LumberJocks

Shopmade Rip-Snorter Push Block

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Project by DeLayne Peck posted 09-18-2012 08:59 AM 8272 views 76 times favorited 17 comments Add to Favorites Watch

For some reason I have been doing more jigs than a Irish Folk Festival lately. Maybe it’s because I retired less than two years ago and finally have the time to enhance the capabilities of my shop. Here’s the latest, a push block, The Rip-Snorter:

The center block is fully adjustable. It slides horizontally on two steel 1/4” guide rods. The center block is connected by a single, central threaded insert and locking knob. Tightening the locking knob pulls the central block upward and secures it against the length of the top deck. Using guide rods greatly simplified construction, is friction free, and only serves to keep the center block aligned.

The “dog bone” handle allows the locking knob to pass freely underneath and tighten easily in any position. All 5 insert are 1/4’ 20 TPI.

Popular was used throughout. Dimensions were devined by guess and by golly. The main deck is 3/4” stock, 5 1/2” W x 2 1/2”H x 6” L. The rail side support is 5/16th thick, detachable, but not intended to be sacrificial. For ripping any thinner strips, I use a commercially available ball-bearing jig.

The opposite L support is downward adjustable and stabilizes the push block on stock narrower than 5 1/2” wide. It will accomodate stock up to 2” thick. It is 4” x 6” with a 1 1/2” foot. The foot is connected with inter-locking rabbits to increase gluing surface.

Traction is furnished by strips of an old, 1/4” thick mouse pad, rough side down.

Disclaimer: Any similiarity to anything else on Earth, living or dead, is completely coincidental. The Rip-Snorter is presented for entertainment purposes only. Consult a physician to make sure you are fit to rip or still ripping after 4 hours.


Follow Up Note:
I have been using the Rip-Snorter since I built it in Sept. 2012. After months of use, I can endorse it. I love the control it provides of both pieces of ripped wood. I puzzled over the dimensions working from a picture of the commercial version. I got them right. The rods, sliding center block, and single locking knob work exceedingly well. It’s very easy to adjust and lock. I’ll be very interested in any enhancements, post them here!

-- DJ Peck, Lincoln Nebraska. I think of my shop as Fritter City. I am the Mayor.





17 comments so far

View BigFoot Products Canada's profile

BigFoot Products Canada

629 posts in 2111 days


#1 posted 09-18-2012 10:44 AM

Hi There..
It looks similar to my Grip-N-Rip they work great!
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/14510

Why don’t you post the plans for it..

View HillbillyShooter's profile

HillbillyShooter

4825 posts in 1010 days


#2 posted 09-18-2012 12:20 PM

Great looking jig—posting the plan would also be great. Could you enlighten me further on what “a commercially available ball bearing jig for ripping thin stock” is? Thanks for the post.

-- John C. -- "Firearms are second only to the Constitution in importance; they are the peoples' liberty's teeth." George Washington

View mloy365's profile

mloy365

435 posts in 1848 days


#3 posted 09-18-2012 01:04 PM

I like it.

-- Mike - Northern Upper Michigan

View DeLayne Peck's profile

DeLayne Peck

352 posts in 919 days


#4 posted 09-18-2012 03:26 PM

I’d love to post plans, but I am frustrated beginner with Sketch Up.

Rockler has the Thin Rip Tablesaw Jig, here . I use mine with good results. Niney-eight reviews, 4+ stars.

Dave, I didn’t find your 2009 Grip-N-Rip post, wish I had. It is fabulous with detailed plans. Our dimensions are similiar. The Rip-Snorter has a stationary handle for simplicity. My guide rails eliminated two knobs and the use of T-track to keep the central block in alignment.

To perfectly align the holes that hold the guide rails, I taped the two sides of the frame together and stack drilled 1/4” holes. The holes are located 3/8th” down and 1” in from both ends. Corresponding 1/2” deep notches were then cut in the 1 1/2” square x 6” center block. A threaded insert was then install, dead center, 3” on the center block.

-- DJ Peck, Lincoln Nebraska. I think of my shop as Fritter City. I am the Mayor.

