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Kitchen Remodel

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Project by Lee A. Jesberger posted 04-13-2008 01:22 AM 3090 views 1 time favorited 31 comments Add to Favorites Watch

Hi all;

This is a project we did a few years back, and while it was a fairly large renovation to a small house, I could only find a few pictures.

One is the shot after the demolition work. It entailed removing the original rear brick wall of the building and installing a steel beam to support the upper floors and the rest of the brick wall.

This opened to an extension that had been built previously added to the structure. The small addition was accessible by a rather small doorway.

This basically doubled the kitchen size as well as opened up the first floor dramatically.

After the demo was completed we installed the cabinets and mill work, which we built during the renovations.

The other photos are the completed space.

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com





31 comments so far

View Grumpy's profile

Grumpy

19570 posts in 2541 days


#1 posted 04-13-2008 01:48 AM

Thats what I call starting from scratch Lee. Great end result. Did you build the cupboards as well?.

-- Grumpy - "Always look on the bright side of life"- Monty Python

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6664 posts in 2669 days


#2 posted 04-13-2008 02:40 AM

Hi Grumpy;

Yes sir.

My actual business, or at least was General Contractor. We handle everything from demolition to handing the owner the key. (including building the cabinets and cupboards).

Thank you Grumpy;

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View romansfivefive's profile

romansfivefive

299 posts in 2463 days


#3 posted 04-13-2008 02:49 AM

that looks awesome. i had better not let my wife see it

-- The CNC machine can either produce the work of art you imagined, or very decorative firewood.

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6664 posts in 2669 days


#4 posted 04-13-2008 03:00 AM

Hi Rob;

Are you telling me a story? (I checked your website)

Since I didn’t notice you sneak in, welcome to lumberjocks. (sometimes I don’t pay attention so good) lol

Thank you;

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View kev's profile

kev

111 posts in 2742 days


#5 posted 04-13-2008 03:06 AM

How did you do the finish work, it looks really nice.

kevin

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6664 posts in 2669 days


#6 posted 04-13-2008 03:13 AM

Hi Kev;

Believe it or not it is a brushed on paint, complete with brush stroke marks! This was at the request of the architect. A more authentic replication of the period of the house.

And, although I didn’t like the idea of it, I did like the finished look very much.

And thank you for the compliment!

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View john's profile

john

2302 posts in 3071 days


#7 posted 04-13-2008 03:26 AM

Beautiful job Lee , i really like the glass look in the cabinet doors . great job !!!
I wish my kitchen looked like that .

-- John in Belgrave (Website) http://www.extremebirdhouse.com , http://www.facebook.com/group.php?gid=112698715866

View Karson's profile

Karson

34891 posts in 3090 days


#8 posted 04-13-2008 05:11 AM

Lee. A very nice completion. The space improved and the cabinets are very nice.

-- I've been blessed with a father who liked to tinker in wood, and a wife who lets me tinker in wood. Southern Delaware karson_morrison@bigfoot.com †

View Thos. Angle's profile

Thos. Angle

4437 posts in 2652 days


#9 posted 04-13-2008 06:01 AM

Nice work, Lee. As expected.

-- Thos. Angle, Jordan Valley, Oregon

View Bradford's profile

Bradford

1434 posts in 2512 days


#10 posted 04-13-2008 06:37 AM

Did you do the tile work also? That looks like a two week job, just doing the tiles alone. The whole project looks amazing. Very nice work.

-- so much wood, so little time. Bradford. Wood-a-holics unanimous president

View dlcarver's profile

dlcarver

270 posts in 2420 days


#11 posted 04-13-2008 01:05 PM

Nice Lee. If we were close together, I would have you do mine…......SERIOUSLY!

Dave

-- Dave Leitem,Butler,Pa.,http://dlcarver.etsy.com

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6664 posts in 2669 days


#12 posted 04-13-2008 03:48 PM

Hi John;

That particular glass style really did add to the look of the kitchen. Again chosen by the architect.

Well get busy building it. You’ll score a lot of brownie points for it!

Thank you;

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6664 posts in 2669 days


#13 posted 04-13-2008 03:48 PM

Thank you Karson.

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6664 posts in 2669 days


#14 posted 04-13-2008 03:50 PM

Hi Thomas;

Where have you been hiding?

I appreciate the confidence.

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

View Lee A. Jesberger's profile

Lee A. Jesberger

6664 posts in 2669 days


#15 posted 04-13-2008 04:08 PM

Hi Bradford;

Yes we did the tile also, and what pain it was. The client is very “anal”. He double checked things he already double checked.

The tiles are an expensive designer tile, made of glass which are mounted to a piece of paper, somewhat haphazardly, with chipped and warped pieces throughout.

The installation process involved setting these 1 foot square sheets, paper side out, so you cant see the tile itself as your working. The following day you remove the paper by wetting it.

Some of the tiles are so warped they come off with the paper! Installation instructions are very specific on the type trowel used for the thinset. The teeth are so small the warped tile barely touched the wall.

We had to go back after removing the paper and installing the individual pieces with epoxy. The owner would pick out individual tiles and complain about the chips and irregularities in the pattern.

Not the best choice of tile for an anal client. Again the architect.

But in the end everyone was happy, and it does look good.

The floor tile was just as bad, regarding irregularities except they weren’t a mosaic style, (mounted to a sheet). Imagine setting individual 2” square tiles. Very frustrating trying to keep things straight.

I guess that’s part of the fun of a construction business.

Lee

-- by Lee A. Jesberger http://www.prowoodworkingtips.com http://www.ezee-feed.com

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