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how does legal wood work; Lacey Act and European FLEGT

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Project by marcosvillamontes posted 08-03-2012 02:09 PM 2445 views 2 times favorited 20 comments Add to Favorites Watch
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Legal wood; Lacey Act and European FLEGT

Here on the lumber forum I wanted to show what legal wood exactly means. This is a true wood project since there are several different steps in the process that are as follows:

1) you need to present proof of legal ownership to the authorities

2) once this is been approved (takes some 3 – 5 months because they lack qualified employees) then you start to map the concession

3) mapping the concession means that an engineer (like me) goes into the actual forest and maps all tree, one by one, on a list with its GPS X and Y coordinates.

4) All these coordinates are then plotted on to a map.

5) The authorities do not authorize to cut everything down, species that are few are forbidden to cut down and from the species that are abundant you can only cut down 90%. (in our case ipe, masaranduba, tigerwood, coffeewood and for the local Brazilian market Aroeira/ Cuchi).

6) Once approved everything you can start cutting, logging and transporting. The control since a few years has become very tight, every step is controlled by the authorities, so if you have 100 logs you cannot ‘in between’ cut an additional 100 extra logs. These additional logs need to have its documents otherwise cannot be transported or stored. The checkpoints are the transport (they check your truck) and storage (they come and check your inventory of everything you have; logs and boards.

7) Finally exporting to other countries can only be done with a document that reflects its load inside the truck/ container. At any moment they can and will check. Wood with no document is automatically confiscated including your truck. On the export document states the concession number, so for the clients this means proof of legal wood and that each board can be tracked back to exactly the spot where the trees have come from


each tree is mapped and receives a number which is attached to the tree itself


the concession is mapped on a satelite map


the entire concession with all its trees indified, one by one

-- Marcos Villamontes, Santa Cruz, http://www.roquevalente.com





20 comments so far

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

15960 posts in 1556 days


#1 posted 08-03-2012 02:44 PM

All of these governments will eventually collapse under their own weight. First of all they are all already heading for bankruptcy and cannot afford to enforce the regulations they already have passed. Secondly, the more regulations that they pass the more they burden the economy and their revenue will drop as a result, thus causing a double whammy. With the economy of nearly every developed country going downhill we shall see how long some of these regulations such as these remain in place.

It is interesting how they do this, however. Thanks for posting.

helluvawreck
https://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View marcosvillamontes's profile

marcosvillamontes

32 posts in 871 days


#2 posted 08-03-2012 03:41 PM

hmm., yes and no, time will tell, but I think that nowadays sustainable foresty is a very important selling point in a economic sence, besides they can do all this because demand is there and supply is only getting less and less. So I do not quite share your thoughts but of course time will tell.

-- Marcos Villamontes, Santa Cruz, http://www.roquevalente.com

View rbterhune's profile

rbterhune

173 posts in 1910 days


#3 posted 08-03-2012 03:44 PM

helluvawreck…not really sure that’s the positive attitude we should have with regard to ‘legal wood’. We should actually hope that all of these regulations stay in place and that these countries are able to sustain enforcement…otherwise, we have no wood to work with.

I’m a geologist, and as such, I take the conservation over preservation approach to most things with the environment. So, I don’t think we should stop all logging, but rather we take care with what we do log. Not only do we want sustainable woods for our hobby/craft/profession, we also must think of the wildlife habitat…again with a conservation approach, not a preservation approach.

Just a thought.

View marcosvillamontes's profile

marcosvillamontes

32 posts in 871 days


#4 posted 08-03-2012 04:05 PM

hello I understand your thoughts, but with logging you should think about going to the hairdresser, this does also not mean that all your hair will be cut away for ever. It is just a matter of trimming down and the same is true for sustainable foresty. So no soyafields after or cattle , after this logging it is prohibited to return to this area for the next 20!! years.

-- Marcos Villamontes, Santa Cruz, http://www.roquevalente.com

View helluvawreck's profile

helluvawreck

15960 posts in 1556 days


#5 posted 08-03-2012 04:39 PM

Well, look at it this way. Some regulations are necessary and this may be one of those. However, these governments always go overboard and pass way more regulations than they should or can even enforce and they also make the regulations far more complicated than they should. When the governments are going broke, and they are, they will be overburdened and eventually none of the regulations will be enforced well, not even the good ones. Yet, the economies will still suffer and the revenue of the governments will also decrease.

helluvawreck
https://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View marcosvillamontes's profile

marcosvillamontes

32 posts in 871 days


#6 posted 08-03-2012 05:16 PM

greed and morals, this would then be true for the short term because on the long term this sustainable way of foresty is better on the long term even for the greedy!

