LumberJocks

Spring Pole Lathe turned projects

  • Advertise with us
Project by llwynog posted 749 days ago 3425 views 3 times favorited 15 comments Add to Favorites Watch

A few months ago, I built myself a small spring pole lathe and tested it with sculpture tools.

Since the proof of concept worked I bought some real turning tools (carbon steel, not HSS, specifically for pole spring lathes)

Although these lathes are usually related to working with green wood, I was quite amazed at the extremely clean surface that resulted in the cut from the new tools. After I sharpened them properly, I could see virtually no tearout and the surface could be finished right away.

  • Picture 1 : My first test piece with the new tools. A baby rattle for my cousin’s daughter. Finished with only salad bowl finish.
  • Picture 2 : The new tools and the above rattle
  • Picture 3 : Some spoons I turned with the lathe (made a couple more since then). Woods are Cherry and Plum (Mirabelle)
  • Picture 4 : A new handle for an old chisel (detailed blog post found here). Along with a top for my son to play with.
  • Picture 5 : Roy Underhill’s mystery mallet : the handle was turned off-center on the lathe.

That’s all.

Have fun,

-- Fabrice - "On est bien bête mais on sent bien quand on se fait mal" - my grandfather





15 comments so far

View michelletwo's profile

michelletwo

2196 posts in 1619 days


#1 posted 749 days ago

hooray for you..I made my first lathe about 30 yrs ago & turned chair parts on it..1 leg-power is grand

-- We call the destruction of replaceable human made items vandalism, while the destruction of irreplaceable natural resources is called development.

View Sodabowski's profile

Sodabowski

2002 posts in 1436 days


#2 posted 749 days ago

! :)

-- Holy scrap Barkman!

View HalDougherty's profile

HalDougherty

1820 posts in 1840 days


#3 posted 749 days ago

That’s a beautiful rattle! (so are the other items). I especially like your spring pole lathe. It’s amazing how much you can do in a limited space. Next time you go to the lumberyard that supplies walnut to Rolls-Royce, how about taking some pictures of the slabs and lumber for a blog post? I’d like to see what they have to compare it to the American black walnut I saw. Thanks in advance.

-- Hal, Tennessee http://www.first285.com

View llwynog's profile

llwynog

282 posts in 1182 days


#4 posted 749 days ago

Thank you everyone.
Hal, I am not planning to go to that lumberyard any time soon as I will most likely move and cannot afford to buy any more wood right now.
The lumberyard however is the following :
http://www.scierie-forest.com/

American walnut and European walnut are indeed very different. I love both but for different reasons.
American walnut is indeed very dark while European walnut is much lighter in tone.
In France, the best quality walnut is considered to come from the Isere region, where this lumberyard is located.

I hope this helps,

-- Fabrice - "On est bien bête mais on sent bien quand on se fait mal" - my grandfather

View HalDougherty's profile

HalDougherty

1820 posts in 1840 days


#5 posted 749 days ago

Thank you for the link. The photos on the site showed a great deal of detail. I’d love to visit a French sawmill one day. I’ve watched every stage of the Tour De France this year and on one stage they passed a forest and long straight logs were stacked next to the road waiting to be transported to the mill… I see a lot of exotic lumber here on Lumberjocks and while it’s beautiful, I’m just glad I live in the Appalachian Mountains where black walnut, wild cherry and maple grow everywhere. Here’s a link to photographs of some of the trees on my property.

http://lumberjocks.com/HalDougherty/blog/20292

If they supply walnut to Rolls-Royce I bet I couldn’t afford to buy anything from them. I looked over the website and searched Google maps for their address. You can get a street view of the sawmill. The Google mapping car has passed by at some time. They also drove past my house in East Tennessee. The French countryside looks a lot like it does here in East Tennessee.

-- Hal, Tennessee http://www.first285.com

View Dave's profile

Dave

11142 posts in 1443 days


#6 posted 748 days ago

Now that is some amazing turning. Very impressive indeed. Bravo!

-- Superdav "No matter where you go - there you are." http://chiselandforge.com

View llwynog's profile

llwynog

282 posts in 1182 days


#7 posted 748 days ago

Michelletwo, Thomas, Dave, thank you.

Hal, I have already bought some walnut from this lumberyard. They have actually some of the most affordable walnut in the region, as they handle so much of it. Of course, Rolls-Royce quality is probably a lot more expensive than the regular one but I was still very happy with the one I bought at the time. If I had some room to store more wood, I would probably buy some from there.
I used the wood I bought at their place in these 2 projects :
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/48248 and http://lumberjocks.com/projects/48247
Once, a friend of mine gave me some black American walnut and I used it in this project :
http://lumberjocks.com/projects/48246
I really loved to work with American walnut, I wish I had more to work with.

