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Dining Room Trim Work Design

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Project by Mark posted 674 days ago 1722 views 4 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Have had a dining room trim work design project on tap for quite a while now, and I finally just got into the heart of it. I really love shadow boxes, and while I’ve done several in my home (some on stairs which were really tricky with the angle-cuts), and I thought I’d try to take things to an even more comprehensive level this time.

My design includes fluted casings, crown moldings, chair rail – and two sets of shadow boxes: one high and another low. When complete, I’m also going to try to do a faux finish within the shadow boxes (have never attempted that before), and I’ll finish everything else in a high-end semigloss. I think I’ll even then finish the room off with a hardwood floor.

It’s coming along nicely now – but still has a way to go. You can see some of the progress in the attached pictures, and there are more photos (and even a design video I shot a couple of days ago) on my website if anyone wants to see more on this at the following link:

http://www.all-about-the-house.com/trim-work-design-tips-from-casing-to-crown-molding/

I genuinely love the look of trim work – all of it. Plus, I find there’s something particularly gratifying about doing this type of work. You can be incredibly precise, completely creative – and still have all the fun of using some great power tools. I definitely love my nail gun… ;-)

Even though this isn’t finished – the room was nothing more than an empty box before. And I’m planning to do some nice color contrasts when I take this just a little further. We’re getting there…

-- Mark, Jersey Shore, http://www.all-about-the-house.com





11 comments so far

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11639 posts in 2293 days


#1 posted 674 days ago

So far , so good ! This forum is for completed projects though : )
You might want to put this into a blog as you go forward with it : )

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View Mark's profile

Mark

26 posts in 1177 days


#2 posted 674 days ago

Oops – My bad: You’re absolutely right! Any idea if there’s an easy way to simply move this to the blog without deleting, re-writing and uploading? Thought this would make a nice addition with my other projects, but they’re all completed. Ugh… :-)

-- Mark, Jersey Shore, http://www.all-about-the-house.com

View Dusty56's profile

Dusty56

11639 posts in 2293 days


#3 posted 674 days ago

I’ve never tried to move a post before , so I can’t help you there. Someone will come along that knows how though : )

-- I'm absolutely positive that I couldn't be more uncertain!

View lightweightladylefty's profile

lightweightladylefty

2604 posts in 2318 days


#4 posted 674 days ago

Mark,

This is looking fantastic. Can’t wait to see it completed.

L/W

-- Jesus is the ONLY reason for ANY season.

View mtenterprises's profile

mtenterprises

816 posts in 1298 days


#5 posted 674 days ago

Nice job I did something similar in my front hall around the ceiling. And I see by your first picture you seem to have the same problem as I had, small gaps here and there which seem to have been taken care of in your last picture. What did you use to fill your gaps? I uses a spackle in a tube and in some cases backer rod behind that, very tedious work.
MIKE

-- See pictures on Flickr - http://www.flickr.com/photos/44216106@N07/ And visit my Facebook page - facebook.com/MTEnterprises

View Richforever's profile

Richforever

739 posts in 2326 days


#6 posted 674 days ago

Nicely done! Love those corner blocks in the crown molding!

-- Rich, Seattle, WA

View clarkey's profile

clarkey

442 posts in 1662 days


#7 posted 674 days ago

l love what you’ve done . One question what is the material your using ?

View Mark's profile

Mark

26 posts in 1177 days


#8 posted 674 days ago

Wow – Thank you all for the comments! Let me respond to all four:

1) Dusty/Debbie (from LJ) – I’m more than happy to move this post to the blog section if necessary. I was thinking of the design as being done (though construction still underway) when I popped this up last night, but no problem at all. Just let me know the best way – and we’ll make it so!

2) Lightweightladylefty – You may have the most interesting login name I’ve heard in a while. :-) Thank you for your comment!!

3) Mtenterprises – I fully agree – this work is incredibly tedious; patience is an imperative and sometimes I have to step-away and come back when I’m more focused. With coffee. I use wood filler to “tune” the trim-to-trim interfaces in projects like these. I’ve found this is least resistant to expansion, contraction & cracking over time. I also use caulking – but only as extra adhesion for the trim to the sheetrock, and also for a nice homogenous seal between the trim and sheetrock before I paint. I have another article on my website that shows some of this stuff in a lot more detail in case anyone is interested: Stairway Shadow Boxes.

4) Rich – Thank you! This is the first time I’ve ever used corner blocks, and while I fully agree they look really nice, the real reason I tried them is I thought they’d be easier. And they WERE. They absolve me from having to do a compound miter on the crown molding corners, which my brain always seems to have trouble with! And they look cool too… what could be better? ;-)

-- Mark, Jersey Shore, http://www.all-about-the-house.com

View Mark's profile

Mark

26 posts in 1177 days


#9 posted 673 days ago

Hi Clarkey -

Happy to answer your question, but there are so many materials I’m not 100% sure which you mean. Do you mean the specific trim type for the shadow boxes themselves, perhaps? If so, you can use whatever suits you. I usually buy a few types, bring them home and get a sense for what I think will look best – and I’ve used different variations in different rooms.

I hope the folks at LJ don’t mind me posting this here, but I made a video recently specifically for my website – that I haven’t even posted there yet. I’ll eventually do so in the coming weeks – but it is currently up on YouTube, and you’ll see it’s very my-site-specific… It shows, I think, what you’re asking about quite clearly. You can view it if you like – it’s called: Decorative Molding: Shadow Box Construction.

Does this help answer your question?

-- Mark, Jersey Shore, http://www.all-about-the-house.com

View clarkey's profile

clarkey

442 posts in 1662 days


#10 posted 673 days ago

Thanks Mark ! l guess more to the point it looks like you paint a lot of your trim and what l’m trying to find out is what trim material to use when its going to be painted . Also what books you would recommend on trim. Thanks Mark

View Mark's profile

Mark

26 posts in 1177 days


#11 posted 673 days ago

Regarding book recommendations – I use a few for sure, and I really believe in having some high quality glossy-photo books. There’s a list of four at the link at the very top in the project summary, replicated here for convenience.These type of books are not expensive at all – and if you find others that you can recommend, please let me know too! :-)

Regarding material – I’ve used both wood and composite, and they both tend to be paintable. I prefer real wood trim, though. I did use composite in the crown molding you see in the photos above… primarily because it was lighter, and it was just me up on the ladder.

-- Mark, Jersey Shore, http://www.all-about-the-house.com

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