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The Absurd cross cut sled

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Project by lumberjoe posted 06-24-2012 11:36 PM 3558 views 17 times favorited 20 comments Add to Favorites Watch

First off, HUGE thanks go to helluvawreck (Charles) for some great tips. This is my first shop made jig that is multiple use. I’ve hacked together some crap for single uses, such as fences for routing dados and mortises, but nothing that would be used more than once. Overall, this was tons of fun. I went a little overboard and it looks like something a 3rd grader would draw if you asked them to draw their favorite transformer.

Essentials for everyone who doesn’t feel like reading a book:
Base – 1/2” BB ply – 36” wide, 24” deep
Back fence (closet to operator) 2(two) 3/4” BB ply laminated. 4” tall
Front fence (furthest from operator) started life as a doug fir 2*8. It’s now 4” tall and 12” long
Blade guard – Ambrosia maple
Handle – Oak and ambrosia maple
Runners – hard maple
Angle Miter fence 3/4 BB ply. 26” long, 3.5” wide

Other:
Woodpeckers T track knobs (x4)
Woodpeckers T-track hold down, knurled knob (x4, 1 used)
Kreg T-track clamps (x2)
Incra T-track plus – 36”
Incra T-track – 24”
Incra T-track stops (x2)
1/8” ballistic lexan

I made 4 of my own “T tracks” in the bottom by routing a 1/4 dado all the way through. After that, I routed a 1/2” dado down the middle of each about 3/16 deep. These allow me to set up the miter gauge and use T track clamps:

I then sent some hard maple through my planer until it could just barely squeeze inside the miter track on the table saw:

I cut them just shy on the depth so they wouldn’t bottom out and to ensure the sled would ride flat. There are some great tips in my blog on setting the runners. It worked like a charm.

After that I just started attaching a bunch of crap. I made a nice handle out of some amborsia maple encased in oak that I was messing around with previously. I just rounded over all 4 edges and bolted it on. The blade guard on the back is also ambrosia maple, that was the only scraps I had big enough:

Handle: (blade guard pictured above)

I mounted the T-Track plus with the ruler on the top of the sled. I was going to get a Kreg swing stop, but those things are 30$! Instead I got two Incra T-Track stops and made my own stop block out of oak. I just set the Incra stop where I want it and can move the stop block into place our out of the way without messing with anything. I have one on the big fence and one on the miter attachment. You can see it in the pictures for the project

Also I made setting 45 degree angles with the miter fence a little easier on myself. I got the angle dialed in by making TONS of cuts. When I could put 4 pieces together in a perfect square with no daylight in the joints, I drilled two holes infront of the miter fence. Now to repeat that angle, I get it close to the holes, trow some bolts in, and snug it to the bolts, and crank down those nice woodpeckers knobs:

I wanted to get a 24” T-Track plus (with the ruler, like on top) for the miter fence, but it was too wide and would have nicked the blade. I had to use the standard T- Track. This isn’t a big deal because I like to cut the wood square and sneak up on miters, so I go from pencil lines instead of measurements anyway. There is an oak stop block and an Incra T-Track stop on that as well.

I have a habit of losing EVERYTHING the second I put it down. I made it so I can keep the miter fence, the miter fence hold downs, and the stop block + hold down on the back of the sled when not in use, This cane also be seen in the pics above and here:

Last, once the basic construction was done, I started using this to make the blade guard, handle, etc. I noticed I had a tendency when cutting multiple pieces to reach in and move the off cuts with the saw running. I put a piece of lexan over the blade. It is higher in the back so the stop block can pass under it. I realize realistically this provides 0 protection, however it makes it a real pain to get my hand under there without thinking about it. One nice feature, it keeps the dust out of my face when peeking over the blade. The lexan is epoxied and screwed into blocks.

All in all this was a lot if fun. I could have made it look nicer, but I am sick of complex joinery. Sometimes “glued and screwed” feels good. Comments and harsh criticism welcome

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts





20 comments so far

View Skylark53's profile

Skylark53

2564 posts in 1716 days


#1 posted 06-25-2012 12:15 AM

Very good work. You’ll enjoy using this; all your planning and extra efforts will be worth the time and money.

