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Sawstop Overarm Dust Collection

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Project by Andrew posted 07-14-2012 02:44 PM 4654 views 16 times favorited 14 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Homemade overarm dust collector for my sawstop 3hp PCS. Big thanks to Paul-Marcel for his help, and to Brian for his initial design.

Like them, I did not want to spend $200 on the overarm dust collection assembly. This is made out of 1.25” EMT tubing (painted black), some bolts, nuts and star knobs. Oh, and paint of course :)

It seems to be quite effective, even on my temporary hookup to my shop-vac.

I made two small modifications to Paul-Marcel’s design:

1. T-Nuts on the bottom of the box to accept the bolts
2. Beam Hangers to attach the box to the rail so I wouldn’t have to drill holes. I will have to mod this slightly, as the star knobs sit about 1/8” proud of the TS surface (oops).

It’s basically a box/column that just fits the EMT tubing. It has a kerf cut into it, and the star knobs/bolts/t-nuts squeeze the box closed on the kerf, preventing the contraption from rotating backwards. Loosening those knobs allows the whole assembly to rotate backwards out of the way. *Edit – some counterbored holes slightly bigger than the shaft of the star knobs took care of it.

It’s two straight pieces of EMT and two elbows, all joined with EMT compression couplings. The white hose is 1.5” spa/pool hose which fits perfectly on both the EMT and the blade guard dust port.

There is a blast gate on the bottom to regulate how much suction comes through (lower) cabinet dust port.i have to leave it mostly closed in order to get good suction from above the TS. When I get this moved from the shop vac to the DC, I expect to be able to leave this a little more open.

This project cost about $50, instead of $200+tax, and I think it’s more functional than the SawStop version.

Thanks for looking.

-- Andrew - Albany. NY





14 comments so far

View SPalm's profile

SPalm

4845 posts in 2569 days


#1 posted 07-14-2012 04:24 PM

Very nice Andrew.
I would like one of these very much. Thanks for the tips.
So… what does your blade guard look like? Does the Saw Stop guard have a built in dust port?

Thanks for the inspiration,
Steve

-- -- I'm no rocket surgeon

View JJohnston's profile

JJohnston

1586 posts in 1978 days


#2 posted 07-14-2012 04:37 PM

I think the blade guard may just be the one that came with the saw. I’d like to know more about the beam hangers.

As for the knobs sticking up, how about take a Forstner bit a little bigger than the shank of the knob and drill a counterbore about 1/4” deep so the knobs sit that much lower?

-- "Sometimes even now, when I'm feeling lonely and beat, I drift back in time, and I find my feet...Down on Main Street." - Bob Seger

View Andrew's profile

Andrew

289 posts in 1054 days


#3 posted 07-14-2012 05:18 PM

Good idea on the counterbore idea – I may do that.

The SS blade guard has built-in dust collection:

-- Andrew - Albany. NY

View Andrew's profile

Andrew

289 posts in 1054 days


#4 posted 07-14-2012 09:28 PM

Here’s a pic of my blade guard with the hose attached:

-- Andrew - Albany. NY

View MonteCristo's profile

MonteCristo

2097 posts in 875 days


#5 posted 07-14-2012 10:29 PM

The acid test for DC at the blade seems to be trim cuts where the blade is not enclosed on both sides by the wood. So far I have not seen any system this is very effective in this case. I have the Excaliber guard (now made by General International). It’s worth having but does not pick up all the spray by any means. It seems to me your piping is too small (in diameter) to be able to evacuate a lot of the sawdust that gets flung by the blade – just not enough volume of air flow. At least that’s my experience.

-- Dwight - "Free legal advice available - contact Dewey, Cheetam & Howe""

View Andrew's profile

Andrew

289 posts in 1054 days


#6 posted 07-14-2012 10:34 PM

Yes, DC at the blade is very difficult with trim cuts, and this certainly does NOT do the job.
Paul-Marcel deals with this in his design with a second above-table host connected to the Veritas Magnetic dust chute. It works great.

For non-trim cuts, the effectiveness of this setup works quite well. There’s more airflow than you’d expect at the blade guard.

-- Andrew - Albany. NY

View Andrew's profile

Andrew

289 posts in 1054 days


#7 posted 07-15-2012 03:05 AM

JJohnston,

Good call on the counterbores., That’s exactly what I did. Worked great, i know have about 1/4” clearance.

The beam hangers look like this…

I used a 1/4” bolt to hold the beam hanger to the box. I put them in before assembling the box.

I took out the bolt that came with it and used a short 1/4” bolt from the bottom. The angle iron on the back rail of the TS gets wedged between the bolt and the round end of the beam clamp. Make sense?

-- Andrew - Albany. NY

View JJohnston's profile

JJohnston

1586 posts in 1978 days


#8 posted 07-15-2012 03:17 AM

Woo hoo! Somebody actually used my suggestion! So this is what it feels like!

Where did the beam hangers come from?

-- "Sometimes even now, when I'm feeling lonely and beat, I drift back in time, and I find my feet...Down on Main Street." - Bob Seger

View Andrew's profile

Andrew

289 posts in 1054 days


#9 posted 07-15-2012 03:20 AM

View JJohnston's profile

JJohnston

1586 posts in 1978 days


#10 posted 07-15-2012 03:24 AM

Good to know, thanks.

-- "Sometimes even now, when I'm feeling lonely and beat, I drift back in time, and I find my feet...Down on Main Street." - Bob Seger

View thedude50's profile

thedude50

3525 posts in 1165 days


#11 posted 07-15-2012 11:42 AM

I DON’T KNOW WHAT YOUR ACRONYM IS wth is emt tubing

also I don’t see any grounding wire did you use any ?

-- when I am not on Lumberjocks I am on @ http://thisoldworkshop.com where we allow free speech

View Andrew's profile

Andrew

289 posts in 1054 days


#12 posted 07-15-2012 12:05 PM

No, I didn’t ground it.

EMT is Electrical metallic tubing – it’s metal electrical conduit.

-- Andrew - Albany. NY

View thedude50's profile

thedude50

3525 posts in 1165 days


#13 posted 07-19-2012 07:23 AM

you should run a solid copper grounding wire through all your dust colection if you dont static can spark a fire in the dust and ruin your shop home or garage i like what you did i may look into adding something like this

-- when I am not on Lumberjocks I am on @ http://thisoldworkshop.com where we allow free speech

View jonwright's profile

jonwright

68 posts in 624 days


#14 posted 02-14-2013 03:25 PM

stupid question: why does everyone run the dust collection hoses on the long side of the table? Why not on the short (left as you are facing the work area of the machine)?

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