View Karson's profile

Karson

34901 posts in 3118 days


#5 posted 09-18-2012 10:21 PM

Nice functional jig. great build

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

11346 posts in 1408 days


#6 posted 09-19-2012 01:32 AM

That looks very professional and you gotta love the name! Good job.

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View davidroberts's profile

davidroberts

1003 posts in 2204 days


#7 posted 09-19-2012 01:59 AM

David Bethune – I tried to download your Grip N Rip plans shown in your seminal blog, but I could not connect to the upload. Are the plans still available? Thanks Actually David, I think the drawings you posted and the detailed text is quite sufficient, generous, in fact. Thanks

Delayne, great jig, great name. I may give it a try. I had a rip snort once. Had to leave work to change pants. Who is meh girl?, or am I just that thick?

-- God is great, wood is good. Let us thank Him for wood......and old hand tools.

View gfadvm's profile

gfadvm

11346 posts in 1408 days


#8 posted 09-19-2012 02:54 AM

David, I am LMAOROF over your rip snort comment!

-- " I'll try to be nicer, if you'll try to be smarter" gfadvm

View DeLayne Peck's profile

DeLayne Peck

352 posts in 919 days


#9 posted 09-19-2012 03:36 AM

Ah, the “Meh Girl !!!”

Some advertising that periodically shows up in the far right margin on the pages of LJs. Looks like a knock-kneed teenager with sunglasses in her panties. Selling T-shirts. Her’s says Meh.

I think we would have to be on some kind of offender register if that made us buy anything.

If you don’t get “Meh,” make the sound in your throat with your mouth closed.

-- DJ Peck, Lincoln Nebraska. I think of my shop as Fritter City. I am the Mayor.

View steliart's profile

steliart

1808 posts in 1406 days


#10 posted 07-01-2013 12:41 PM

Beautifully made, well done.

-- Stelios L.A. Stavrinides: - I am not so rich to buy cheap tools, but... necessity is the mother of inventions - http://www.steliart.com --

View Roger's profile

Roger

15039 posts in 1522 days


#11 posted 09-29-2013 12:36 PM

Well done.

-- Roger from KY. Work/Play/Travel Safe. Kentuk55@bellsouth.net

View oldnovice's profile

oldnovice

3845 posts in 2086 days


#12 posted 10-13-2013 04:57 AM

DeLayne, this looks like a good CNC project for making a lot of them. I have always thought about buying one but it is one of those tools you can do without based on COST. This changes everything.

Send me a Rip-Snorter, I’ll copy it into a CNC file and even make some pieces if you are so inclined!

-- "I never met a board I didn't like!"

View SawdustTX's profile

SawdustTX

182 posts in 1042 days


#13 posted 03-08-2014 02:21 PM

This looks like the same functionality as DavidBethunes’ awesome Grip-n-Rip post, but this one looks simpler to build. So, any downside to this one? Both look like great jigs, and I appreciate both posts, but if there’s not a significant advantage to the Grip-n-Rip, I’ll go with simpler and quicker to build. Any thoughts?

Thanks!

View DeLayne Peck's profile

DeLayne Peck

352 posts in 919 days


#14 posted 03-08-2014 04:57 PM

When I built the Rip Snorter, I couldn’t understand why the commercial push block used adjusters on the front and back. The only purpose is to secure the center block away from the saw blade and parallel to the fence.

Trapping two rods in the body of jig and sliding the center block along them is elegantly simple. Move one locking knob on top and it is reset. It’s quick, easy, no fiddling, less expensive, and easier to build.

The other mystery related to the commercial version is the moveable handle. A centered fixed handle is more balanced. Nothing is going to come loose and it affords excellent conrol. Slight pressure down and toward rail is all that is needed.

I love it. It’s my “go to” push block for ripping more dangerous narrow stock.

-- DJ Peck, Lincoln Nebraska. I think of my shop as Fritter City. I am the Mayor.

View SawdustTX's profile

SawdustTX

182 posts in 1042 days


#15 posted 03-08-2014 05:18 PM

Thanks for the feedback. Definitely going on my list to build. I was thinking of one mod – using aluminum instead of steel for the rods just in case the blade ever got to it. A carbide tipped blade can actually cut aluminum, while with steel I imagine contact would result in a bunch of sparks and the jig being thrown out of my hands.

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