-- Rick, Tennessee, John 3:16

View D_Allen's profile

D_Allen

495 posts in 1440 days


#2 posted 06-25-2012 12:25 AM

Lots of good stuff on this one. I may add some of these as well to mine.
One question I have about sleds. I notice that most sleds made are able to cut completely through both fences.
On mine, there is only a back fence and I installed a block underneath that prevents the sled from going too far in either direction. This way I don’t worry about cutting too far and exposing the blade.

-- Website is finally up and running....www.woodandwrite.com

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2833 posts in 904 days


#3 posted 06-25-2012 01:02 AM

Thanks!. Rather than a stop, I put a box in the back that extends 6” past the rear fence as a guard. I suppose I could cut through it, however the sled would be almost off the table at that point

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2833 posts in 904 days


#4 posted 06-25-2012 01:22 AM

I think I should have held off on posting this just yet. The 1/2 base feels a little flimsy for all the crap on it. I many use a piece of 3/4 instead. Also I may go 30” wide so I can fit full 24” pieces in it

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

View D_Allen's profile

D_Allen

495 posts in 1440 days


#5 posted 06-25-2012 01:28 AM

I see your point. I doubt you would push it that far.
This thing has to weigh more than a few pounds.
Where do you store it when it is not in use?

-- Website is finally up and running....www.woodandwrite.com

View D_Allen's profile

D_Allen

495 posts in 1440 days


#6 posted 06-25-2012 01:30 AM

I used a piece of 24” wide particle board with the white plastic laminate.
It makes it heavy but it is more stable then plywood, IMHO.

-- Website is finally up and running....www.woodandwrite.com

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2833 posts in 904 days


#7 posted 06-25-2012 01:32 AM

It’s HEAVY. I hang it off the back of my outfeed table when not in use

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

View WoodSpanker's profile

WoodSpanker

519 posts in 2048 days


#8 posted 06-25-2012 07:12 AM

Absurd is a matter of opinion! If it works it works. :)

-- Adventure? Heh! Excitement? Heh! A Woodworker craves not these things!

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2833 posts in 904 days


#9 posted 06-25-2012 10:21 AM

It works great! I actually got a lot done this weekend. In addition to building hte sled, I built a raised planter bed for my wife and that outfeed table. It came in really handy

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2833 posts in 904 days


#10 posted 06-25-2012 12:46 PM

Also, has anyone used the Woodpeckers T-Track clamps? I bought the Kreg ones because there were in stock, but they aren’t great.

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

View Brohymn62's profile

Brohymn62

120 posts in 912 days


#11 posted 06-25-2012 01:18 PM

Very nice!

-- Chris G. ; Los Angeles, CA

View mloy365's profile

mloy365

433 posts in 1786 days


#12 posted 06-25-2012 02:20 PM

NICE!

-- Mike - Northern Upper Michigan

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2833 posts in 904 days


#13 posted 06-25-2012 02:30 PM

Thanks guys! I really took my time with this one (even though it doesn’t look like it).

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

View helluvawreck's profile (online now)

helluvawreck

15807 posts in 1523 days


#14 posted 06-25-2012 03:13 PM

Joe, it really turned out nice and you should be totally proud of yourself. You have some very nice hardware on that sled and , no doubt, you will come up with some more improvements as well. I appreciate the compliments but they were totally unnecessary. I just happened to speak up on this thread at the right time. Like I said, I’ve hung around here a couple of years and learned a thing or two but that is about it. Your in the right place – there are a lot of people on here that can do some remarkable things with wood and many of them will give you a lot of help.

From what I have seen you do with this jig, however, you’ll probably need less help than you think. May you always be happy in your woodworking.

helluvawreck
https://woodworkingexpo.wordpress.com

-- If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away. Henry David Thoreau

View lumberjoe's profile

lumberjoe

2833 posts in 904 days


#15 posted 06-25-2012 03:53 PM

Thanks! I was really struggling with the rails and could not get them to attach AND slide evenly. Your method worked like a charm. This thing glides right off the table with no effort at all. There is also NO side-to-side movement at all. It’s actually tighter than the miter gauge that came with the saw, and slides nicer. I put a few coats of Johnsons paste wax on the whole bottom as well, but it didn’t even need it.

-- www.etsy.com/shop/KandJWoodCrafts

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