-- Marcos Villamontes, Santa Cruz, http://www.roquevalente.com

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

5101 posts in 1531 days


#7 posted 08-03-2012 05:26 PM

Nature is the forrest’s best manager? But nature is not allowed to take care of itself? Without trees to balance our antlike behavior we will perish. We tend to be reactive rather than proactive in our management, and our politics? Money and politics are both abstracts like economics? Yet we spend sooooo much mental energy in these things. We really need to understand our place in nature, but tht may or may not occurr? At least it seems not in my remaining lifetime. LOL!

You are all “Right” in your thinking. We like the ants, continue to grow and multiply, until our supplies run out?

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

5101 posts in 1531 days


#8 posted 08-03-2012 05:35 PM

Hey thanks for the interesting post!

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View MonteCristo's profile

MonteCristo

2097 posts in 877 days


#9 posted 08-03-2012 05:48 PM

I agree with DocSavage45. Regulation on this level seems crazy at first blush until you realize that there are a lot of greedy people out there that think only in the short term, their life span at most. That’s why fish stocks and countless other resources are sorely depleated. IMHO even the regulations proposed here will not stop this type of boneheaded thinking. It’s sad but those who will pay the price are yet to be born.

Good post ! Thanks for posting !

-- Dwight - "Free legal advice available - contact Dewey, Cheetam & Howe""

View Raymond Thomas's profile

Raymond Thomas

180 posts in 907 days


#10 posted 08-03-2012 06:38 PM

Very interesting posting. I didn’t really think of the efforts expended in controlling the logging and distribution of foreign grown woods. I am familiar with the efforts that are in effect in the USA but I didn’t realize how much more went into beyond that.

Thanks for posting.

-- Raymond, Charlotte, NC -------- Demonstrate the difference!

View exelectrician's profile

exelectrician

1665 posts in 1116 days


#11 posted 08-03-2012 07:13 PM

I was born and raised in Chingola Northern Rhodesia (now Zambia) there was natural forest every where, around where I lived, now I go on Google earth and I do not regognise the place! Every tree has been cut down – NO forest at all, just grassland.
I cannot believe that the country side has changed so much in 60 years…..

-- Love thy neighbour as thyself

View DocSavage45's profile

DocSavage45

5101 posts in 1531 days


#12 posted 08-03-2012 07:26 PM

:-) Ahmen!

-- Cau Haus Designs, Thomas J. Tieffenbacher

View Wes Giesbrecht's profile

Wes Giesbrecht

153 posts in 1500 days


#13 posted 08-03-2012 07:55 PM

I export my wallhangings, which often have 30 or more species of wood on them, to the States and am now required to attach a list of all species to the outside of the package, since import of many species is prohibited.
(There’s a list of prohibited species available online.)
However, anyone who’s seriously interested in wood ID knows that it’s a very complicated subject that requires a highly qualified examiner, with a microscope and razor thin slices of end grain to ensure accurate ID of species.

I buy all of my wood from reputable sources so I haven’t had any problems and I have no interest in using endangered species but I don’t imagine that there’s an expert wood ID person at the border crossing either.

On the other hand, I’m hearing from my musician friends that since importation of Rosewood and Ebony and other exotic woods are now illegal in the US, it’s no longer possible to take an instrument that has any of them in their structure, across the border from Canada, no matter if was built a hundred years ago or more.
Laws upon laws upon laws, most of which will either be unenforceable or do nothing but create enormous hassles for ordinary law abiding folks. Bleh!

-- Wes Giesbrecht http://www.wesgiesbrecht.com/index.htm

View bondogaposis's profile

bondogaposis

2599 posts in 1040 days


#14 posted 08-03-2012 08:14 PM

As a retired forester, I can appreciate the work that goes into a project like this. Keep up the good work. With out this type of control all of these lands will cleared for agriculture. This is best for the land and wood supply into the future. Only when forests can be managed sustainably will they continue exist.

-- Bondo Gaposis

View marcosvillamontes's profile

marcosvillamontes

32 posts in 871 days


#15 posted 08-03-2012 08:56 PM

exelectrician: you are so right, before working in Bolivia we operated in Brazil in the state of Mato Grosso and when you now visit these places it is just one huge field of saybeans. Some of my ecological friends condomn me for being a hardwood company but these same ecological friends tend to eat soybean food, exactly what harms most the forestry! (after cattle farming)

-- Marcos Villamontes, Santa Cruz, http://www.roquevalente.com

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