find some drill rod…and by find, I mean buy.

Love the penny idea, by the way. I usually just ink it with a fine-tipped Sharpie. And the brass flare nut is good too – I usually use copper pipe cutoffs. I’ll have to give that a try as well.

-- -=Pride is not a sin=-

View Roger Clark aka Rex's profile

Roger Clark aka Rex

6940 posts in 2180 days


#11 posted 10-02-2012 01:28 PM

Really nice Don, love the 1p idea, it’s a nice touch.
Given me an idea of what I can do with my old 1d, farthings, tanners and 3d bits.

-- Roger-R, Republic of Texas. "Always look on the Bright Side of Life" - An eyeball to eyeball confrontation with a blind person is as complete waste of Time.

View Roz's profile

Roz

1661 posts in 2531 days


#12 posted 11-11-2012 09:30 PM

Almost to nice to use. Well done.

-- Terry Roswell, L.A. (Lower Alabama) "Life is what happens to you when you are making other plans."

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