-- Fabrice - "On est bien bête mais on sent bien quand on se fait mal" - my grandfather

View HalDougherty's profile

HalDougherty

1820 posts in 1840 days


#8 posted 748 days ago

Come to East Tennessee and I’ll give you some beautiful American black walnut. I don’t steam it, so the colors are very bright after some sanding and after rubbing in a couple of coats of tung oil. Only a couple of big problems… The freight would be expensive and there is a tree disease (1000 cankers) that is causing the death of walnut trees. Diseased trees have been found less than 100 miles from where I live so transport of raw wood is prohibited. Finished lumber that’s been kiln dried and finished products are not affected by the transport ban. At this time there isn’t a cost effective treatment for 1000 cankers disease. I sure hope one is found before black walnut lumber becomes as scarce as American chestnut.

-- Hal, Tennessee http://www.first285.com

View mafe's profile

mafe

9456 posts in 1693 days


#9 posted 748 days ago

Wooooo
Cool stuff.
Love those turning tools.
Beautiful mallet.
What a glow on that handle.
Best thoughts,
Mads

-- Mad F, the fanatical rhykenologist and vintage architect. Democraticwoodworking.

View SawDustKing's profile

SawDustKing

173 posts in 785 days


#10 posted 748 days ago

I really like the mallet.. Good job on the turn also. I don’t know what a spring lathe is exactly, but I’m guessing it helped you to make those “slanted” turns.. I’m a little confused how that was accomplished. Thanks for sharing.

-- Woodworking for the hobbyist woodworker. http://sawdustking.com

View llwynog's profile

llwynog

282 posts in 1182 days


#11 posted 747 days ago

Hal, I’d love to visit more of the USA some day. So far the only places I have been are Arkansas, New Hampshire and Massachusetts (Boston).

Mads, you were an inspiration along with Andy in restoring old tools.

SawDustKing, a spring pole lathe is a foot operated lathe (no motor) which moves in a reciprocating fashion : you cut when the wood is turning in one direction then you lift the tool and let the spring rewind in the other direction. You cannot leave the tool in contact with the wood all the time. Not sure what you refer to as “slanted” turns though… maybe the captive rings on the rattle?

-- Fabrice - "On est bien bête mais on sent bien quand on se fait mal" - my grandfather

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6750 posts in 1755 days


#12 posted 747 days ago

Very nice, the Walnut is spectacular, the rattle is amazing, as well as the other projects.

I really like the tools, I didnt know they made tools made for spring pole lathes. I just started turning and I’ve heard it said that if you have the skill no sanding is required, I hope to get there some day. So far the only thing I have turned are cylinders for making wooden screws.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View llwynog's profile

llwynog

282 posts in 1182 days


#13 posted 746 days ago

Hi Mauricio.
If you are lucky, you can find old turning tools on ebay for quite cheap. If you buy old enough tools you will be sure they will be high carbon steel and not HSS, which is better for pole lathe turning. I was too eager to try turning that I bought my tools new (Ray Iles tools) but if I had been more patient I could have bought some much cheaper on ebay.

With sharp tools it is actually very easy to get a surface that require virtually no sanding. The best results are obtained with a skew chisel but I still have a lot of grabbing issues when using it (the spindle gouge is much easier to control I have found).

-- Fabrice - "On est bien bête mais on sent bien quand on se fait mal" - my grandfather

View Mauricio's profile

Mauricio

6750 posts in 1755 days


#14 posted 746 days ago

I’ll keep a look out, my bench will have a wagon vise, I have to see if I can make the lathe thing work through the wagon vise hole. I still have to finish my bench though so its still dreams at this point.

-- Mauricio - Woodstock, GA - "Confusion is the Womb of Learning, with utter conviction being it's Tomb" Prof. T.O. Nitsch

View Philip's profile

Philip

1081 posts in 1142 days


#15 posted 739 days ago

Fantastic! Great to see the work from a vice-lathe, awesome.

-- If you can dream it, I can do it!

Have your say...

You must be signed in to post the comments.

DISCLAIMER: Any posts on LJ are posted by individuals acting in their own right and do not necessarily reflect the views of LJ. LJ will not be held liable for the actions of any user.

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

HomeRefurbers.com

Latest Projects | Latest Blog Entries | Latest Forum Topics

GardenTenders.com :: gardening showcase