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Toy box

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Project by Ken Reed posted 705 days ago 833 views 0 times favorited 11 comments Add to Favorites Watch

This box is made from one very wide sugar pine board! The last picture shows my 18” jointer plane sitting on the raw stock which was 24” wide! It wouldn’t fit through my 18” planer, so I hand planed it. Pine is such a joy to work with! Dovetailed joints. One picture shows a dollar bill for scale. For my new grandson.





11 comments so far

View SuburbanDon's profile

SuburbanDon

481 posts in 1580 days


#1 posted 705 days ago

Looks good. I like the dollar bill for scale. My dad was a mechanical engineer and they once had a giant paper clip made to fool people in scale pictures.

-- --- Measure twice, mis-cut, start over, repeat ---

View Ken Reed's profile

Ken Reed

151 posts in 1770 days


#2 posted 704 days ago

Don,

Great trick! My dad was a mechanical engineer as well, but he worked for the government with a “Q clearance” so I never really knew exactly what he did.

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

4683 posts in 1428 days


#3 posted 703 days ago

If he told you he’d have to kill you? LOL! Nice, and subltle piece!

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View Ken Reed's profile

Ken Reed

151 posts in 1770 days


#4 posted 703 days ago

DocSavage45,

He was tempted at times!!

View Mosquito's profile

Mosquito

4454 posts in 878 days


#5 posted 703 days ago

I’m glad you added size comparisons… seeing that first image makes it seem a lot smaller than it is!

Looks good. Must have been fun planing that whole board!

-- Mos - Twin Cities, MN -- Stanley #45 Evangelist - www.youtube.com/MosquitoMods

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

4683 posts in 1428 days


#6 posted 703 days ago

:-)

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View Ken Reed's profile

Ken Reed

151 posts in 1770 days


#7 posted 703 days ago

Mosquito,

Yep, I had a good time doing it. Pine is wonderful to plane and that’s my grandfather’s plane so it was nice to get it out for a little exercise.

View toddbeaulieu's profile

toddbeaulieu

389 posts in 1590 days


#8 posted 515 days ago

I can’t believe you flattened that board! Was it a lot of work?

I’m just starting to experiment with smaller scaled things and would like to know how you made the sliding tray.

Thanks for posting.

View Ken Reed's profile

Ken Reed

151 posts in 1770 days


#9 posted 515 days ago

Toddbeaulieu,

Flattening the board was not as much work as you might imagine. It took about an hour or two to do both sides. Note that the board was almost flat to begin with, knot free, and I mostly just removed the milling scars. Sugar pine cuts beautifully and with a Hock blade and chip breaker in my granddad’s old joiner plane it was actually fun to do.

The sliding tray is simple: it’s just a dovetailed box with dividers and an inset plywood bottom so it slides on the ends. The dividers were made using the Kerf Master jig that is easy to make; there are instructions elsewhere on this forum. The ends of the dividers run in stopped dadoes. Mill the stock a bit thicker than the router bit that you use for the dadoes and then either rabbet or taper the ends to fit. The tray has to fit very closely to the inside dimensions of the box, so make it just a tad bit oversize and plane to fit. If it’s too loose it won’t slide easily as it easily gets cocked and jammed. I used bamboo for the rails and waxed everything so it slides very easily.

I find it much more difficult to build very small things. It almost takes a different set of tools because you can’t use your 12” table saw on a piece that’s 1/8×3/8×1/2”. Also, very small things are picked up and held up to close scrutiny. A gap of .010” is huge on a tiny piece, but unnoticed on a 6 foot dining table apron.

Have fun and be safe!

View toddbeaulieu's profile

toddbeaulieu

389 posts in 1590 days


#10 posted 513 days ago

Thanks Ken. I just made a small drawer box for the kitchen and boy, small pieces sure are difficult! I made pull tapered knobs (copied from a recent project I saw) that I had to cut on the band saw, sand on the bench and then whittle the ends down to dowels. Luckily I’m kind of going for a rustic look because there was no way I’d get three identical pieces with that system!

I really want to learn how to make boxes. I see the most amazing boxes on this site and it’s so beyond my current know-how. I think I’ll get a book.

Do you mean you made vertical stop dados on the sides of the tray and slid the dividers in from below? And then inset the bottom? Did you chisel the ends of the dados to square them off? So far I’ve only done captive bottoms and it’s a PITA! No matter what I do they are always too small! Plus, the dado really eats into a small drawer’s space.

I’d love to make a kerf master. I almost did once and got nowhere trying to acquire the hardware. I was going to buy the real deal at xmas and they had none in stock and no time frame.

View Ken Reed's profile

Ken Reed

151 posts in 1770 days


#11 posted 513 days ago

Toddbeaulieu,

I’ve made multiple drawer knobs by shaping longer sticks on the router table, then crosscutting to get the size I wanted; it makes it much faster, but limits the shapes you can get somewhat. I used a screw from the back to attach, similar to the way commercial knobs are mounted. Just a thought.

Yes, vertical stops on the tray, or drawer or box…whatever. They have to be stopped at both ends; at the groove for the bottom and again at the top. The top either has to be squared with a small chisel or you can round your dividers. I don’t find captured bottoms to be difficult, but you do lose about 6mm (1/4”) in the box interior height, plus the thickness of the bottom, which as be quite thin for a small box. A good router table is a must for making boxes as far as I’m concerned, but it can be done with other tools. To measure the size of the bottom dry assemble the box, measure outside to outside then subtract the thickness of one of the sides, then subtract another 2mm or 1/16”, assuming that your dadoes are half the thickness of the side.

The Kerfmaker is easy and quick to make if you make it like this: http://lumberjocks.com/projects/51879 It works just as good as the fancy ones.

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